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The Battle of New Orleans

By: Johnny Horton
by

Michelle Bewsher

on 1 December 2010

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Transcript of The Battle of New Orleans

The Battle of New Orleans By: Johnny Horton Setting The American base was in New Orleans so that it would be centered around the mississippi River
The British base was over in Jamacia
The British chose Lake Borgne and bayou Bienvenu for there rout to Battle History vs. Art The lyrics didn’t mention that there were a lot more British soldiers, they said “there must have been a hundred of’em”, there were 11,000 to 14,450 British Soldiers through out the war.
The lyrics also didn’t mention that it wasn’t just the British they were fighting against, the British also had soldiers from Jamaica, Barbados, and Bahamas against the Americans.
In the real battle the Americans won the battle as well in the lyrics, but the lyrics didn’t mention that they signed a peace treaty on January 8th.
There isn’t any lies in the lyrics, mostly just avoiding some smaller things, or parts the writer thought were less important or interesting parts of the battle. Characteristic Stanza (Usually written in quatrains)
"In 1814 we took a little trip
Along with Colonel Jackson down the mighty Mississip.
We took a little bacon and we took a little beans
And we caught the bloody British in the town of New Orleans. Common Language (dialogue used often reflects the speech patterns of time period/location) - a'commin, of'em. Style Content
Narrative (contains plot) -Battle of New Orleans 1812
Violent emotion; War! Conflict; Two countries want the same thing, so who ever wins the war.. wins the land! Poetic Devices Colonel Andrew Jackson was a general in the American army. Jackson's having been commissioned as brigadier general in the regular army gave him command over the seventh military district and was posistioned with volunteers from Georgia, Tennesse and Kentucky to both protect the American south. and also help in acqusistion of new territory. Colonel Jackson was now powerful, and determined on one thing..winnning! Rhyme Scheme Was born in the Carolinas in 1767
Was an amazing young lawyer in Tennessee
He killed a man for slurring at his wife
He was our 7th president
Major general in battle of 1814
Died in June 1845 Colonel Andrew Jackson The poem has a Rhyme Scheme pattern of A,A,B,B - C,D,C,D - E,E,F,F- G,G - D,D- H,H,I,I
The Rhyme Scheme adds a little bit of a bounce, and happiness to the poem. It also
makes the poem bacome more memorable, and catchy. "Along with Colonel Jackson down the mighty Mississip. " Ex. In 1814 we took a little trip (A)
Along with Colonel Jackson down the mississip (A)
We took a little bacon and we took a little beans (B)
And we caught the bloody British in the town of New Orleans(B) Hyperbole This poem uses a hyperbole when talking about the canonon. The poet exaggerates, to give the story a little bit more mistery and triumph. He insuates that the Americans didn't give up, and didn't care what they had to do to win. Ex.We fired our guns till the barrel melted down
So we grapperd an alligator and fought another round Presentation By: Michelle Bewsher & Cassandra Tripp "...down the mighty Mississip" Characters American Army British Army The British Army had approximitly 11,000-14,450
soldiers, these men include those who faught Napolean, in Europe and vetrains who had faught in other battles of the war of 1812. Amongst the British Army were the First and Fifth West Indian Regiments, made up of about one thousand black soldiers from Jamaica, Barbados, and the Bahamas. BATTLE MAP! PLOT! The American Army consited of somwhere between 3,500 and 5,000 soldiers, not nearly as many as Britians Army. Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana militia; Baratarian pirates; Choctaw warriors; and free black soldiers came and faught for New Orleans. "We took a little bacon and we took a little beans"
- "We" means the American Army "We fired our guns and the British kept a-comin" In 1814 the British army planed to capture the port of New Orleans in which doing so would grant the British control of the great Mississippi river leaving the Americans with no route to the Gulf of Mexico and further. Colonel Andrew Jackson along with several volentary men who were ready to fight for what was rightfuly theres traveled along the Mississippi River. In 1814 we took a little trip
Along with Colonel Jackson down the mighty Mississip
We took a little bacon and we took a little beans
And we caught the bloody British in the town of New Orleans

[chorus]
We fired our guns and the British kept a'comin'
There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago
We fired once more and they began to runnin'
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico

We looked down the river and we seed the British come
And there must have been a hundred of 'em beatin' on the drum
They stepped so high and they made their bugles ring
We stood behind our cotton bales and didn't say a thing

[Chorus]

Old Hickory said we could take 'em by surprise
If we didn't fire our muskets till we looked 'em in the eyes
We held our fire till we seed their faces well
Then we opened up our squirrel guns and gave 'em..
Well... we...

[Chorus]

Yeah they ran through the briars and they ran through the brambles
And they ran through the bushes where a rabbit couldn't go
They ran so fast that the hounds couldn't catch 'em
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico

We fired our cannon till the barrel melted down
So we grabbed an alligator and we fought another round
We filled his head with cannonballs 'n' powdered his behind
And when we touched the powder off, the gator lost his mind

[Chorus]

Yeah they ran through the briars and they ran through the brambles
And they ran through the bushes where a rabbit couldn't go
They ran so fast that the hounds couldn't catch 'em
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico Lyrics Colonel Jackson and his army shot at the British Army but the British did not give up. Hut-two-three-four
Sound off, three-four
Hut-two-three-four
Sound off, three-four
Hut-two-three-four
Hut-two-three-four! The END! It was the greatest American victory of the war and it was against the finest of the British army. Sing-songy Rythem The plan was to then do a sprise attack on the British, and wait for them to not be ready but look them in the eyes when they shot them. The British finally gave up, and took off runningreally fast back down the gulf of Mexico Then the poet goes on to say that the American Army never gave up no matter what happened durring the battle.
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