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The Tempest

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Peter Sabath

on 16 July 2015

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Transcript of The Tempest

Background Info: Read Pages 36-37 in Collections Text

Notes:

During Shakespeare's lifetime, the first permanent European settlements were being founded in American (early 1600's - time of John Smith and William Bradford)
In 1607, just four years before completing The Tempest, the Jamestown colony was established by English colonists, and Shakespeare knew some of these men!
Shakespeare read the journals of these settlers back in England and he was fascinated by how the lives of colonists and Native Americans intersected
The setting and events of The Tempest may have been inspired by the experiences of these early colonists
Intro
Warm up: Screen Act 1 overview. Takes notes on major events from Act 1 and quickly review major characters in the play before taking character quiz.
Act 1
Warm-up: Screen Act 2 Overview. Take notes on major events in Act 2.
Act 2
Writing a Literary Analysis Essay
Performance Task
Background
Reading the Play
Writing about the Play
by William Shakespeare
The Tempest (Acts 1 and 2)
Notes Continued...

Shakespeare wrote during the Elizabethan England period and lived from 1564-1616
The Tempest was finished in 1611
The first successful colony of Jamestown in 1607 marked the beginning of thousands of people coming to North American from England for commercial gain or to experience religious liberty
Shakespeare was very interested in the New World and the play wove in his knowledge of the first colony, for he knew the leaders of Virginia Company that financed the ships that first sailed to North America in the early 1600's
The play opens with a storm causing a shipwreck
In fact, one of the company's ships, the Sea Venture, was separated from the fleet durign a violent storm off the Bermudas
It arrived a year later in Jamestown after the crew build two small ships to continue their travels after being shipwrecked in Bermuda
View Shakespeare Bio

- video, page 37 in Collections eBook
Warm-up:

Screen the trailer for the big-screen adaptation of Shakespeare's The Tempest.

Question: Based on the trailer, what do you think this play is going to be about? Use evidence from the trailer to support your response.
Summary
Themes
Characters
Prospero
So What's the Tempest All About?

In a Nutshell:

Written between 1610 and 1611, The Tempest is William Shakespeare's final play. In it, Shakespeare portrays an aging magician who has been living in exile with his young daughter on a remote island for the past twelve years. Over the course of a single day, Prospero uses his magic to whip up a tempest to shipwreck the men responsible for his banishment. He then proceeds to dazzle and dismay the survivors (and the audience) with his art as he orchestrates his triumphant return home where he plans to retire in peace.
Prospero:

Prospero is the ousted Duke of Milan who has been living in exile on a remote island for the past twelve years. He's also a powerful magician, father of Miranda, master of Ariel and Caliban, and a guy who really likes his books.

Throughout the play Prospero uses his magic to whip up a dramatic storm, to put on a dazzling wedding entertainment, to bully his servants, to manipulate his enemies, and to orchestrate his daughter's marriage to the Prince of Naples.
Caliban: Prospero's Native Slave

"Hag-born" "whelp," not "honoured with human shape."
"Demi-devil."
"Poor credulous monster."
"Hag-seed."
"Strange fish."

These are just a few descriptions of Caliban, one of the most debated figures in all of Shakespeare. Is this cursing, would-be rapist and wannabe killer nothing but a monster? Or, is this belligerent, iambic pentameter speaking slave worthy of our sympathy? Is Caliban the "noble savage"? Is he symbolic of the victims of colonial expansion and injustice?

He is the symbol of the "Native American" on the island that the "civilized" man uses and tames, treating him like a servant slave.
Miranda:

Miranda is the virginal, fifteen-year-old daughter of Prospero. (We know her age because her dad says she wasn't yet three years old when they landed on the island and twelve years have passed since then. We know she's a virgin because everyone in the play is always talking about it. After spending a dozen years on a remote island with her old man and the hideous slave Caliban, Miranda falls in love at first sight the moment she lays her eyes on the oh-so-dreamy Prince of Naples.


Gonzalo:

Gonzalo is "an honest old counsellor of Naples." He's travelling with the King's party when he's shipwrecked with the other passengers on Prospero's island.

