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Sonnet 62

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Ysabelle Gatchalian

on 17 May 2011

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Transcript of Sonnet 62

Sonnet 62 Sin of self-love possesseth all mine eye Sin of self-love possesseth all mine eye
And all my soul and all my every part;
And for this sin there is no remedy,
It is so grounded inward in my heart.
Methinks no face so gracious is as mine,
No shape so true, no truth of such account;
And for myself mine own worth do define,
As I all other in all worths surmount.
But when my glass shows me myself indeed,
Beated and chopp'd with tann'd antiquity,
Mine own self-love quite contrary I read;
Self so self-love were iniquity.
'Tis thee, myself, that for myself I praise,
Painting my age with beauty of thy days Muse Shakespeare himself Central Idea He loves himself too much He is aware that he is getting old, but he still
thinks he's 'beautiful' Sin of self-love possesseth all mine eye
And all my soul and all my every part;
And for this sin there is no remedy,
It is so grounded inward in my heart.
Methinks no face so gracious is as mine,
No shape so true, no truth of such account;
And for myself mine own worth do define,
As I all other in all worths surmount.
But when my glass shows me myself indeed,
Beated and chopp'd with tann'd antiquity,
Mine own self-love quite contrary I read;
Self so self-love were iniquity.
'Tis thee, myself, that for myself I praise,
Painting my age with beauty of thy days Literary Devices Sin of self-love possesseth all mine eye
And all my soul and all my every part;
And for this sin there is no remedy,
It is so grounded inward in my heart.
Methinks no face so gracious is as mine,
No shape so true, no truth of such account;
And for myself mine own worth do define,
As I all other in all worths surmount.
But when my glass shows me myself indeed,
Beated and chopp'd with tann'd antiquity,
Mine own self-love quite contrary I read;
Self so self-love were iniquity.
'Tis thee, myself, that for myself I praise,
Painting my age with beauty of thy days Sin of self-love possesseth all mine eye
And all my soul and all my every part;
And for this sin there is no remedy,
It is so grounded inward in my heart.
Methinks no face so gracious is as mine,
No shape so true, no truth of such account;
And for myself mine own worth do define,
As I all other in all worths surmount.
But when my glass shows me myself indeed,
Beated and chopp'd with tann'd antiquity,
Mine own self-love quite contrary I read;
Self so self-love were iniquity.
'Tis thee, myself, that for myself I praise,
Painting my age with beauty of thy days Sin of self-love possesseth all mine eye
And all my soul and all my every part;
And for this sin there is no remedy,
It is so grounded inward in my heart.
Methinks no face so gracious is as mine,
No shape so true, no truth of such account;
And for myself mine own worth do define,
As I all other in all worths surmount.
But when my glass shows me myself indeed,
Beated and chopp'd with tann'd antiquity,
Mine own self-love quite contrary I read;
Self so self-love were iniquity.
'Tis thee, myself, that for myself I praise,
Painting my age with beauty of thy days Sin of self-love possesseth all mine eye
And all my soul and all my every part;
And for this sin there is no remedy,
It is so grounded inward in my heart.
Methinks no face so gracious is as mine,
No shape so true, no truth of such account;
And for myself mine own worth do define,
As I all other in all worths surmount.
But when my glass shows me myself indeed,
Beated and chopp'd with tann'd antiquity,
Mine own self-love quite contrary I read;
Self so self-love were iniquity.
'Tis thee, myself, that for myself I praise,
Painting my age with beauty of thy days Sin of self-love possesseth all mine eye
And all my soul and all my every part;
And for this sin there is no remedy,
It is so grounded inward in my heart.
Methinks no face so gracious is as mine,
No shape so true, no truth of such account;
And for myself mine own worth do define,
As I all other in all worths surmount.
But when my glass shows me myself indeed,
Beated and chopp'd with tann'd antiquity,
Mine own self-love quite contrary I read;
Self so self-love were iniquity.
'Tis thee, myself, that for myself I praise,
Painting my age with beauty of thy days Repetition Imperfect Epanalepis Personification Imperfect Anadiplosis Alliteration Sin of self-love possesseth all mine eye
And all my soul and all my every part;
And for this sin there is no remedy,
It is so grounded inward in my heart.
Methinks no face so gracious is as mine,
No shape so true, no truth of such account;
And for myself mine own worth do define,
As I all other in all worths surmount.
But when my glass shows me myself indeed,
Beated and chopp'd with tann'd antiquity,
Mine own self-love quite contrary I read;
Self so self-love were iniquity.
'Tis thee, myself, that for myself I praise,
Painting my age with beauty of thy days Sin of self-love possesseth all mine eye
And all my soul and all my every part;
And for this sin there is no remedy,
It is so grounded inward in my heart.
Methinks no face so gracious is as mine,
No shape so true, no truth of such account;
And for myself mine own worth do define,
As I all other in all worths surmount.
But when my glass shows me myself indeed,
Beated and chopp'd with tann'd antiquity,
Mine own self-love quite contrary I read;
Self so self-love were iniquity.
'Tis thee, myself, that for myself I praise,
Painting my age with beauty of thy days Sin of self-love possesseth all mine eye
And all my soul and all my every part;
And for this sin there is no remedy,
It is so grounded inward in my heart.
Methinks no face so gracious is as mine,
No shape so true, no truth of such account;
And for myself mine own worth do define,
As I all other in all worths surmount.
But when my glass shows me myself indeed,
Beated and chopp'd with tann'd antiquity,
Mine own self-love quite contrary I read;
Self so self-love were iniquity.
'Tis thee, myself, that for myself I praise,
Painting my age with beauty of thy days Repetition Repetition Personification Personification Sin of self-love possesseth all mine eye
And all my soul and all my every part;
And for this sin there is no remedy,
It is so grounded inward in my heart.
Methinks no face so gracious is as mine,
No shape so true, no truth of such account;
And for myself mine own worth do define,
As I all other in all worths surmount.
But when my glass shows me myself indeed,
Beated and chopp'd with tann'd antiquity,
Mine own self-love quite contrary I read;
Self so self-love were iniquity.
'Tis thee, myself, that for myself I praise,
Painting my age with beauty of thy days He possesses self-love
He loves everything about him from soul to body
His love for himself is in vein

