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SUSIBU AY 17-18

Most current. For use during AY 17-18
by

Ashley Slay

on 24 September 2018

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Transcript of SUSIBU AY 17-18

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Objectives


Identify ways to be prosocial bystanders in order to create change in the BU community.

Think critically about difficult situations and how we can challenge inappropriate behaviors.

Develop realistic intervention strategies that keep safety in mind.


Break Time
Dr. David Lisak, Psychologist, conducted research at UMASS Boston studying men who had raped but were never reported or prosecuted.

Health surveys were administered to college-aged men embedded with behavioral questions.

In a sample of nearly 2,000 men, 120 men (6%) committed rape of women they knew.

Direct
“I’m going to be really worried about you tonight if I don’t know where you are. How about we go?”
“OMG, this would make for a great bystander intervention story!”
"It looks like you might not want to go upstairs. Let's go somewhere else."

Distract
"Hey, I want to go home. Will you walk with me so I'm not by myself?"
"Hey, I was looking for you. I have a hankering for some
kale
."

Delegate
Find others to intervene on your behalf, or with you!
The hosts of the party, friends of the other person, your friends, or other partygoers.













Adapted from Bringing in the Bystander (Moynihan, Eckstein, Banyard & Plante)©

SCENARIOs

You are at a bar when it closes and while waiting for a cab your roommate is talking to someone who is clearly slurring their words and not steady on their feet. Your roommate tells you that they’re going to take off to go somewhere private. What do you do?

You overhear your supervisor at work say to a coworker that they wish their boyfriend had a butt like him. What do you do?

You are watching a crime show on television with your friend and a story comes on about someone being raped by a friend. Your friend makes a comment that the victim is lying because the victim and the perpetrator were friends. What do you do?


Bystanders
Perpetrator
Facilitators
Homophobia
Sexism
Sexual
Objectification
Rape Myths
Hypermasculinity
Rape Culture
Adapted from David Lisak
Bystander Experiences
Leadership
Bystander
Prosocial
Bystander
Model
BU
Prosocial Bystanders
Up close
From afar
Alone
With others
Sexual Violence Statistics
Sexual Violence
Sexual Assault
Covers a range of coercive behaviors which violate both state legal statutes and Boston University's Disciplinary Code. Sexual assault includes any type of physical sexual contact that occurs without consent, through coercion, or by force.
Rape
Any type of sexual intercourse without consent, through coercion, by force, or by threat.
Adapted from Bringing in the Bystander (Moynihan, Eckstein, Banyard & Plante)©

Consent
Alcohol and Consent
Nobody can consent to sexual activity while incapacitated.

Someone cannot use their own intoxication as an excuse to harm another person.
Sexual Violence Research
Dr. David Lisak

"The Undetected Rapist"
3. At a party, you see someone trying to get an intoxicated friend of yours to go into a bedroom with them.
What can you do?
Least Safe
Most Safe
An informed, freely given, voluntary agreement. Consent is given through mutually understandable words and/or actions that express a willingness to engage in agreed upon sexual activity.
A person cannot give consent if they are:
Incapacitated
Under the age of 16 (Massachusetts)

2. You're in the common room watching a crime show with your roommate.
The crime is about someone being raped by a friend.
Your roommate mentions that the victim is lying because the victim and the perpetrator were friends.
What can you do?

1. You are at a bar when it closes and while waiting for an Uber your friend is talking to someone who you think might be incapacitated. Your friend tells you that they're going to take off to go somewhere private.
What can you do?
Thank you!


People assault People
In the United States:

1 in 2 transgender* individuals
1 in 6 cisgender* women
1 in 71 cisgender men
experience an attempted or completed rape at some point in their lives. [5, 1]
On College Campuses:

1 in 5 cisgender women experience sexual assault since entering college. [2]

90% of perpetrators of sexual assault are known by the survivor. [3]
Fewer than 5% of incidents of completed or attempted rape are reported to authorities. [2]

Between 2-8% of reports of sexual assault are classified as false reports. [4]
I should mind my own business.
It’s not my problem or responsibility.
I don't want to make it worse.
I don't know what to do.
I'm worried I'll be criticized.
Someone else can intervene better than I can.
I'm worried I'm misreading the situation.
I'm worried about my safety.
It involves someone I care about.
An instinctual feeling kicks in.
I sense it's the "right" thing to do.
I think someone's safety is in jeopardy.
I feel empathy for others in the situation.
I don't want to worry about them later on.
I've had role models or have seen others intervene.
Some reasons people don't intervene:
Some reasons people do intervene:
Direct
Check in directly.
If you don't know the perpetrator, it's often safer to address the survivor.
"Do you need help?" "Are you okay?"
If you feel comfortable, you can try to create a physical barrier.



Distract
Distract them away from the situation.
"Hey, can I show you something?" "Will you walk me home?"
"Someone by the bathroom is looking for you."

Delegate
Talk with others (who may have more social power) about what's going on.
Others may be better positioned to intervene - but must be asked!
Friends, party hosts, bouncers, bartenders, RA's, security guards, police.
Can you think of a situation when you either
did
OR
did not
intervene?


Consent


Racism
Scenarios

A community approach
to sexual violence prevention.
People who intervene in situations
to impact the outcome in a positive way.
People who are present and have the
opportunity to intervene, do nothing,
or contribute to negative behavior.
Delay
Someone tells you about something that happened to them.
"I'm sorry that happened to you. That's not okay."
At a party, you see someone trying to get an intoxicated friend of yours to go into a bedroom with them.
What can you do?
1. Black MC, Basile KC, Breiding MJ, Smith SG, Walters ML, Merrick MT, Chen J, Stevens MR. The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS): 2010 Summary Report. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2011.
2. Krebs, C. P., Lindquist, C. H., Warner, T. D., Fisher, B. S., & Martin, S. L. (2007). The Campus Sexual Assault (CSA) Study (221153). Washington, DC: National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice.;  Krebs, C. P., Lindquist, C. H., Warner, T. D., Fisher, B. S., & Martin, S. L (2009) College Women’s Experiences with Physically Forced, Alcohol or Other Drug-Enabled, and Drug-Facilitated Sexual Assault Before and Since Entering College. Journal of American College Health, 57(6), 639-647.
3. Fisher, B.S., F.T. Cullen, and M.. Turner. The Sexual Victimization of College Women. Washington, DC; U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics and National Institute of Justice, 2000, NCJ 182369.
4. Lonsway, K.A., Archambault, J., Lisak, D. (2009). False Reports: Moving Beyond the Issue to Successfully Investigate and Prosecute Non-Stranger Sexual Assault. The National Center for the Prosecution of Violence Against Women.
Sources
*Transgender: A person who lives as a member of a gender other than that expected based on their sex assigned at birth.

*Cisgender: A person who lives as a member of the gender that is expected based on their sex assigned at birth.
What about when both/all people are drinking?
What is incapacitation?
Is consent only verbal?
Bystander Effect & Diffusion of Responsibility
1 in 16 cisgender men experience sexual assault since entering college. [2]
LGBTQ+ students are more likely to experience sexual assault than heterosexual, cisgender students. [5]
Full transcript