Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

ASL Transitions

No description
by

Lisa Koch

on 17 March 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of ASL Transitions

ASL Transitions
Definition
To transition between events, the most common strategies used are: pauses, time signs, and topicalization.
Stories are usually signed in chronological order and are linked together with common transitions.
Transitions take place of punctuation and pauses
that we use in written English.
Reason behind using transitions
In ASL, we use pauses, facial expressions or
time markers to distinguish between chunks
of ideas/information.
Vocab
Growing up
Elementary School
Middle School
HS
College
Morning
Noon
Night
Spring
Winter
Summer
Fall
Comparison between transitions in English and ASL
English:
Examples:
Elementary School, HS, College, Morning, Night
Flat palm facing down, move upwards from feet to head
dominant handshape is an E while the non dominant hand is hovering above it while the dominant E is moving in a circle
H-S
Non-dominant hand lined parallel to
floor. Dominant hand makes a large c-shape
non-dominant hand parallel to the floor and the dominant hand is in a l-shape hand facing you
Same as morning with hand not facing you
On Sunday I go to church.
On Monday I go to School.
place dominant hand over non-dominant hand and swipe your hand over non-dominant
cup your non-dominant hand, bring your dominant hand and move it past non-dominant, making a dominant hand look like a flower blooming
make a fist with both hands and move back and forth
X handshape is drawn across the forehead
raise your dominant hand and place your non-dominant by your elbow and release down
middle finger of your dominant hand to the open palm of your non-dominant hand. clap twice (sign school)
ASL
SUNDAY I GO CHURCH
(brow raise)MONDAY I GO SCHOOL
Time signs are used to show how much time has passed between events (i.e. five months later, two hours later).
Topicalization is used to introduce a new topic (i.e. in 2004, I graduated college) with the topic/comment facial expressions.
Topicalization has an essential role of organizing discourse into smaller units. It provides a way to categorize or show segmentation of idea units.
For example, in spoken languages, prosodic markers include intonation, rhythm, tempo, stress, lengthening, volume and pausing.
In signed languages, prosodic structures are expressed by changes in the following:
eye aperture
head movement
body leans
lengthening of signs
cheek puffing
nose wrinkling
hand clasping
among other physical behaviors
ASL PROSODIC MARKERS
HANDS

Held handshape
Hands drop
Signing space
ASL Prosodic Markers
BODY

Body lean
Body movement
Visible breath
Shoulders raise
HEAD & NECK

Head tilt
Head turn
Head nod
Head shake
Side to side
Neck tensing
EYES, NOSE & MOUTH
Eyebrows
Eye gaze shift
Eye aperture
Nose wrinkling
Mouth gestures
Puffed cheeks
Full transcript