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WRT 150 1

Roadmap
by

Amy Norkus

on 23 August 2014

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Transcript of WRT 150 1

WRT 150 Roadtrip
INVENTION
Filling the tank
(or charging the battery).
We aren't always given a topic, so we need to keep our eyes open to stories, articles, and visuals.
The brain's center of reasoning and problem solving is among the last to mature, a new study graphically reveals. The decade-long magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of normal brain development, from ages 4 to 21, by researchers at NIH's National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) shows that such "higher-order" brain centers, such as the prefrontal cortex, don't fully develop until young adulthood ("Brain's Center").
Groups:
Use your sample starting paragraph to brainstorm related ideas from your own lives/knowledge bases. List at least one per group member...keep going until time runs out.
http://www.bubbl.us
purpose and motive
Finding direction and a reason for writing.
A solid, specific purpose means manageability. When you take on too much, your job is harder and your ideas remain undeveloped.









To achieve a specific purpose, we can look at our broad topic through many different avenues.
It's kind of like driving too fast--you whiz by everything, and it's all a blur.
Topic Highway
Proclamation Street
A new rule, law, or decision can help narrow your purpose. What was the decision that sparked Standen's nail biting piece?
Division Ave.
Break your topic into parts, moving from general to specific.
Demographic Blvd.
Narrow your topic based on the people it affects. Focus on age, ethnicity, disabilities, mobility, employment status, location, or whatever other designation matters to you.
Conversation Lane
Listen to the various voices. These can come from specific experts or sources, standard views, implied views, sides of a debate, or your own views.
Motive: the intellectual context that you establish for your topic and thesis at the start of your essay, in order to suggest why someone, besides your instructor, might want to read an essay on this topic or need to hear your particular thesis argued—why your thesis isn’t just obvious to all, why other people might hold other theses (that you think are wrong). Your motive should be aimed at your audience: it won’t necessarily be the reason you first got interested in the topic (which could be private and idiosyncratic) or the personal motivation behind your engagement with the topic. Indeed it’s where you suggest that your argument isn’t idiosyncratic, but rather is generally interesting. The motive you set up should be genuine: a misapprehension or puzzle that an intelligent reader (not a straw dummy) would really have, a point that such a reader would really overlook.
--from "Elements of an Academic Essay" by Gordon Harvey, Harvard College Writing Program
A few more thoughts on motive
pattern and order
Mapping your route.
Use your sources. We are not allowing our sources to organize the paper--we are just pulling out source information that we know we want to develop into paragraphs.
We need to analyze the rhetorical purpose of the paper we're writing, and start with clusters. In this case, it's problem/solution, so we need to cluster in terms of What, Why, and How:
Intro (1 paragraph): Show your connection (personal story). Show your motive. Give your thesis statement/statement of purpose.
"What?" Cluster (1-3 paragraphs): Show that the problem exists. Use personal stories or examples from sources as evidence.
"Why?" Cluster (2-4 paragraphs): Give the dangers --the negative effects and specific reasons this problem needs to be fixed.
"How?" Cluster (1-3 paragraphs): Give solutions. Show your readers what needs to change.
Conclusion (1 paragraph): Restate the biggest danger. Explain who is most affected by this problem. Give a visual image of change.
Topic: Anxiety-based nail biting in adult women.
For Tuesday:

1. Complete your pattern (homework)

2. Work on your problem/solution draft. Workshop is in one week--a full draft is expected.

3. Review the MLA Ex. 2 handout. Use it to help cite your sources in your draft.
synthesis
Who's in the car?

2. Interact with your sources. These are not just soundbites...these are IDEAS.

They Say, I Say Ch. 4 shows you different ways on interacting, while Ch. 6 asks you to plant an opposing view--a voice against which you are arguing in the paper.
To synthesize sources into our writing, we need to do three things:
1. Vary the types of evidence you are including:

a) Expert opinion
b) Statistics
c) Examples/stories

This will help create balance for the reader.

Let's look at Andrus's essay...
3. Cite sources properly. MLA citation connects
in-text citation (MLA Ex. 2) with the Works Cited page...MLA Ex. 3.
You have to know how a Works Cited entry will begin for a source if you’re going to know what should go in the parenthetical reference.

The hierarchy for Works Cited entries is as follows:
1. Author or authors. If you have authors, begin the Works Cited entry with them.

2. Organization or group. Look for a group of people responsible for the information, and begin the entry with the name of the organization.

3. Article title. If no people are claiming responsibility, use the article in quotation marks.

4. Website title. Use this only if you are citing an entire website.
Start by writing each group members name at the top of each of your colored sheets. For each source, your group has 3 minutes to complete the following:

Match the sheet color to the article color.
Determine the source type by checking the appropriate box.
Determine the way the works cited entry for that source will begin.
Create a correct parenthetical reference for the source, and write it on the sheet in the space provided.

Your group will get 1 E.C. point for each correct answer. The group with the most points gets an extra 3.
SOURCE SCRAMBLE!
String a
thread
.
For Tuesday:

Use today's workshop sheet and notes to revise your draft. It's due to me for feedback at the end of lab.
Write as if.

When writing a narrative, the story has to matter to more than just you.

As you generate ideas, you have to think of reasons that anyone else would want to read your story, and as you reflect within your writing, you need to ask yourself, "Are my reflections interesting and relatable?"
In college, you are often writing in a strange little bubble to a literal audience of one: your professor.






Our job, then, is to make them hang on.
The arc of the narrative essay:
For Tuesday:

Continue freewriting on this prompt or your remaining two prompts. Bring at least two pages of writing to lab
(10 pts.).

