Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Public Relations 2

Universidad de Guayaquil
by

Miguel Reyes

on 3 July 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Public Relations 2

PUBLIC RELATIONS
Effective public relations skills are essential to so much of the success in private and public spheres. Public relations efforts address how we wish to present ourselves to others and how to deal with the perceptions of who others believe we are. Public relations tactics are useful for large international corporate projects, or something as personal as networking for your own career advancement
GROUP WORK
Part I

Write a PR Plan: Situation Analysis, Research and Goals/Strategy/Objectives of a business. It could be a small business, family business or a multinational business, but You need to have access to key information about Marketing and advertising material. You will be responsible for the development of a public relations campaign. Be on the lookout for companies that are launching new products, new services, or new divisions. Perhaps you're rather pick a company that needs to refresh its image or consumer perception. Each group will make an oral presentation of their campaign before the rest of the class. 10 – 15 pages.
Part II

Write a HR Plan in which you need to capture "the people element" of what an organization is hoping to achieve in the medium to long term, ensuring that:
It has the right people in place
It has the right mix of skills
employees display the right attitudes and behaviours, and employees are developed in the right way.

You need as well to have access to the Human Resources Dept. The organization must be the same for both tasks. 5 – 10 pages.
You will be graded on both the written (content) and oral exposition of this presentation.
Date: Discuss in class about dates to performance.
Feedback
What Is Public Relations?
“Public relations is influencing behaviour to achieve objectives through the effective management of relationships and communications.” (British Institute of Public Relations

Defining Public Relations
“Public relations practice is the art and social science of analyzing trends, predicting their consequences, counseling organization leaders, and implementing planned programs of action which serve both the organization’s and the public’s interest.” (1978 World Assembly of Public Relations in Mexico City and endorsed by 34 national public relations organizations)

The Function of Public Relations
Public relations helps our complex, pluralistic society to reach decisions and function more effectively by contributing to mutual understanding among groups and institutions. It serves to bring private and public policies into harmony.
Public relations serves a wide variety of institutions in society such as businesses, trade unions, government agencies, voluntary associations, foundations, hospitals, schools, colleges and religious institutions. To achieve their goals, these institutions must develop effective relationships with many different audiences or publics such as employees, members, customers, local communities, shareholders and other institutions, and with society at large.
The managements of institutions need to understand the attitudes and values of their publics in order to achieve institutional goals

Summary
This chapter has provided an introduction to the purpose of public relations. Although the public relations function goes by many different names, it is essential to understand that it is a unique management function that contributes to an organization’s success through its focus on developing and maintaining relationships with key publics.

Those publics are generally employees, financial stakeholders or shareholders, communities, governments at many levels, and the media. It is also important not to confuse the overall purpose of public relations with its subfunctions, such as publicity and media relations.

Group Work (in Class)
Please read the next case about Toyota and answer the following questions:

What was the main reason for public's discontent?
What would you do to prevent future situations like this one?
Set a new goal and 2 new objectives for Toyota.
Why is important a good relationship between the publics in this case?

The Subfunctions of Public Relations
Although there are many subfunctions that make up public relations, most people would identify two major types, corporate and agency. Corporate, or “in-house,” is a part of the organization or business.

It functions to create relationships between an organization and its various publics. The second type of subfunction is associated with the public relations agency; its purpose is to assist organizations in a specific area of expertise.

Reaching your target audience
Your target audience is the people who may be potentially interested in the business’ products or services. They could be customers, potential customers, stakeholders, clients and more.

It’s important, particularly in PR, to identify who your target audience is to help you direct your messages and communication to the right people in a way that is meaningful to them.

