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TUNDRA

by

Mateo Pérez

on 3 March 2013

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Transcript of TUNDRA

In the Arctic, soil is always frozen, so large pools of water form on top of the ground. Arctic Tundras are found in the Northern Hemisphere. CLIMATE In the Tundra, temperatures are so low, that it is impossible for trees to grow. It is cold throughout all months of the year, but on Summer, there is a brief period of milder temperatures. The fun part is that during Summer, the sun shines 24 hours a day and it lasts from 6 to 10 weeks.
Temperatures never get any warmer than -6 to -1 degrees Celsius (so, you might need to bring a good leather jacket). Tundras have a precipitation of 38 to 63 cm of rain per year (hardly more than in some deserts). It is very windy and most times winds reach up to 48 to 96 kilometers per hour. On Summer, when the ice melts, it cannot be absorbed back into the ground, this happens because only the upper layers melt. There are TWO types of Tundras: Artic and Alpine TUNDRA NEEL MICHAEL DIEGO MATEO
Even though temperatures can drop to freezing in an Alpine Tundra, the soil is still able to drain water. Alpine Tundras are found on mountains all over the world at such a high altitude that trees cannot grow. -In the Tundra, temperatures are so low, that it is impossible for trees to grow.The Tundra Biome is the coldest of all five world Biomes.
-A Tundra is a treeless area near the Arctic where the ground is always frozen and there's very little plant life.
-Tundras are found just below the ice caps of the Arctic, across North America, in Europe, Siberia and Asia.
-Most of Alaska and almost half of Canada are located in the Tundra Biome.
-Tundras cover about one-fifth of Earth's land surface. WILDLIFE This is a Caribou Artic Fox- A fox that has white leather and can survive in the cold from its heavy coat. It is also the most common. Grand Squirrel- A normal squirrel that lives under dirt and eats insects. You might find there everyday on the Tundra wondering around. Lemming- They are small rodents found in the Tundra. Normally living underground. Moose- The largest extant in the deer family. It is normally the most hunted animal as well as the reindeer. Sled Dog- A dog domesticated by humans which is used for traveling. It is hooked onto a sled to move it. Sometimes used in dog races. Snowshoe Rabbit- A white, common, rabbit. It is one of the Artic Fox's enemies, but, fortunately, it's white leather coat protects him in the white paraise. (Lepus americanus) (Canis lupus familiaris) Polar Bear- (Ursus maritimus) The largest and most deadliest animal in the Tundra. Polar Bears are mammals. Ermine- A short tailed - weasel, native to North America and and to the Tundra Biome. Sea Lion- Live on top of icebergs and hunt penguins. (Otariidae pinnipedia) Killer whale- Mostly called "orca" or "shamu". Found near icebergs under the ocean. These creatures are the deadliest of the Artic seas. (Orcinus orca) (Mustela) Wolverine- The largest land-dwelling species of the family Mustelidae.

(Gulo gulo) (Alopex lagopus) (Sciurus aberti kaibabensis) (Cervidae alces) PLANTLIFE These are Sedges Cotton Grass- Cotton grass is moved around the Tundra by the wind. It is not any different than cotton, it just grows here too. The Bearberry lives in Tundra. They have pale pink and white petals. The plant got the name because the bears like to eat the berries. They have fine hairs on their stems that keep them warm. Bearberry- The Caribou Mosses common name is Caribou Moss and Reindeer Lichen. The genus is called Cladonia and the species is called “rangiferina”. The Caribou Moss also can grow in northern region areas. The Caribou Moss looks like a foamy, gray-green spongy mass. This plant is grown in northern regions around the world. Caribou Moss- Cushion Plants- Cushion Plants grow in low places and they’re all scrunched together so they look like cushions, they grow in Canada, Greenland, and Russia. The plants are protected from the cold because of where they grow and live. Purple Saxifrage- This plant grows in a low, tight clump. It is one of the earliest plants to bloom. The tiny, purple, star-shaped flowers (1 cm wide) often can be seen above the melting snow. This plant is about 10-15 cm tall, with a single flower per stem. The flower heads follow the sun, and the cup-shaped petals help absorb solar energy. Arctic Poppy- Definitelly a NEED-TO-SEE! GEOGRAPHY The tundra has a flat and hilly surface. Plants can't grow tall (trees) because of its permafrost. The top of the soil is melting and turning into little ponds, but this only happens only on Artic Tundras, not on Alpine. The Tundra's geography makes a difference to plants and animals. The people that live in the Tundra are nomadic, which means that they follow their "food" (consisting of Reindeer and Caribou). Iditarod is a type of dog sledge races. It is the most liked and watched event in the Northern regions of the world. In this place you can go climb on the mountains at really high altitudes like the Everest (8850 m) and some do snorkeling at really cold waters, but it's worth it. There are people that like skiing and go to the Tundra, but it is up to the traveler. Many times, people prefer the Tundra because of it's beautiful Ice Hotels, Castles and ice formations. Orange means Tundra Or you could also do this - What to take to the Tundra- -A pair of good, thick socks to protect your feet.
-A good Columbia or North Face coat and jacket.
-Tooth brush, tooth paste.
-Good boots (for snow).
-A well equipped back pack with climbing tools (if you want to climb the icebergs, which you should)
- Some money.
-Remember to dress up in layers, that way you can take off or put on clothe whenever you want to.
-A camera (and extra batteries, because they tend to loose power faster in colder atmospheres)
-Good water-proof gloves.
-Since skiing is very popular in the Alpine, you might need to consider a snowboard or a pair of skis.
-High-SPF sunscreen if you're visiting in summer, because the Sun is still there.
-Pack a flashlight if you're visiting in winter. You'll encounter long hours of absolute darkness.
-If you're there to view wildlife, bring binoculars, as tour companies will try to keep a certain distance to avoid disturbing the animals. "Arctic fox - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Mar. 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arctic_fox>.

