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Week 3 Lesson 2: The Fundamental Laws

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Liam Brooks

on 10 February 2017

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Transcript of Week 3 Lesson 2: The Fundamental Laws

Week 3 Lesson 2: The Fundamental Laws
Recap: Kahoot Jumble for Bloody Sunday
GOAL!
Historical Interpretations

•Pipes:
“In the end Russia gained no more than abreathing spell.”

•Trotsky:
“Although with a few broken ribs,Tsarism came out of the experience of 1905 aliveand strong enough.”

•Figes:
“...although the regime succeeded inrestoring order, it could not hope to put the clockback. 1905 had changed society for good. Manyof the younger comrades of 1905 were the eldersof 1917. They were inspired by its memory andinstructed by its lessons.”
Thank you!
Recap of 1905 Revolution and October Manifesto
October Manifesto

•17th October 1905

•Drafted by Witte and Obolensky

•Tsar promised an elected assembly (British model)

•Representative parliament delivered – Duma

•Prime Minister – Witte

•Civil rights and freedoms expanded

Consider:
Did Tsar Nicholas II provide genuine reform or simply appeasement?
Activity 1: Venn Diagram
1. Working individually.

2. Read both the October Manifesto and the Fundamental Laws (Text A & B).

3. Complete a Venn Diagram with similarities and differences between the two documents.

4. We have 20 minutes.

5. Class discussion to follow.
Interpretations of the Reform and Change
•Differing opinions of reform

•Soviets, Socialist parties and workers movements – felt changes were not genuine reform

•Octobrists – group of moderates and conservatives, pleased with long-overdue changes

•Liberal parties, Kadets – divided opinion, pursued further reform

•Gap between factions further divided

•Industrial workers – focussed on immediate needs; eight hour working day, elected workers’ councils, medical care

•Peasants – focussed on immediate concerns; land and tax reform

•Both largely disengaged with wider push for political reform
Further Uprisings
Despite reforms, any opposition crushed

•6th December 1905 Soviet uprisings in Moscow, ended by troops on 18th December

•Over 1000 people killed

•Soviet headquarters stormed, Trotsky and key figures arrested

•Severely limited Soviet influence
1906 – The Fundamental Laws

LI:
To understand the significance of the Fundamental Laws.

SC:
To evaluate the significance of the Fundamental Laws in contributing to the development of the Russian Revolution.

1906 – The Fundamental Laws

LI: To understand the significance of the Fundamental Laws.

SC: To evaluate the significance of the Fundamental Laws in contributing to the development of the Russian Revolution.


1. Go to www.kahoot.it

2. Put in the game code on the screen.

3. Create username.

4. Play.
Activity 2: Researching the Four Dumas.


1. Working in groups of four.

2. Allocate a Duma to each person (i.e. Luae will research the 1st, Erem the 2nd etc.)

3. Research the questions on your sheet (dot points is fine).

4. You'll have 20 minutes.

5. Each person will present the information on their Duma to their table group.
Full transcript