Once you have identified your target audience you can create a PR strategy to communicate with them. This will help you to build a relationship with them, encourage them to become customers, build their brand awareness and increase your sales leads.
Ec. Miguel Reyes Aguilar, MSc.
Universidad de Guayaquil

Key Words
Deliberate:
Public relations activity is intentional. It is designed to influence, gain understanding, provide information, and obtain feedback from those affected by the activity.
Planned:
Public relations activity is organized. Solutions to problems are discovered and logistics are thought out, with the activity taking place over a period of time. It is systematic, requiring research and analysis.
Performance:
Effective public relations is based on actual policies and performance. No amount of public relations will generate goodwill and support if the organization has poor policies and is unresponsive to public concerns.
Public interest:
Public relations activity should be mutually beneficial to the organization and the public; it is the alignment of the organization’s self-interests with the public’s concerns and interests.
Two-way:
communication. Public relations is not just disseminating information but also the art of listening and engaging in a conversation with various publics.
Management function:
Public relations is most effective when it is a strategic and integral part of decision making by top management. Public relations involves counseling, problem solving, and the management of competition and conflict.

Public Relations as a Process
R
esearch. What is the problem or situation?
A
ction (program planning). What is going to be done about it?
C
ommunication (execution). How will the public be told?
E
valuation. Was the audience reached and what was the effect?

Public Relations as a Process
1. Research and Analysis:
This consists of inputs that determine the nature and extent of the public relations problem or opportunity. These may include feedback from the public, media reporting and editorial comment, analysis of trend data, other forms of research, personal experience, and government pressures and regulations.
2. Policy Formulation:
Public relations personnel, as advisors to top management, make recommendations on policy and what actions should be taken by the organization.
3. Programming:
Once a policy or action is agreed on, public relations staff begin to plan a communications program that will further the organization’s objectives. They will set objectives, define audiences, and decide on what strategies will be used on a specific timeline. Budget and staffing are also major considerations.
4. Communication:
Public relations personnel execute the program through such vehicles as news releases, media advisories, newsletters, Internet and Web postings, special events, speeches, and community relations programs.
5. Feedback:
The effect of these efforts is measured by feedback from the same components that made up the first step. Did the media mention the key messages? Did people change their attitudes or opinions? Did sales go up? Did the organization preserve or enhance its reputation?
6. Assessment:
The cycle is then repeated. The success or failure of the policy or program is assessed as a way of determining whether additional efforts are needed, or whether new issues or opportunities must be addressed. Thus, it is a continuing loop process.

A Public Relations Plan
It can help companies manage their critical public who challenge their behavior. It gives companies a voice and the ability to participate in the debate and either defend or promote itself to its various public.
The purpose of PR is to promote, and at the same time protect, a company's image or its individual products. It helps companies manage their relationships with all audiences. It can be seen to save money by managing threats to the business, and can generate revenue through the creation of support.

Preparing a PR Plan

How to Create a PR Plan
1. Executive Summary
2. Situation Analysis
3. Goal
4. Objectives
5. Target Audience
6. Key Messages
7. Strategies
8. Tactics
9. Budget
10. Measurement / Evaluation
Here you put a brief synopsis of what the plan is trying to address, and the time frame involved in carrying out the plan
Describes the situation in context of what the plan is trying to address. What is the current public opinion of the subject of the plan? How does it compare in the public’s eye to its closest competitors?
List who your primary audiences are that you want to impact through this plan.
What you want the PR campaign to achieve for your firm
Three or more objectives will probably underlie the goal. These should be specific, measurable and attainable and have a specific deadline for completion.
What methods will you use to get your message across? Strategies should include the broad who, how and what of accomplishing your objectives.
List no more than three key messages you want to impress upon your target audience. Too many messages create “noise” and confusion, reducing the possibility that your most important messages will get through.
The total budget will be a single line item; individual expenses will be noted in the Tactics section above.
Once your PR plan is completed, evaluate whether your objectives have been met. If not, determine why. Add these to the measurement section and make it part of your completed PR plan for historical reference.
Tactics are the specific action items you will take to support your strategies and meet your objectives. Each should include a deadline and cost estimate.