"Ermine (heraldry) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Mar. 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ermine_(heraldry)>.

"Kaibab squirrel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Mar. 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaibab_squirrel>.

"Killer whale - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Mar. 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Killer_whale>.

"Lemming - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Mar. 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemming>.

"Polar bear - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Mar. 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polar_bear>.

"Sea lion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Mar. 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_lion>.

"Sled dog - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Mar. 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sled_dog>.

"Snowshoe hare - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Mar. 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snowshoe_hare>.

"Tundra climate." Thurston High School Springfield Oregon. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Mar. 2013. <http://ths.sps.lane.edu/biomes/tundra4/tundra4c.html>.

"Tundra climate." Thurston High School Springfield Oregon. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Mar. 2013. <http://ths.sps.lane.edu/biomes/tundra4/tundra4c.html>.

"Tundra | World | Extreme Climates | Geography | Arctic | Animal | Plant." Kids Chat |

How Arctic Plants Survive." ATHROPOLIS: Home Page of the Throps and the Squallhoots - Story, Songs, Games, MP3, Learn about the Arctic, and More.. N.p., n.d. Web. 1 Mar. 2013. <http://www.athropolis.com/arctic-facts/fact-plants-survive.htm>.

"Plants of the Arctic and Antarctic — Polar Plants — Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears." Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears. N.p., n.d. Web. 1 Mar. 2013. <http://beyondpenguins.ehe.osu.edu/issue/polar-plants/plants-of-the-arctic-and-antarctic>.
Our Bibliography
(Websites) Our Bibliography
(Pictures) MUST - SEE! https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSFIz2-MJDdS57chBYImLZH-aIps-w_ySGQYqNixUecAv2D6fDByA

https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQtvTMT8a_I6iS2eIyZt6vtBbIcc9IawiU4XsTMdiUh5yL9xnXeyg

http://images.nationalgeographic.com/wpf/media-live/photos/000/120/cache/arctic-fox-snow_12097_990x742.jpg

http://www.kaxe.org/programs/images/Phenology/Rotating%20photos/FlyingSquirrel1.jpg

http://birdingfrontiers.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/norway-lemming-1.jpg?w=800

http://moose-hunting-outfitters.com/images/moose-hunting-outfitters.jpg

http://spindrift-sleddogtours.com/s/cc_images/cache_2414295620.jpg?t=1297202415

http://www.animalcorner.co.uk/wildlife/graphics/snowshoe.jpg

http://zooexplorer.files.wordpress.com/2012/02/polar-bear-stock.jpg

http://www.blueplanetbiomes.org/images/mustela_erminea2.jpg

https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQlfHlPrpK3tvAjJ_Y1YC85-IVuUzOOwefvcG60JwwTNUQwaopR

http://www.greatervancouverparks.com/pictures/OrcaJump3_3046.jpg

http://www.fotonostra.com/albums/animales/fotos/gloton.jpg

http://www.david-noble.net/Tasmania/CentralPlateauJan02/CP17.jpg

http://drugline.org/img/drug/2834_2840_2.jpg

http://www.blueplanetbiomes.org/images/caribou_moss.jpg

http://geofreekz1.files.wordpress.com/2008/11/31.jpg

http://www.quarkexpeditions.com/files/imagecache/expedition-image/Images/General_Content_Images/Antarctic/Terri_ExplorersQuest_IceCastle.jpg

http://www.thestarphoenix.com/news/7882630.bin?size=620x400s

http://www.ginnydougary.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2006/11/ice3.jpg

http://skaneatelestalk.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/dog_650.jpg

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8358/8291062411_170240081e.jpg

http://www.hoteldeglace-canada.com/pictures/04_xavier_dachez_3712.jpg

http://earthref.org/drupal/sites/earthref.org/files/imagecache/big/images/users/hstaudigel/IMG_0987.jpg

http://www.obranueva.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/152210750_fd4e716b2c.jpg

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-P0TsLvNzUWI/TX0neL_XxrI/AAAAAAAABVw/7RGh0RvFsmU/s1600/P3120142.JPG Thank you! Thanks! Thank you! Thanks guys!
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