Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Using Quotations

No description
by

Meri Buchanan

on 26 September 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Using Quotations

USING QUOTATIONS
-to introduce the long quotation, use a colon (:), not a comma, preceding the quote, if the quote flows smoothly into the sentence before it
-OR end the sentence before the quote with a period and let the long quote stand alone in a sentence itself
-begin the quotation on a new line and indent every line of the passage 10 spaces (2 TABS)
-double space entire quotation
additional notes
-DO NOT enclose the passage in quotation marks (unless there are quotes in the passage you are copying)
-end the quotation with a period (or other punctuation mark used by author)
-parenthetical documentation comes after punctuation mark
-after the long quote, continue the paragraph it's in on a new line, flush against the left margin (DO NOT INDENT)
Ellipses
Using Full Sentence Quotations
Quoting Lines of Poetry
Using Long Quotations
- Use a comma, before the opening quotation marks, to introduce the quotation
- Capitalize the first letter in the quotation
- Use a period INSIDE the closing quotation mark if it is at the end of a sentence
- Use a comma INSIDE the closing quotation mark if the sentence continues
- Use single quotation marks to punctuate a quotation within a quotation (when the quote you use already has quotation marks in it).
- Avoid parenthetical documentation unless you have a works cited page

Words that are omitted at the beginning
2 Key Rules for Quoting Poetry
1. Poetry requires writers to state line/stanza numbers, not page numbers.
2. Poetry requires writers to keep line breaks intact.
Quoting Different Quantities of Lines
1, 2, or 3 Lines
4 or More Lines
Rule: Use quotation marks. Use a slash to indicate the break between lines. If you don't have a works cited page, state the line or stanza numbers. If you do have a works cited page, put the line numbers in parentheses and place the period at the end of the line number(s).
Example:
In lines 29 through 31, Heaney directly compares poetry writing to the digging his ancestors did, "Between my finger and my thumb / The squat pen rests. / I'll dig with it."
Rule: Block indent the poem ten spaces on the left margin.
Example:
The author, David Bottoms, is wise to the fact that men often use sports to communicate their feelings. The persona of the poem, however, takes years to realize his father's message. Once he realizes the importance of sports to their relationship, he sends a message back to his father in lines 20 through 23:

and I never learned what you were laying down.
Like a hand brushed across the bill of a cap,
let this be the sign
I'm getting a grip on the sacrifice.
Rules for Excluding Portions of Poetry
Quoting a Poem Midline
Removing Words from the Middle of a Line
Removing Full Lines of Poetry
three equally spaced points
used in writing or printing
to indicate the omission
of words in a quotation.
Ellipses In
Use
He said, "This ceremony honors twelve brilliant athletes . . . visiting the United States."
2. She said, "I like apples, oranges, and bananas because they are all fruits."
She said, "I like apples, oranges, and bananas . . . ."
1. He said, "This ceremony honors twelve brilliant athletes from the Caribbean who are visiting the United States.
3. He said, "I won three awards. I achieved high academic levels throughout this year. Math, science, and english are my strongest subjects."
He said, "I won three awards. . . . Math, science and english are my strongest subjects."

Side Notes

Plural: Ellipses ( . . . ) , ( . . .)
Singular: Ellipsis ( . . . )
of a quoted sentence do not require

the use of an ellipsis
Rule: If you want to start quoting in the middle of a line of poetry, just add an indention to indicate the text is only a partial line. Do not use ellipses points (. . .).
Example: McDonald paints a picture of a family in pain, but in lines 13 through 16, he
uses images that usually show up in cozier circumstances, such as children reading
the comics:

At dawn
we folded the quilts
and funnies, crept softly
through our chores.
Rule: Use an ellipses to represent the missing text.
Example: As a boy, he visited his grandfather in the fields, and in lines 19 through 21, Heaney states, "Once I carried him milk. . . . / He straightened up / To drink it."
Rule: If you remove one or more full line, use
a line of ellipses to indicate the omission.
Example: In lines 1, 6, 7 , and 8, Hayden states that the persona would wake to hear the fire his father started before dawn:

Sundays too my father got up early
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I'd wake and hear the cold splintering, breaking.
When the rooms were warm, he'd call,
and slowly I would rise and dress.
Citing Single Words from Poetry
Citing Several Single Words
Citing One Word
Rule: If you quote several words or phrases from various places in a poem, list the line numbers after each word.
Example: Roethke uses a variety of words in "My Papa's Waltz" that indicate physical violence, such as "death" (3), "battered" (9), "scraped" (12), "beat" (13), and "hard" (14).
Rule: State the line number if quoting
only one word.
Example: In line 2, when Heaney uses a simile to compare his pen to a "gun," he creates a startling image.
with more than 4 typed lines
FLY SWATTER CHALLENGE
Single Quotation Marks (Quoting Quotations)
Later in chapter one, Dickens describes George and Lennie's dream for the future. Lennie begs George to tell him the story again as he states, "'No, you. I forget some a' the things. Tell how it's gonna be.'
'Ok. Someday - we're gonna get the jack together and we're gonna have a little house and a couple acres,'" George answers, before Lennie interrupts excitedly.
In chapter 2, Nelson says, "I refuse to throw this apple."
"I refuse to throw this apple," Nelson says in chapter 2.
"I refuse to throw
this apple."
Nelson says, "I refuse to throw this apple."
In chapter 2, Nelson says, "this apple is stupid."

