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16th - 17th Century England Celebrations/ Festivals

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by

Shari Williams

on 16 January 2014

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Transcript of 16th - 17th Century England Celebrations/ Festivals

16th - 17th Century England Celebrations/ Festivals
HOLIDAYS AND FESTIVALS
In the Elizabeth era, people always looked forward to celebrating holidays and going to festivals. Their leisure time was limited to hard work after church on Sundays. Some holidays and festivals that they went to or celebrated were:
MEANINGS AND PURPOSES
Leisure and festivals took place on a public church holy day. All these celebrations and holidays have very different meanings and/or purposes than ours today:
MEANINGS AND PURPOSES
APRIL'S FOOL'S DAY
was a day of tricks, jests, and jokes. Like in nowadays.

MAY DAY
was the first day of summer and was celebrated by crowning a
"May Queen"
, a
"Green Man"
and dancing around a maypole.

LAMMASTIDE
is the first day of August. It's customary to bring a loaf of bread to the church.

MICHEALMAS
is just basically the beginning of autumn.

ST. CRISPIN'S DAY
is a day when a new
"King Crispin"
is elected, bonfires and reveals
(disclosure)
were featured in the celebration.

THE LORD MAYOR'S SHOW
is a day when a new
"Lord Mayor"
is appointed every year. A traditional British pageantry an elements of carnival. It is still celebrated today.
MEANINGS AND PURPOSES
HALLOWEEN
was a celebration of the days of the dead. Completely different from how we celebrate it in nowadays.

ACCESSION DAY
is the anniversary of Queen Elizabeth's accession to the throne. It has been a national holiday for years after her death.

THE TWELVE DAYS OF CHRISTMAS
started at sundown and ended on
Epiphany
on January 6th. These are not the twelve days
before
Christmas, they are in fact the twelve days
from
Christmas leading up to
Epiphany
.

EPIPHANY
is in fact a season. It is the climax of the
Advent/Christmas
season. This is an occasion for feasting.
CONCLUSION
All of these days were and still are very important in England and sometimes, some of them are celebrated all around the world today.
Epiphany - January 6th
Candlemas - February - 2nd
Valentine's Day - February 14th
Shrove Tuesday - March 3-9th
April Fool's Day - April 1st
May Day - May 1st
Midsummer - June 21st
Lammastide - August 1st
Michealmas - September 29th
St. Crispin's Day - October 25th
The Lord Mayor's Show - October 28th
Accession Day - November 17th
The 12 Days of Christmas - December 24th
Christmas - LAST QUARTER DAYS OF THE YEAR

CANDLEMAS
was celebrated on the first day of spring, like Groundhog's Day. All Christmas decorations were burned on this day.

VALENTINE'S DAY
was celebrated based on Roman Lupercalia
(a very ancient, possibly pre-Roman pastoral festival).
Roman Lupercalia was an "early version" of Valentine's Day, and was originally celebrated on February 15th. Over the years the meaning of this day has changed.

SHROVE TUESDAY
, apprentices were allowed to run amuck in the city in mobs, wreaking havoc. It cleansed the city of vices before
Lent (a solemn observance in the liturgical year of many Christian denominations).
It is no longer celebrated in this manner.
Full transcript