He knows he has the beautiful face
Nobody has a face like his
He is worth more than any other man living
He is "better"
When he looks in the mirror
He see's how old he is
Loving himself is a sin
(Which he is aware of)
(Praises himself)
Putting on make-up or creating a painting to preserve his beauty Sonnet 62 Quick Summary of Each Line Significance Significance Significance Significance Significance Significance Significance Significance Images Explanation Explanation Explanation Explanation Explanation The whole sonnet is based on self-love and it relates to the central idea He uses the term myself to address that the sonnet is about him This is a special form of repetition
Shakespeare is emphasizing that he is worth more than any other man He is giving characteristics to his image/reflection when he looks at himself in the mirror To stop his aging, he wants to preserve his 'beauty' through make-up or a painting Emphasizing that everything about him, he loves He is just giving characteristics to his face Making a point that his face is like no one else's Although he loves himself so much and thinks that he is so beautiful, when he looks in the mirror he see's himself for who he really is - a man who is (old) aging and worn out.
Corresponds to Line 9 - 10 Preserving beauty
By pointing his age, he is covering up how old he is (his real age)
Corresponding to Line 14 Self-loving man
Throughout the sonnet, Shakespeare expresses his feelings torwards his 'beauty' and makes a states that he is a self-loving man. Models phyically appear very beautiful, but when they look in the mirror they still see their own flaws, like Shakespeare
Corresponding to Lines 5 - 10 Sin of self-love (evil in the heart)
In the beginning, he expresses in the sonnet that his self-love is so strong, it is considered to him as a sin
Corresponds to Lines 1 - 4 but mainly Lines 3 - 4 But when my glass shows me myself indeed,
Beated and chopp'd with tann'd antiquity, Painting my age with beauty of thy days Sin of self-love possesseth all mine eye
And all my soul and all my every part;
And for this sin there is no remedy,
It is so grounded inward in my heart. Methinks no face so gracious is as mine,
No shape so true, no truth of such account;
And for myself mine own worth do define,
As I all other in all worths surmount.
But when my glass shows me myself indeed,
Beated and chopp'd with tann'd antiquity,
Full transcript