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Diane Arbus - Documentary Photographers

Digital Photography
by

Gabrielle Wilson

on 27 November 2012

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Transcript of Diane Arbus - Documentary Photographers

By Gabrielle Wilson Diane Arbus Biography Diane Arbus lived in New York, and learned photography from her husband. She first started tagging alongside her husband, photographing fashion shots for magazines like Vogue. Soon after, Diane discovered a new interest, and went her own unique direction and changed her point of view to more unusual subjects that she found on her journeys around New York. Some of the places she would go are hotels, public parks, and a morgue which produced a raw, unique quality. She was known for black and white square photographs of unusual, abnormal people, such as transgenders, nudists, dwarfs, giants, circus performers or people who are considered freaks, as she puts it. Her work is known for pressing outside the boundaries of normal, and tasteful art. Diane committed suicide in 1971. Her work is remembered as intense interest. Her life was made into the film, Fur. Young Man with curlers Diane's work also included photographing transgender people,
she said herself that she "going where I'm never been before, photographing people on the fringes of society and finding the astonishing in the common place." Contributions To Photography Diane's work left an impact on photography with her fearless approach on the boundaries of "proper" or "tasteful" art. Her photos were exhibited at the Venice Biennale as the first American photographer. Her work is noticed as an "overwhelming sensation of the American Pavilion".
She's remembered for shooting disturbing, eye-catching pictures, and she was recognized for the power to disturb and unsettle.
She was the first to shoot, and recognize the abnormal as beautiful works of art. This is one of Diane's more famous photos of a child in Central Park with a toy hand grenade. This picture is significant because it was around the time of the Vietnam war, which made it so popular. She had the boy pose for the picture while she was circling around him, and he became impatient, asking Child With Toy Hand Grenade Fig#2. Fig#3. Two Ecstatic Ladies This photo is another example of the unusual work that Diane does. She was known for photographing "people whose normality seems ugly or surreal". In her words, she calls them freaks. This photo is definitely uncommon, not what someone would see everyday. Jewish Giant at Home with his parents. Fig#4 Diane worked with the Carmel family for 10 years in order to get the perfect picture of Eddie and his parents. This is one of her more famous photo's. Fig#5. Identical Twins This photo is a picture of two identical twins. Diane, with her signature touch, she positioned the girls, so it would seem as if they were joined at the hip. Their dad wasn't happy about the way Diane portrayed the girls as intense, and unrecognizable Examples of Diane's Body of Work Fig#7 Fig.#8 Fig.9 Citations Fig#6 what was taking so long, explains his expression. This shows how Diane's worked for the perfect picture with her unique body of work. This photo is significant because even though the two ladies seem abnormal, they are visibly happy. I chose this photo because it's interesting, and unusual to the eye. This photo was later echoed in the movie, "The Shining" Fig#10 Website Reference

N.a. "Diane Arbus." Biography.com. A+E Networks. 2012. Web. 14 Nov 2012. http://www.biography.com/people/diane-arbus-9187461
Multiple Authors. "Diane Arbus." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., 13 Nov 2012. Web. 19 Nov 2012. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diane_Arbus
N.a. “Diane Arbus”. ProFotos.com. Profotos.com. N.d. Web. 22 Nov 2012 http://www.profotos.com/education/referencedesk/masters/masters/dianearbus/dianearbus.shtml Image Reference

Fig. #1. Diane Arbus. Photograph by Allan Arbus from Diane Arbus, “Ashley Black Photohraphy”: Web. 20 Nov. 2012

Fig. #2. Child in the park with a toy grenade. Photograph by Diane Arbus from “Diane Arbus,” Atget Photography.com; Web; 19 Nov. 2012

Fig. #3. Two ecstatic ladies. Photograph by Diane Arbus from “Diane Arbus,” Atget Photography.com; Web; 19 Nov. 2012

Fig.#4. Tattooed man. Photograph by Diane Arbus from “Diane Arbus,” Atget Photography.com; Web; 19 Nov. 2012

Fig#5. Young Man with Curlers. Photograph by Diane Arbus from “Diane Arbus,” Atget Photography.com; Web; 19 Nov. 2012

Fig#6. Identical Twins. Photograph by Diane Arbus from “Diane Arbus” Masters of photography; Web; 22 Nov 2012

Fig#7. Albino Sword Swallower. Photograph by Diane Arbus from “Diane Arbus,” Atget Photography.com; Web; 19 Nov. 2012
Fig#8. Patriotic Young Man With American Flag. Photograph by Diane Arbus from “Diane Arbus” Masters of photography; Web; 22 Nov 2012

Fig#9. Mexican Dwarf. Photograph by Diane Arbus from “Diane Arbus” Masters of photography; Web; 22 Nov 2012

Fig#10. Twins years later. Photograph by Diane Arbus from “Diane Arbus,” Atget Photography.com; Web; 19 Nov. 2012

Fig.#11. Tattooed man at a Carnival. Photograph by Diane Arbus from “Diane Arbus,” Atget Photography.com; Web; 22 Nov.

Fig#12 Jungle Creep. Photograph by Diane Arbus from “Diane Arbus,” Atget Photography.com; Web; 22 Nov 2012

Fig#13 Baby Crying. Photograph by Diane Arbus from “Diane Arbus” Masters of photography; Web; 22 Nov 2012
in the 1960's, when this photo was first published, it was very controversial, because it was very abnormal, and unproper for a man to have manicured nails, curlers and plucked eyebrows. This photo was popular for it's mythical feeling. This is because of the expressions on his parents faces as they look up at him, and it gives the photo a powerful feeling that creates a familiarity with her subjects’ humanity. Fig#11 Diane's Impact on the World Fig#12 Diane changed the way we look at photographs. In the modern day society in her time at her life was very proper, and people of abnormality were looked down upon. Diane brought light to the differences of people, and made it seem interesting, and intriguing. She highlighted the unusual in normal people, and brought out the beauty in abnormal people. Diane's photos shocked, and interested many different types of people, and she started a new genre of photography. Fig#13
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