Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

"The Universe of Part of Speech"

No description
by

Nati Serrano

on 18 June 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of "The Universe of Part of Speech"

"Conjuctions"
Words that join words or group of words.
Interjections
Word used to express emotion through some kind of exclamation.
Verbs
It is a word that shows action or state of being.
ACTION:
Run, Swim, Jump, Cry, Fall, Dream, etc.
State of being:
Be, appear, seem, feel, etc.
Adverbs
Adverbs modify—describe, restrict, or in some way qualify—verbs, adjectives,
or other adverbs.
Adverbs can also modify clauses, phrases, and entire sentences.
"The Universe of Part of Speech"
Object Pronouns
Indefinite Pronouns.
Possessive Pronouns
Reflexive Pronoun
Demostrative Pronoun
Relative Pronouns
Interrogative Pronouns
Interrogative pronouns are used to ask questions. (The interrogative pronoun represents the thing that the question is about.)
WHO - WHOM - WHOSE - WHICH - WHAT
Who
won the race?
Whom
shall we ask?
Whose
did they take?
Which
is the greater?
What
is that?
(E.g)
We use
who
and
whom
for people, and
which
for things.
Or we can use
that
for people or things.
WHO - WHOM - WHOSE- WHICH - THAT
A relative pronoun is used to start a description for a noun. (This description is called an adjective clause or a relative clause.) The description comes after the noun
The lady
who
made your dress
is waiting outside.
I saw the dog
which
ate the cake.
We did not know the tune

that
had been playing...
The council will meet Professor Dobbs,

from
whom
they expect an apology.
My greatest concern was the tide
, against
which
we stood little chance.

(E.g)
Demonstrative pronouns are used to replace specific people or things that have been previously mentioned.
THIS - THESE / THAT - THOSE
This
is very smelly.
You can smell
that
from here.
These
smell rotten.
Do not paint
those
.
THIS
and
THAT
replace a SINGULAR nouns. /
THESE
and
THOSE
replace a PLURAL nouns.
(E.g)
A
reflexive pronoun
is used with another noun (or pronoun) when something does something to itself.
MYSELF - YOURSELF - HIMSELF - HERSELF
ITSELF - OURSELVES - THEMSELVES
I saw
myself
in the mirror.
Why do you blame
yourself
?
John sent
himself
a copy.
Mary sent
herself
a copy.
My dog hurt
itself
.
We blame
ourselves
.
Can you help
yourselves
?
They cannot look after
themselves
.

(E.g)
Possessive pronouns
show ownership. The term possessive pronoun covers possessive adjectives and absolute possessive pronouns.
MINE - YOURS - HIS - HERS - OURS - THEIRS
This hat is
mine
.
Is this book
yours
?
This belongs to John. It's
his
.
I forgot my book, so Susan gave me
hers
.
Their country is bigger than
ours
.
Our city is as nice as
theirs
.
(E.g)
An
indefinite pronoun
refers to a non-specific person or thing.
The most common ones are
all, any, anyone, anything, each, everybody, everyone, everything, few, many, nobody, none, one, several, some, somebody,
and
someone
.
A classic is
something
that
everybody
wants to have read and
nobody
wants to read. (Mark Twain, 1835-1910)
Of those who say
nothing
,
few
are silent. (Thomas Neill)
Everything
is funny as long as it is happening to
somebody
else. (Will Rogers, 1879-1935)
Everybody
likes a kidder, but
nobody
lends him money. (Arthur Miller, 1915-2005)
I don't know
anything
about music. In my line, you don't have to. (Elvis Presley, 1935-1977)
(E.g)
The seven basic pronouns have one form when they are used as subjects and another form when they are used as objects.
Objects are what is affected by the action of the subject.
ME - YOU - HIM - HER - IT - US - THEM
Horses don't like
me
.
She talks to
us
.
We watch
them
on TV.
(E.g)
PRONOUNS
Is a word that takes the place of one or more nouns. (The Subject)
I - YOU - HE - SHE - IT - WHE - THEY
I
love the music.
You
are a very lucky girl.
She
is smart.
He
is my brother.
It
is a tomatoe.
Whe
are the champions.
They
are my classmates.

