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Simple and Compound Sentences

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Kathy Pate

on 10 December 2014

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Transcript of Simple and Compound Sentences

A simple sentence contains a
and a
A compound sentence consists of two or more sentences joined by a comma followed by a
"Tell the truth, work hard, and come to dinner on time."

Gerald R. Ford
"A man may die, nations may rise and fall,
but an idea lives on."

John F. Kennedy
Simple and Compound

So why is this important?

The use of too many simple sentences can make writing "choppy" and can prevent the writing from flowing smoothly.

Becoming aware of both simple and compound sentences can help you vary the sentences in your writing.
A simple sentence can contain a
compound subject
or a
compound verb

=the noun that the sentence is about.

=starts with the verb and tells what the subject is doing.
Compound is composed of two or more parts.

likes to eat.
Sarah and I
to the beach and
in the ocean.
Can you decide whether the following quotes are simple or compound sentences?
"Don't let yesterday use up too much of today."

Will Rogers
"The time is always right to do what is right."

Martin Luther King Jr.
"Whatever you are, be a good one."

Abraham Lincoln
Full transcript