Review the MLA Ex. 4 handout.
But good writing happens when we assume that we are writing for a larger group...a crowd of people who are hanging on our every word.
http://storycorps.org/listen/tyrese-graham/
Setting the scene--who you are, where you are, why you are there.
Transitioning through the action while including descriptive details.
Winding down the action and description and reflecting on the story.
transitions
Building bridges.
Metaphorically, the main roads are the subtopics we are exploring in a paper--the paragraphs or, in the case of the narrative, scenes.

And just like any trip we take, we can't drive through water.










In writing, we need to create those bridges.
In a non-narrative essay, some times we create short transition paragraphs between paragraphs...
or we link two paragraphs together.
Interesting main point!
Interesting main point!
!
In narration, we usually rely on chronological transitions.


Chronological transitions indicate the movement of time...forward or backward.
There are ways for homeless people to get free food besides panhandling. Websites such as Homeless Shelter Directory.org make it easier for the homeless to take advantage of giveaways by simply printing out the coupon.
___________________________________________________________. Homeless shelters have Internet access, and there are many libraries with Internet and printer access as well.
Connections between paragraphs unify your paper.
They can be the last sentence of one paragraph, or the first sentence of the next.
1. Try an echoed phrase (not repeated verbatim).
Health scare artists have found a whole new medium for terrorizing the public - the Internet. Consequently, individuals in search of accurate health information may literally become caught in the Web, where health hoaxes and urban medical myths run rampant. These medical e-warnings are always the same - whatever it is, it will make you sick. Internet health scares have unique and complicating characteristics that make them difficult to counter. Such health scares are spread wildly by email, and an email forwarded from a concerned friend certainly adds credibility to a hoax--but concerned friends shouldn’t be held accountable.
Once the health scare is out, many people forget about one of the main problems: responsibility for the scare. Where the scare actually began can be a difficult thing to discover, and the Internet makes it even harder to trace…
A few new ways to think about transitions between paragraphs:
1. Try an echoed phrase (not repeated verbatim).
Health scare artists have found a whole new medium for terrorizing the public - the Internet. Consequently, individuals in search of accurate health information may literally become caught in the Web, where health hoaxes and urban medical myths run rampant. These medical e-warnings are always the same - whatever it is, it will make you sick. Internet health scares have unique and complicating characteristics that make them difficult to counter. Such health scares are spread wildly by email, and an email forwarded from a concerned friend certainly adds credibility to a hoax--but concerned friends shouldn’t be held accountable.
Once the health scare is out, many people forget about one of the main problems: responsibility for the scare. Where the scare actually began can be a difficult thing to discover, and the Internet makes it even harder to trace…
A few new ways to think about transitions between paragraphs:
2. Try a question.
Health scare artists have found a whole new medium for terrorizing the public - the Internet. Consequently, individuals in search of accurate health information may literally become caught in the Web, where health hoaxes and urban medical myths run rampant. These medical e-warnings are always the same - whatever it is, it will make you sick. Internet health scares have unique and complicating characteristics that make them difficult to counter. Such health scares are spread wildly by email, and an email forwarded from a concerned friend certainly adds credibility to a hoax--but concerned friends shouldn’t be held accountable.
Who should be held responsible for the scare? Where the scare actually began can be a difficult thing to discover, and the Internet makes it even harder to trace…
Either way, a transition doesn’t just switch topics—it shows the relationship between them.
So how do we BEGIN the narrative?

1.
At the beginning.
Start with the moment you made the decision that sparked the narrative, or the moment the real action in the narrative begins.
2.
In medias res.
In Latin, this means "In the

middle of things." You can start with a moment of action, then use transitions to move backward in time.
3.
With reflection.
You can write a short paragraph that explains your thoughts in relation to the story. "I never thought..." or "The _____est moment in my life..." are good starting points.
4.
With an object description.
This allows you to choose an object that matters to your story, and describe it sitting somewhere. You seeing the object leads to a flashback to the narrative.
For Tuesday:

1. Use today's group work to write more of your scenes.
The exploratory draft is due on Tuesday at the end of lab.
2. Use the transitions handout to start linking your scenes together.
3. Review the MLA Ex. 5 handout.
audience
style
or
Style is achieved on a sentence level. There are three main techniques you can use to improve your writing style:

1. Vary your sentence lengths;
2. Get rid of deadwood;
3. Add your voice.
1. Vary sentence lengths.

Longer sentences have more flow.
Shorter sentences have emphasis.
Sentence-combining can create this.
This writing has a stop-and-go effect.
2. Get rid of deadwood.

Deadwood mainly consists of or can be defined as a plethora of useless words that are mainly utilized in such a manner as to fill up space within a paper or an essay written by a student at the college-level. This is mainly due to the fact that many professors are known to occasionally or even quite often assign student papers with a specific length requirement that students in all of their busy daily lives and other engagements have trouble fulfilling.
3. Add your voice.

Voice lets readers know there's a person behind the page. It's about word choice (diction), and it makes writing interesting to read. Consider the differences between these sentences:

If one were to follow me, they'd find that I often go to wastewater treatment plants and landfills.
vs.
If one were to seriously stalk me, they'd find that I spend a ludicrous amount of time at, of all places, wastewater treatment plants and landfills.
For Tuesday the 26th:

1. Revise your narrative based on today's workshop. It's due at the end of lab. (Plan ahead--the WC will be calling out groups, so you may lose 15-minutes of writing/revision time.
2. Review the MLA Ex. 6 handout.
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