Coordinating --- FANBOYS
(
F
or,
A
nd,
N
or,
B
ut,
O
r,
Y
et,
S
o)
Subordinating --- Most common: before, after, during, until, although, because, when, since, than, that, etc.
Although
he's very famous he is still nice.
I like tea
and
coffee.
She goes to the tennis club
because
she likes to play tennis.
He reads magazines,
but
he doesn't like to read books.
Do you like tea
or
coffee?
Since
he's lost his money, he couldn't go to the restaurant.
(E.g)
WHOA! - WOW! - HEY! - OH! - OUCH! (etc)

Oh!
I didn’t know that!”

Er,
that is just aggravating.”

Mmm,
that smells so good.”

Oh God, Batman!
The Joker is back in Gotham!”

Hey!
I’m over here!”
The girl
dances
in the Ballet.
She was
talking
with Mr. Darcy.
I
play
tennis on Mondays.
Does she
know
him?
(E.g)
Often - hardly ever - sometimes - quickly - yesterday
She
runs

quickly
.
I ran
yesteday
.
She
hardly ever
eat candies.
(E.g)
Prepositions
Word or phrase that functions as a connector, uniting a noun (or a word or a group of words functioning as a noun) or a pronoun with another word in the sentence.
The noun being connected is called
the object of the
preposition.
AT - IN - ON - AT - OUT - AMONG - THROUGH - ABOVE - OVER (etc)
Dolphins live

in

the water
Mary stayed
inside
the car
(E.g)
An adjective is a word used to modify — describe, restrict, or somehow qualify — nouns and pronouns.
Adjectives modify
only nouns and pronouns
; they do not
modify other adjectives, verbs, or adverbs.
Adjectives
SLOW - WEIRD - GREEN - LAZY - GIGANTIC, ATHLETIC
(etc)
The
slow
turtle
The
lazy
boy
The
gigantic
house.
A
green
car.
(E.g)
Articles
The articles are classified as adjectives.
The
is called the definite article because it is used to indicate something specific.
A
and
An
are called the indefinite articles because they are used to indicate something unspecific.
A - AN - THE
I need
a
picture-hook to hang ths picture.
I want
an
apple.
I want
the
red apple.

(E.g)
Nouns
A noun is a word used to represent general classes of people, places, and things or something a bit more intangible, such as ideas.
Common nouns
A general name, place or thing.
Common nouns do not provide specificity or point to
one certain thing or idea.
(E.g):
People:
sister
,
teacher
,
doctor
,
gardener
Places:
town
,
school
,
hospital
,
yard
Things:
shoe
,
pizza
,
radio
,
house
Ideas:
faith
,
beauty
,
truth
,
goodness
Proper nouns
A proper noun, often referred to as a proper
name, is still a noun, but it identifies a specific person, place, or thing.
(E.g)

Mary Jane
lives in
Boston.
Abstract nouns
An abstract noun cannot be seen, felt, heard, smelled or tasted.
(E.g)

Freedom, love, power
.
Countable nouns
Count nouns identify people, places, and things that, simply,
can be counted.
(E.g)

Dolphin, pencil, glasses.
Uncountable nouns
Uncountable nouns name things that
generally
are not counted
, either because
they reference a group of people or things or
because they are abstract.
(E.g)

Junk, sand, flour.
Concrete nouns
Concrete nouns
can be seen, felt, heard, smelled or tasted.
(E.g)

Sugar, dog

Compound nouns
Compound nouns are a type of noun that it's made of
two or more words
that create
one noun.

(E.g)

Six pack, underground, hair cut,
ice-cream.
Collective nouns
Name
groups
, things,
composed of members
, usually people.
(E.g)

Council, Family, Company, Team.
Zero Article
Sometimes though there is no article associated with a noun and this can be called the 'zero' article.
(E.g)

I like butter
NOT
I like
(the)
butter.
Beans are good for you

NOT (The)
Beans are good for you.
Full transcript