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HEALTH COURSE: SLEEP & SLEEP DISORDERS

8th grade Health Course
by

A. Kotsev

on 9 October 2015

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Transcript of HEALTH COURSE: SLEEP & SLEEP DISORDERS

Sleep:
Why is it so important?

Why do we sleep?
What would happen if we did not sleep?
Effects of lack of sleep continued
DOES LACK OF SLEEP IMPACT OTHERS?
The the Challenger space shuttle explosion and the Chernobyl nuclear disaster have all been attributed to human errors in which sleep-deprivation played a role.
References
BBC Science & Nature - Human Body and Mind
http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/humanbody/sleep/articles/whatissleep.shtml
http://www.sleepfoundation.org/
http://teenshealth.org/teen/your_body/take_care/how_much_sleep.html#cat20116
How does sleep deprivation affect us?
QUESTION:

Have you ever pulled an all-nighter? How did you feel the next day?
Did you know?
17 hours of sustained wakefulness leads to a decrease in performance equivalent to a blood alcohol level of 0.05% (two glasses of wine)
The Space Shuttle Challenger Explosion
Stage 1:
Falling

asleep
Half asleep, half awake
Slowing down of muscle activity
Slight twitching
Can be awakened easily
Stage 2:
Light

Sleep
Within ten minutes of stage one, we enter stage two, which lasts around 20 minutes.

The breathing pattern and heart rate start to slow down. This period accounts for the largest part of human sleep
Stage 3 : Deep Sleep
Brain produces Delta waves
Breathing & Heart Rate at lowest levels
Rhythmic breathing
limited muscle activity
If awakened during deep sleep, we feel groggy & disoriented
REM Sleep
Sleep Deprivation
Sleep

Disorder

Characteristics
Rapid movement of the eyes
First REM begins about 70-90 minutes after we first fall asleep
Usually have 3 -5 REM episodes per night
Brain is more active perhaps than when we are awake
Period when most memorable dreams occur
Breathing rate and blood pressure rise
Having too little sleep
Chronic or Acute
Long -term SD causes death in lab animals
Can cause fatigue, daytime sleepiness, clumsiness and weight gain.
May be linked to more serious diseases; Heart disease, mental illnesses including psychosis and bipolar disorder.
Excessive Daytime Sleepiness (EDS)
Characteristics
Hypersomnia
Characteristics
Persistent sleepiness
lack of energy - even after apparently adequate night sleep
Sudden involuntary sleep onset
Microsleeps
Excessive amounts of sleepiness - different from feeling tired due to interrupted sleep
repeated naps during day - often inappropriate times (during a meal, conversation or at work)
Naps provide no relief from symptoms
Insomnia
Characteristics
Microsleep
Episode of sleep lasting for a fraction of a second or up to thirty seconds
Often the result of Sleep Deprivation, mental fatigue, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, or hypersomnia
Can occur any time without warning
Symptom of any of several sleep disorders
Persistent difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep despite opportunity
May be due to inadequate quality or quantity of sleep
Followed by functional impairment while awake
Are you getting enough sleep?
Take the online sleep profile to find out.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/humanbody/sleep/profiler/
Sleep Tips & Advice
Developing good sleep habits
What you can do to ensure good sleeping habits
Exercise regularly - but not too close to your bedtime

Don't use your bedroom for studying, eating etc.

Avoid alcohol

Avoid caffeine (chocolate, soda, herbal teas and coffee)

Watch what you eat.

Create a habit of going to bed & waking up at the same time

A fifteen minute nap can be effective.
Scientific Theories
While we still
do not
have all of the answers, there are some reasons we do know of:

To maintain normal levels of cognitive skills, i.e - speech, memory and thinking (brain development)
To maintain psychological well-being
Healing & Repair
Hormone release during sleep
Survival & preservation?
any ideas
Lack of sleep affects our brain's ability to function.
How much sleep do we really need?
Chernobyl Disaster
?
?
WHAT HAPPENS
WHEN WE SLEEP?
Full transcript