Workshop
In the same groups:


Create a PR Plan for the case of Toyota.
1. Executive Summary:
Here you put a brief synopsis of what the plan is trying to address, and the time frame involved in carrying out the plan
2. Situation Analysis:
describe the situation in context of what the plan is trying to address. What is the current public opinion of the subject of the plan? How does it compare in the public’s eye to its closest competitors?
3. Goal:
What you want the PR campaign to achieve for your firm
4. Objectives:
Three or more objectives will probably underlie the goal. These should be specific, measurable and attainable and have a specific deadline for completion.
5. Target Audience:
List who your primary audiences are that you want to impact through this plan.
How to Create a
Public Relations Plan
6. Key Messages:
List no more than three key messages you want to impress upon your target audience. Too many messages create “noise” and confusion, reducing the possibility that your most important messages will get through.
7. Strategies:
What methods will you use to get your message across? Strategies should include the broad who, how and what of accomplishing your objectives.
8. Tactics:
Tactics are the specific action items you will take to support your strategies and meet your objectives. Each should include a deadline and cost estimate.
9. Budget:
The total budget will be a single line item; individual expenses will be noted in the Tactics section above.
10. Measurement / Evaluation:
Once your PR plan is completed, evaluate whether your objectives have been met. If not, determine why. Add these to the measurement section and make it part of your completed PR plan for historical reference.


Jargon Busting
Publics:
a group of people with similar interests
Stakeholders:
a special public, composed of those who have a particular interest (or stake) in your organisation.
Audiences:
a “public” with whom you are communicating
Primary Publics:
the audiences you specifically want to influence (the people whose behaviour we are trying to change)
Secondary Publics:
the people who can intervene on your behalf and influence your primary publics (e.g. the media)

B2B:
Public relations marketing communication dedicated to providing information resources between businesses. Includes professional services, training, human resources and office supplies.
B2C:
As B2B, but between businesses and the consumer.
Community Relations:
Corporate social outreach programmes designed to build relations and foster understanding of the role of the business to neighbours in the local community
Consultancy:
Externally hired public relations services, either an individual consultant or a public relations consultancy


Copywriting:
The production of text for publications, advertising, marketing materials, websites etc. Most agencies employ specialists skilled with a direct and succinct writing style
Corporate Communications:
Public relations for a corporation integrated as part of the company's strategic objectives.
Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR):
Borne from the belief that trade brings obligations, CSR makes companies responsible for their use of resources, both environmentally and socially. The role of public relations in CSR strategies is to communicate effectively to build corporate accountability and transparency.

Crisis Management:
Having a plan in place that can be effectively actioned when something goes wrong for an organisation.
E-PR/Online PR:
Communicating over the web and using new technology to effectively communicate with stakeholders.
Environmental Communications:
PR sector specialising in communication on sustainable use of resources, environmental impact of business and corporate social responsibility.
Evaluation:
Measuring the impact of a public relations campaign. This process is typically linked with planning and research.
Jargon Busting
Jargon Busting
Jargon Busting

Fees:
The charges consultants and consultancies make for the time of their staff working on client programmes, usually invoiced in regular monthly installments or quarterly in advance.
Financial PR:
Financial services sector communications demanding understanding of consumers, their buying patterns and how to influence them, the position of companies in markets and corporate processes such as Initial Public Offerings (IPO's), Mergers and Acquisitions (M&A's), demutualisation and hostile bids.
Jargon Busting

Fundraising/Sponsorship:
Looking for partners to provide financial support or support 'in kind' for an event or activity where both parties will benefit.
Healthcare Communications:
PR sector specialising in public and private healthcare provision, including leisure health, effect of drugs and impacts of medical research.
In-House:
Staff within a company or organisation responsible for public relations function.
In-House Magazines/Newsletter:
A tool to communicate with employees about news, issues and developments of interest to them about the organisation they work for.
Jargon Busting

Internal Communications:
Organisational use of process communication to help achieve corporate objectives. Includes employee and shareholder communications.
Media/Presentation Training:
Training to help when dealing with the various media (including television and radio), with journalists and when making a pitch to prospective clients.
Media Monitoring:
Monitoring a company's coverage in the press, on TV and radio, and on the internet.
Media Relations:
Dealing with and building up good working relationships with journalists from the broadcast and print media.
Jargon Busting

Pitch:
A presentation of a recommended public relations programme, generally carefully researched and costed, which can take up to four weeks to prepare and for which some consultancies reserve the right to charge a fee if not subsequently appointed.
Press Office:
A press office handles all media enquiries and puts out all company messages to the media on behalf of their organisation.
Press Release (also known as a News Release):
Statement describing an event or item which is considered to be of sufficient interest to readers/viewers/listeners for an editor to publish reference to it.
Jargon Busting