The thing to know about Gonzalo is that he's a really good guy with an optimistic outlook on life – kind of like Dory in Finding Nemo, but with a beard instead of fins. The first time we meet Gonzalo, he's trying to break up a nasty argument between the royals and the mariners on deck during the tempest. While everyone around him is bickering and worrying about drowning, Gonzalo keeps his cool and says he's sure "good Fate" has something other than drowning in store for everyone on board the ship.

We also know that, when Prospero was booted out of Italy and set adrift with his infant daughter, Gonzalo was the one who made sure Prospero had enough food and water to survive. Gonzalo didn't just make sure Prospero would have supplies to physically sustain him, he also made sure Prospero had fancy linens and books – the kinds of things that would keep a guy like Prospero comfortable.
Ariel:
Ariel is Prospero's "tricksy" spirit servant and attends to Prospero's every need. Unlike Caliban, Ariel has a (mostly) warm and loving relationship with Prospero, who saved Ariel when he arrived on the island. (The evil witch Sycorax imprisoned Ariel in a tree because the "delicate" spirit didn't have the heart to do her bidding.)

Even though Ariel is affectionate toward Prospero, we learn early on that Ariel isn't a servant by nature; he primarily wants his liberty, but, knowing that it will come, serves Prospero wholeheartedly and happily.

Ariel is notable for his use of white magic in the play, but also for his empathy and goodness. These traits are lacking in some of the play's human characters, and Ariel's feelings only make that fact more conspicuous. Most telling is his report on the three traitors: Antonio, Sebastian, and Alonso.
King Alonso:

Alonso, the King of Naples, is not a particularly good guy, but not a particularly bad one, either. We know he was an enemy of Prospero, but the first we hear of the King is that he was easily swayed by Antonio's self-interested flattery.

Alonso is easily moved one way or another, sometimes giving up his son for dead and other times searching for him doggedly. Gonzalo can sway him in one direction (towards good) when he speaks, but we know Antonio's wicked flattery also worked on the King before. That Alonso keeps Antonio and Sebastian, willing traitors, so close to him is evidence that he is at once trusting and naïve, in addition to being a horrible judge of character.
Prince Ferdinand:

Prince Ferdinand is Alonso's son and the heir to the throne of Naples. He is quick to love, and seemingly quick to forget his father's "death," but it does seem that his heart is true and his affections, though quick, are genuine. He does have a sort of princely arrogance about him.

We learn about Ferdinand mostly through his efforts to gain Miranda from Prospero. Ferdinand is happy in his labors, blinded by love, and quick to promise the title of queen and wife to a girl before he even knows her name. He also vows to stay true to her father, Prospero, and not violate Miranda's chastity before their wedding night – maybe because he's a good guy, maybe because Prospero threatens that the heavens will rain down fire and brimstone on him.
Sebastian and Antonio:

This pair can mainly be dealt with together, since nearly all of their lines are together, and their action is matched. They're also in similar positions, as both are traitorous younger brothers. Antonio is Prospero's brother, who betrayed him to have the dukedom; Sebastian is younger brother to King Alonso of Naples, and is interested in stealing Alonso's throne. They work well together because Sebastian is prone to fooling around in a mean-spirited way and Antonio earns Sebastian's trust and respect by also being a horrible human being. When Sebastian is moved to murder his own brother, it is at the suggestion of the traitorous Antonio.

In their last lines in the play, Sebastian and Antonio mock Trinculo and Stefano (who are basically their reflections). They show they have learned absolutely nothing, have no remorse, and do not wish to be forgiven, because they see nothing wrong with themselves. Their plot against the King, their lack of remorse, and their wickedness in general characterize them as bad seeds.
Close Reading Activities:
1. Screen/Read Act 1 (pp. 39 - 57) and volunteers act out Act using No Fear Shakespeare translation on iPads
2. Reading Focus:
Look for passages that relate to the experience of coming to a new land with unfamiliar sights and people.

Take notes in classwork section of portfolios. Write down examples of textual support (five quotes) with page numbers and explain how the quotes deal with coming to a new land.
See character overview on page 38 of Collections textbook
Create a T-Chart like this to take notes on...
The Tempest: Act 1
Textual Support: Examples of coming to a land with unfamiliar sights and people
Explanation of Quotes
1
2
3
4
5
Support: Use iPads and No Fear Shakespeare website to tackle text, citing modern-day translations to clarify meaning -

http://nfs.sparknotes.com/tempest/
Screen BBC production of Act 1 as students read, pausing in important passages to complete CLOSE READING tasks
Closure: Students share annotations and close reading notes from T-charts
Close Reading Activities:
1. Screen/Read Act 1 (pp. 58 - 68) and student volunteers act out lines using No Fear Shakespeare modern-day translations.
2. Reading Focus:
Look for passages that relate to the experience of coming to a new land with unfamiliar sights and people.

