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Iambic Pentameter/Sonnets

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Laura Randazzo

on 20 April 2015

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Transcript of Iambic Pentameter/Sonnets

Shakespearean Sonnets
Iambic Pentameter
Genius at Work
My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red than her lips’ red;
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen roses damask’d, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
I grant I never saw a goddess go;
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground:
And yet, by heav’n, I think my love as rare
As any she belied with false compare.
Sonnet 130
1
Shall I compare thee to a summer’s
day
?
2
Thou art more lovely and more
temperate
:
3
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of
May,

4
And summer’s lease hath all too short a
date
:
5
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven
shines
,
6
And often is his gold complexion
dimm’d
;
7
And every fair from fair sometime
declines
,
8
By chance or nature’s changing course
untrimm’d
;
9
But thy eternal summer shall not
fade

10
Nor lose possession of that fair thou
owest
;
11
Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his
shade
,
12
When in eternal lines to time thou
growest
:
13
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
14
So long lives this and this gives life to thee.
Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm’d;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature’s changing course untrimm’d;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this and this gives life to thee.
Sonnet 18
Structure
14
lines in the poem
syllables (or "beats") per line
Rhyme Scheme
a
b
a
b
c
d
c
d
e
f
e
f
g
g
The heartbeat or tick-tock rhythm of iambic pentameter can be heard in the opening line of
Shakespeare's Sonnet 12:
abuse
begin
control
declare
engulf
ferment
giraffe
harass
inside
lacrosse
mistake
neglect
obey
perhaps
quiesce
resist
suppose
tonight
unless
vaccine
within
xylene
yourself
Zaire
154
10
Do you know what this is?
That's right! A metronome.
Musicians use this to keep the beat.
You have a metronome right inside your chest...
Using two fingers,
find your pulse on your neck or wrist.
What's the sound?
da DUM, da DUM, da DUM
The "da DUM" of a human heartbeat is the most common example of an iambic rhythm.
2 syllables – first one is
soft
, second one is
heavy
Shakespeare used five of these iambs
(or, two-syllable beats) in each line of his sonnets.
This is called
"two-syllable (soft/heavy) step"
"penta = five" "meter = feet/steps"
So, Will's backbeat is:
da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM
Go ahead and clap it out.
You know you want to.
When I do count the clock that tells the time
when
I
do
COUNT
the
CLOCK
that
TELLS
the
TIME
Notice: Every second syllable is the heavier one.
This makes the entire line iambic.
Since there are five of these groupings, it's
iambic pentameter
.
Single words and small phrases can be iambic
trapeze
fall down
go boom
get up
again
Ex:
MORE IAMBIC WORDS
From
A
to
Z
total number of sonnets
Shakespeare wrote
(The most famous one, of course...)
a
b
a
b
c
d
c
d
e
f
e
f
g
g
Sonnet 18: Deconstructed
So, that one was the most famous, but this one is the most fun.
As I read it aloud, see if you can glean the meaning...
da DUM da DUM da DUM
Full transcript