Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

GOTHIC MINDMAP

No description
by

Thomas Mahony

on 21 May 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of GOTHIC MINDMAP

BRAM STOKER DRACULA Fear, in the Gothic genre is naturally a primary factor of influence. This is often in response to the supernatural and can be severely overwhelming and inexplicable in some circumstances.

"It may have been that his breath rank, but a horrible feeling of nausea came over me, that do what I would I could not conceal.."

Here we see Harker severely and thus far inexplicably affected by the supernatural to the point of physical distress.
This fear in this case is used to instill in the reader a discomfort within the supernatural's embodiment, even before we are aware of their supernatural power. Fear The Sublime in the Gothic Genre is an asserting of the near incomparable, overwhelming power of nature, to the point of inspiration of extreme awe and reverence, or contrarily extreme fright and terror.

"A dog began to howl somewhere in a farmhouse far down the road, a long agonized wailing, as if from fear. The sound was taken up by another dog, and then another, and another, till, borne on the wind which now sighed softly through the pass, a wild howling began, which seemed to come from all over the country, as far as the imagination could grasp it from the gloom of the night.

This invokes in our protagonist a sense of extreme, and otherwise unwarranted terror, in response to the ambiguous connotations of a natural occurrence.

The Sublime The technique of pathetic fallacy embodies an addressing of certain ordinary or inanimate happenings as having prophetic qualities.


"...In the heavy oppressive sense of thunder..It seemed as though the mountain rage had separated into two atmospheres and we had entered the thunderous one"


This gothic technique generally has ominous implications, and also commonly uses the weather to enable easily descriptive communication of them. Pathetic Fallacy The presentation through a gothic text of the fantastical. This being something that defies the laws of nature

DRACULA: - Has no reflection
- Thirst for human blood
- Fears blue flame
- Prodigious strength and endurance
"There are such beings as vampires, some of us have evidence that they exist. Even had we not the proof of our own unhappy experience, the teachings and the records of the past give proof enough for sane peoples."

The protagonist, as in Dracula, is generally shown in distinct opposition to a supernatural antagonist and must, in their success, restore order to god. The Supernatural The loss of innocence in the midst of evil is an almost entirely necessary theme of the gothic genre, sometimes drawing reference to religious themes of of temptation.

"..and so it make it hard that I must kill her in her sleep"

This quote refers to a moment before Dracula strikes upon his prey, turning a beloved character, Lucy, into a to-be-detested vampire.
Dracula makes a strong point of this desecration of purity, highlighting it among its subject matter. Desecration of Innocence/
Purity Romance appears more than frequently within works of the gothic genre. This said, however, this romance is almost always tainted by some intrinsically twisted undertone, generally regarding the supernatural.

"The fair girl went on her knees and bent over me, fairly gloating. There was a deliberate voluptuousness which was both thrilling and repulsive, and as she arched her neck she actually licked her lips like an animal.."

This, as is regularly done in Dracula, sees romance employed malevolently by an antagonist as a means for supernatural
desecration of innocence.

Romance EDGAR ALLEN POE The Raven Fear, in the Gothic genre is naturally a primary factor of influence. This is often in response to the supernatural and can be severely overwhelming and inexplicable in some circumstances.

Fear in 'The Raven' is too inspired by the supernatural, but is come to more internally than as a reaction to the external. This fear is not immediately evident as it is in Dracula, and is only reached after much speculation on part of the protagonist.

"bird or fiend! I shrieked upstarting,
Get thee back into the tempest.." Fear The Sublime in the
Gothic Genre is an asserting of the near incomparable, overwhelming power of nature, to the point of inspiration of extreme awe and reverence, or contrarily extreme fright and terror.

This technique is used in The Raven contrastingly to its employment in Dracula.

"Whether tempter sent or tempest tossed thee here ashore"

This line of the poem suggests a belief that a storm has delivered to the protagonist the malevolent creature that he is so haunted by. The Sublime The technique of pathetic fallacy embodies
an addressing of certain ordinary or inanimate happenings as having prophetic qualities.

"Once upon a midnight dreary.."
"It was in the bleak December.."

These phrases both serve to suggest that the setting complemented the happening of the events that took place.

Poe also more directly addresses pathetic fallacy stating: "Prophet, said I, thing of evil, Prophet still if bird or devil.." Pathetic Fallacy The presentation through a gothic
text of the fantastical. This being something that defies the laws of nature

The Raven, similarly to Dracula, presents the supernatural as an antagonist, if a more discreet one. It also embodies the piece's entire conflict. The Raven's Raven, depicted as having human qualities(the ability to speak) and in characteristically gothic style presenting itself as the cause for the protagonist's mental unhinging.

"Quoth the raven, 'nevermore'." The Supernatural The loss of innocence in the midst of evil is
an almost entirely necessary theme of the gothic genre, sometimes drawing reference to religious themes of of temptation.

This concept in the Raven is more closely acquainted only to the desecration of purity rather than innocence. The Raven sees our protagonist unhinged at its disposal, haunting the character forever.

"And the raven...still is sitting...just above my chamber door." Desecration of Innocence/
Purity Romance appears more than frequently within works of the gothic genre.
This said however, this romance is almost always tainted by some intrinsically twisted undertone, generally regarding the supernatural.

Romance is most prominent with the Raven, featuring heavily the protagonist's loss of an evidently irrevocable love, seeing him fall into the clutches of insanity.
This romance, similarly to Dracula though by way of an entirely differing plot provokes a desecration of innocence

"Respite - respite and nepenthe from thy memories of Lenore!
Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe, and forget this lost Lenore!'
Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'"
Romance THE GOTHIC GENRE TM An Interesting Critical Reading http://salempress.com/store/pdfs/dracula_critical_insights.pdf

Regards modernity and anxiety - Gothic
Full transcript