"Now it was a herd of diabolic shapes...now a group of shining angels..."
"Well yes, Steven, the correct ans...is that a bunny?"


"I'm not sure what to do..." he said.
Jones's (1998) study found the following:
Students often had difficulty using APA style, especially when it was their first time citing sources. This difficulty could be attributed to the fact that many students failed to purchase a style manual or to ask their teacher for help. (p. 199)




Jones's (1998) study found the following:
Students often had difficulty using APA style, especially when it was their first time citing sources. This difficulty could be attributed to the fact that many students failed to purchase a style manual or to ask their teacher for help. (p. 199)




Jones's (1998) study found the following:
Students often had difficulty using APA style, especially when it was their first time citing sources. This difficulty could be attributed to the fact that many students failed to purchase a style manual or to ask their teacher for help. (p. 199)




Jones's (1998) study found the following:
"Students often had difficulty using APA style, especially when it was their first time citing sources. This difficulty could be attributed to the fact that many students failed to purchase a style manual or to ask their teacher for help. (p. 199)"
She said, "She opened the door...and saw...a cake!"
Eliot immediately engages the reader with his use of the second person in lines 1 and 2, "Let us go then, you and I / When the evening is spread out against the sky."
Eliot immediately engages the reader with his use of the second person in lines 1 and 2:

"Let us go then, you and I / When the evening is spread out against the sky."
Eliot immediately engages the reader with his use of the second person in lines 1 and 2: Let us go then, you and I / When the evening is spread out against the sky.
Eliot immediately engages the reader with his use of the second person in lines 1 and 2 "Let us go then, you and I ; When the evening is spread out against the sky."
"how do I cook the chicken?"


Martha said, "What's up"


In chapter two, Jim says, "I am
not very smart."


In chapter one, Carl yelled, "help
me with this project!"
EXAMPLES

For example, when citing more than four lines of prose, use the following examples:
Nelly Dean treats Heathcliff poorly and dehumanizes him throughout her narration:
They entirely refused to have it in bed with them, or even in their room, and I had no more sense, so, I put it on the landing of the stairs, hoping it would be gone on the morrow. By chance, or else attracted by hearing his voice, it crept to Mr. Earnshaw's door, and there he found it on quitting his chamber. Inquiries were made as to how it got there; I was obliged to confess, and in recompense for my cowardice and inhumanity was sent out of the house. (Bronte 78)

When citing two or more paragraphs, use block quotation format, even if the passage from the paragraphs is less than four lines. Indent the first line of each quoted paragraph an extra quarter inch.
In "American Origins of the Writing-across-the-Curriculum Movement," David Russell argues:
Writing has been an issue in American secondary and higher education since papers and examinations came into wide use in the 1870s, eventually driving out formal recitation and oral examination. . . .
From its birth in the late nineteenth century, progressive education has wrestled with the conflict within industrial society between pressure to increase specialization of knowledge and of professional work (upholding disciplinary standards) and pressure to integrate more fully an ever-widerning number of citizes into intellectually meaningful activity within mass society (promoting social equity). . . . (3)


For example, when citing more than four lines of prose, use the following examples:

Nelly Dean treats Heathcliff poorly and dehumanizes him throughout her narration:
They entirely refused to have it in bed with them, or even in their room, and I had no more sense, so, I put it on the landing of the stairs, hoping it would be gone on the morrow. By chance, or else attracted by hearing his voice, it crept to Mr. Earnshaw's door, and there he found it on quitting his chamber. Inquiries were made as to how it got there; I was obliged to confess, and in recompense for my cowardice and inhumanity was sent out of the house. (Bronte 78)


When citing two or more paragraphs, use block quotation format, even if the passage from the paragraphs is less than four lines. Indent the first line of each quoted paragraph an extra quarter inch.
In "American Origins of the Writing-across-the-Curriculum Movement," David Russell argues:
Writing has been an issue in American secondary and higher education since papers and examinations came into wide use in the 1870s, eventually driving out formal recitation and oral examination. . . .
From its birth in the late nineteenth century, progressive education has wrestled with the conflict within industrial society between pressure to increase specialization of knowledge and of professional work (upholding disciplinary standards) and pressure to integrate more fully an ever-widerning number of citizes into intellectually meaningful activity within mass society (promoting social equity). . . . (3)

When citing two or more paragraphs, use block quotation format, even if the passage from the paragraphs is less than four lines. Indent the first line of each quoted paragraph an extra quarter inch.

In "American Origins of the Writing-across-the-Curriculum Movement," David Russell argues:
Writing has been an issue in American secondary and higher education since papers and examinations came into wide use in the 1870s, eventually driving out formal recitation and oral examination. . .
From its birth in the late nineteenth century, progressive education has wrestled with the conflict within industrial society between pressure to increase specialization of knowledge and of professional work (upholding disciplinary standards) and pressure to integrate more fully an ever-widerning number of citizes into intellectually meaningful activity within mass society (promoting social equity). . . . (3)
Full transcript