Print Production:
The process of producing printed material such as brochures, posters and leaflets.
Public Affairs/Lobbying:
Those aspects of public relations communication involving relations with governmental or statutory bodies or their semi-official organisations through sophisticated use of political intelligence and pressure.
Public Relations:
The determined, planned and sustained effort to establish and maintain mutual understanding between an organisation and its publics. Also understood as reputation management.
Research:
Finding out background information about a company, product or person to assist with a public relations campaign.
Jargon Busting

Writing is a common activity of both public relations professionals and journalists. Both also do their jobs in the same way.
Scope
Objectives
Audiences
Channels
Public Relations vs. Journalism
Public relations, as stated earlier, has many components, ranging from counseling to issues management and special events. Journalistic writing and media relations, although important, are only two of these elements. In addition, effective practice of public relations requires strategic thinking, problem-solving capability, and other management skills.
Journalists gather and select information for the primary purpose of providing the public with news and information. Public relations personnel also gather facts and information for the purpose of informing the public, but the objective is not only to inform but also to change people’s attitudes and behaviors in order to further an organization’s goals and objectives. Harold Burson, chairman of Burson-Marsteller, makes the point: “To be effective and credible, public relations messages must be based on facts. Nevertheless, we are advocates, and we need to remember that. We are advocates of a particular point of view—our client’s or our employer’s point of view. And while we recognize that serving the public interest best serves our client’s interest, we are not journalists. That’s not our job.”
Journalists write primarily for a mass audience—readers, listeners, or viewers of the medium for which they work. By definition, mass audiences are not well defined, and a journalist on a daily newspaper, for example, writes for the general public. A public relations professional, in contrast, carefully segments audiences into various demographic and psychological characteristics. Such research allows messages to be tailored to audience needs, concerns, and interests for maximum effect.
Most journalists, by nature of their employment, reach audiences through one channel—the medium that publishes or broadcasts their work. On the other hand, public relations professionals use a variety of channels to reach the audiences previously described. The channels employed may be a combination of mass media outlets— newspapers, magazines, radio, and television. Or they may include direct mail, brochures, posters, newsletters, trade journals, special events, podcasts, blogs, websites, and even video postings on YouTube.

Writing is a common activity of both public relations professionals and journalists. Both also do their jobs in the same way.
Scope
Objectives
Audiences
Channels
Public Relations vs. Advertising
Public relations, as stated earlier, has many components, ranging from counseling to issues management and special events. Journalistic writing and media relations, although important, are only two of these elements. In addition, effective practice of public relations requires strategic thinking, problem-solving capability, and other management skills.
Journalists gather and select information for the primary purpose of providing the public with news and information. Public relations personnel also gather facts and information for the purpose of informing the public, but the objective is not only to inform but also to change people’s attitudes and behaviors in order to further an organization’s goals and objectives. Harold Burson, chairman of Burson-Marsteller, makes the point: “To be effective and credible, public relations messages must be based on facts. Nevertheless, we are advocates, and we need to remember that. We are advocates of a particular point of view—our client’s or our employer’s point of view. And while we recognize that serving the public interest best serves our client’s interest, we are not journalists. That’s not our job.”
Journalists write primarily for a mass audience—readers, listeners, or viewers of the medium for which they work. By definition, mass audiences are not well defined, and a journalist on a daily newspaper, for example, writes for the general public. A public relations professional, in contrast, carefully segments audiences into various demographic and psychological characteristics. Such research allows messages to be tailored to audience needs, concerns, and interests for maximum effect.
Most journalists, by nature of their employment, reach audiences through one channel—the medium that publishes or broadcasts their work. On the other hand, public relations professionals use a variety of channels to reach the audiences previously described. The channels employed may be a combination of mass media outlets— newspapers, magazines, radio, and television. Or they may include direct mail, brochures, posters, newsletters, trade journals, special events, podcasts, blogs, websites, and even video postings on YouTube.
Full transcript