Take notes in classwork section of portfolios. Write down examples of textual support (five quotes) with page numbers and explain how the quotes deal with coming to a new land.
Create a T-Chart like this to take notes on...
Screen BBC production of Act 1 as students read, pausing in important passages to complete CLOSE READING tasks
Support: Use iPads and No Fear Shakespeare website to tackle text, citing modern-day translations to clarify meaning -

http://nfs.sparknotes.com/tempest/
The Tempest: Act 2
Textual Support: Examples of coming to a land with unfamiliar sights and people
Explanation of Quotes
Closure:
Collaborative Discussion - Which passages (you should have a total of 10) about coming to a new land were most interesting to you? Explain why the passages drew your interest and whether you think they reflect the actual experience of explorers who came to America.
Assessment:

Take assessment on The Tempest. See assignment on Edmodo and complete in class.
Homework:

Complete Analyzing the Text study questions 1-7 on page 70.
Task/Writing Prompt: In short five-paragraph essay, discuss how Shakespeare’s play The Tempest explores the experiences of coming to a new land with unfamiliar sights and people. How does the play reflect the experiences of the first American settlers in the 1600’s, which Shakespeare followed closely when we wrote The Tempest? Using your close reading notes from Acts I and II, discuss specific passages (quotes) from the play in which you see parallels between characters and events in The Tempest and the experiences of early explorers and colonists in the 1600’s. Make sure you discuss events from Of a Plymouth Plantation and The General History of Virginia, citing Brandford’s and Smith’s accounts of early life in America.
See assignment on Edmodo for overview of task, brainstorming exercises, essay outline, and paragraph templates that you can use to help you write this essay
Writing/Film Studies Day (time permitting in class or at home if we run out of time):

Screen modern-day film adaptation of The Tempest as we work on outlining and writing essays.
Warm-up Day 4

Check study questions 1-8 page 70
3 Categories of Characters:

1. DEPOSED
Prospero
(Shakespere) - exiled duke who has lived on island with daughter for 12 years; sorcerer/magician who controls events on the island
Miranda
- Pospero's daughter; symbol of innocence and wonder

2. SHIPWRECKED
Alonso
- king who is a combination of good and evil
Ferdinand
- son of Alonso; prince and future king; falls in love with Miranda when he gets separated from the others after the shipwreck
Antonio
- Prospero's bro who took over his duke position and wants to kill King Alonso; main villain
Sebastian
- Alonso's bro who agrees to kill king (his own bro) when encouraged by Antonio
Trinculo
- Alonso's jester who plots with Caliban to murder Prospero; a drunk
Stephano
- Alonso's butler who plots with Caliban to murder Prospero; a drunk and fool
Gonzalo
- Honest lord who helped Prospero survive on boat after sent in exile; force of good and purity in the play

3. SUPERNATURAL CREATURES
Ariel
- spirit that Prospero freed from tree who helps Prospero with his magic in exchange for promised freedom
Caliban
- Prospero's slave on the island; half witch and half devil; symbol of the Native American captive

Key Idea: The Tempest is a story of brothers backstabbing brothers to gain power and control....and one brother (Prospero ) setting things straight with his magical powers...
Family Trees
Prospero (exiled duke)
Miranda
father/daughter
Antonio (duke)
brothers
He takes Prospero's position of dukedom and gets King to banish his brother from Italy
Alonso (king)
Sebastian
brothers
Ferdinand (prince)
father/son
Wants to kill his bro with Antonio so he can become king because they think Prince Ferdinand is dead, the heir to the throne
Family #1
Family #2
Character Quiz - See Kahoot! and take quiz using iPads

Instructions:

1. On your iPad, go to
kahoot.it
on your Google Chrome browser and join the game with the game pin provided!

2. Use your FIRST and LAST name to enter the game, please!
Full transcript