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The History of The Internet Part Two

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Jason Thatcher

on 22 September 2015

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Transcript of The History of The Internet Part Two

The History of the Internet Part Two:
Tim Berners-Lee, WWW, and the Raging Nineties

A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away... Global tensions are fading ... As boundaries fall, enabling technologies break down barriers to information sharing, and the scent of change is in the air ...
1974
Cerf and Kahn coin the term Internet
Altair 8800 featured on Popular Electronics
Computing
1976
Ethernet
TCP/IP Required for use on ARPANet
1979
USENET created by Steve Bellovin, Tom Truscott, & Jim Ellis at UNC
BITNET - "Because its Time Network" introduce by IBM
First store and forward network, used for E-mail
1981
NSF introduces CSNET, a 56 Kbps network, for institutions without access to ARPANET
Cern suggests connecting CSNET to ARPANET
1983
Every machine connected to ARPANET had to use TCP/IP
University of Wisconsin creates the Domain Name System
Why is the DNS important?
Packets could be attached to a domain name, which were then translated by a server to IP addresses.
130.127.69.75
www.clemson.edu
1985
NSF begins deploying T1 lines
1988
T1 national backbone complete. Traffic increases so quickly that NSF begins upgrading the network again.
Computing
Social change for the masses
Online communities around picture sharing, music, and non-research topics start forming.
What does this mean?
The Internet is accessible to the masses - individuals & industry
Computing
Computing
Computing
Computing
Rickrolling is born!
1989
Tim Berners-Lee writes a proposal for a hypterext based database.
1990
Tim Berners-Lee and Robert Cailliau rewrite the proposal and pitch it to vendors.

No one takes them up on it.
Christmas
1990
Berners-Lee built all the tools for the web.

HTTP, HTML, Web Broswer, Server Software
The NextCube becomes
the first web server
August 6, 1991
The WorldWideWeb (WWW) project aims to allow all links to be made to any information anywhere. [...] The WWW project was started to allow high energy physicists to share data, news, and documentation. We are very interested in spreading the web to other areas, and having gateway servers for other data. Collaborators welcome!"

- Tim Berners Lee
1993
THE WEB HAS ARRIVED!
THE RAGING NINETIES
NASDAQ 1994 to 2008
DOT.COM's
BOMB!
A company that does most of its business through the Internet
Phrase was coined during the 1990s to describe companies designed to take advantage of venture capital
The goal of many such firms was to grab market share, earn consumer loyalty, and sell out to a bigger firm or through an IPO.
Direct sales to consumers - esp. mac products
Marketed products in 11 languages
$2.7 million in 1997
$22 in private equity in 1998
$70 million in IPO in 1998
Founded in 1994
Next Day Shipping
RIP 2001 - Remnants acquired by Fry's
a venture-capital-driven online company that promised free one-hour delivery of "videos, games, dvds, music, mags, books, food, basics & more"and Starbucks coffee in several major cities in the United States.
Promised free one hour delivery
1998-2001
April 2001, employees showed up to locked doors
1998-2003
Sold Latin music online including
Marc Anthony, Tito Puente, and Celia Cruz
IPO did not launch after
markets crashed in 2002
Napster emerges
1990-2001
1998-2000
1997-2001
1998-2000
1998-2001
1999-2000
1999-2000
http://www.cnet.com/1990-11136_1-6278387-1.html
1998-2001
Flooz.com
Pop Goes the World!
2000 - 2001
YOU NEED A BUSINESS MODEL - THAT DEFINES HOW YOU GENERATE VALUE!
The Internet and the WWW are no longer the province of GEEKS ... and the backroom ... They are seen as central to firm success ... and folks think that they can leverage these new technologies to make real money!
In our next installment, inside Web 1.0 with the boys from Startup.com
1995
Search engine
Web portal
Mail
News
Maps
1994
Cadabra = cadaver
Bookstore
Slow growth
- Ken Yarmosh
Online auctions
Gasoline
Travel
1998
1998
Search
Adwords
If you couldn't sell, you hoped to eventually charge for services to extract profits.
Intense competition for market share within narrowly defined marketspace
Brand awareness
17 .com paid 2 million each for 30 second spots.
To power the "new" economy, broadband access was heavily invested in by Nortel, Global Crossing, and other companies
Pets.com - $82.5 million
E-currency

$35 million
Grocery delivery service

$375 million
$166 million in may 1999 IPO
$160 million for online fashion
$790 million Disney write-off
Teen girls
online!
Full transcript