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Baltimore MICA

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Peter Rogovin

on 19 October 2014

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Transcript of Baltimore MICA

“Meaningful engagement is important, meaning the kids are really learning something…You have to hire staff who are experts in what you want the kids to learn about to ensure it’s a skill building-opportunity for the young people.”
- Rebecca London, senior researcher at John W. Gardner
Center for Youth and Their Communities at Stanford
University
Adelma Hnasko
• Tween Insights
• 10 Success Principles
Agenda

• The Something to Say Report: Research Approach
PRINCIPLE NO. 1:
Instructors are professional, practicing artists, and are valued with compensation for their expertise and investment in their professional development.
PRINCIPLE NO. 2:
Executive Directors have
a public commitment to
high-quality arts programs
that is supported by sustained
action.
PRINCIPLE NO. 3:
Arts programs take place in
dedicated, inspiring, welcoming
spaces and affirm the value of art
and artists.
PRINCIPLE NO. 4:
There is a culture of high
expectations, respect for
creative expression and an
affirmation of youth participants
as artists.
PRINCIPLE NO. 5:
Programs culminate in
high-quality public events
with real audiences.
PRINCIPLE NO. 7:
Youth participants actively shape
programs and assume meaningful
leadership roles.
PRINCIPLE NO. 8:
Programs focus on hands-on
skill building using current
equipment and technology.
PRINCIPLE NO. 9:
Programs strategically engage
key stakeholders to create a
network of support for both youth
participants and the programs.
PRINCIPLE NO. 10:
Programs provide a physically
and emotionally safe place for
youth.
The 10 Principles:
Principle #1: Instructors are professional, practicing artists, and are valued with compensation for their expertise and investment in their professional development.

Principle #2: Executive directors have a public commitment to high-quality arts programs that is supported by sustained action.

Principle #3: Arts programs take place in dedicated, inspiring, welcoming spaces and affirm the value of art and artists.

Principle #4: There is a culture of high expectations, respect for creative expression and an affirmation of youth participants as artists.

Principle #5: Programs culminate in high-quality public events with real audiences.

Principle #6: Positive relationships with adult mentors and peers foster a sense of belonging and acceptance.

Principle #7: Youth participants actively shape programs and assume meaningful leadership roles.

Principle #8: Programs focus on hands-on skill building using current equipment and technology.

Principle #9: Programs strategically engage key stakeholders to create a network of support for both youth participants and the programs.

Principle #10: Programs provide a physically and emotionally safe place for youth.

Lissa Soep
Gil Noam
Jason Yoon
Ken Cole
Shirley Brice Heath
Gigi Antoni
Traci Slater-Rigaud
Rafael Flores
What Does This Consumer Want?
Culminating events
Rituals and food (lots of it)
“In that presenting moment, when you take it live, or share
it with an audience - who may not know you and may not love
you - that is a critical moment, and the young people I work with love that moment.”
- Adelma Hnasko, researcher and former director
of New Mexico School of the Arts
Flex-ulum - (noun): term invented by artist mentors at Spy Hop to describe their philosophy of being flexible in programming as part of their commitment to embracing youth involvement.
Professional / expert instructors
PRINCIPLE NO. 6:
Positive relationships with adult
mentors and peers foster a sense
of belonging and acceptance.
“...there is a dignity when an adult whom you admire, whom you look up to, who is an artist you probably want to be like, asks you what you are interested in, what you are trying to make, what are the questions you are asking in your life.”
- Jason Yoon, former Executive Director, New Urban Arts,
Providence, Rhode Island
A. Addressing youth as artists, dancers, writers, poets
Permission Barriers:
What Do I Think of Arts?
Is It Something I Would Do?
Emphasize fun, novelty, even humor
Create trial periods to reduce risk
Provide access to new technology
Reduce barriers by:
Descriptive Norms:
What Do YOU Think of Arts?
Using respected spokespeople
Create highly engaging experiences
Publicize high arts participation 
Normalize by:
Terminology is important
Don't call it arts. But, do use descriptive and engaging names
Use a consumer lens to ensure programs meet youth needs 
Selected Insights from the Research

1. A demand-oriented mindset
3. Designing the perfect OST arts program
Language used to define relationships
Facilitate trusting relationships
Rituals to foster belonging
“…one of the big differences between me just sitting at home writing, and me coming into Youth Speaks workshops is the atmosphere that’s created. It’s really a safe space; you can say whatever you want, whatever you feel.
- Stephanie Yun, Youth Speaks Poet
“…the chance we have is to understand young people differently, to build their assets and strengths…to allow them to experiment without being judged.”
- Dr. Gil Noam, Psychologist and Expert on Out-of-School Time, Harvard University
Permission barriers: "Would I do that?"
Descriptive norms: Helping tweens define "normal"
• Discussion
2. A new decision making process
"My parents encourage me to do what I want."
6th Grade Girl, Cleveland, OH
“I have 75% of the [decision power] and I make more of the decisions. I say there’s things I want to do. My mom would have to make sure it is ok.”
5th Grade Boy, Newark, NJ
“I would find a whole bunch of information about it. Then I would ask my mom. And if she said no, I would keep on looking. And then if she still say no, I would beg her.”
5th Grade Girl, Cleveland, OH
New friends with shared interests
“Someone who knows what they are talking about. Better if they earn a living from that so you’d feel secure in what they know.”
Hands-on learning in inspired spaces
7th Grade Girl, Oakland CA
“They have to be famous – if not, then top-notch; the best in New Jersey.”
5th Grade Boy, Newark, NJ
B. Mandatory attendance / hours
C. Creating original works of art
D. Formalized peer and expert critique
“…the most effective organizations think beyond who their normal stakeholders might be to who is it in this community who has a stake in the livelihood of young people... the parks and recreation folks, people from the local medical care facility, pediatric and youth unit, judges, probation officers”
- Shirley Brice Heath, PhD., Linguistic Anthropologist and Researcher, Stanford University
Equip the tween to successfully negotiate participation with the parent
How can urban, low-income tweens and teens gain equal access to high-quality arts experiences?

www.wallacefoundation.org/somethingtosay
Is there a model of practices that could provide a blueprint for community-based organizations to emulate, so that proven approaches could be deployed in more places, more often?
Is there a way to approach the analysis of these problems that respects and honors young people as consumers who make informed choices, and how does what youth want align with what other experts say they need?
• Local scouts
• Screening criteria: engaged in arts, speak clearly, no rejectors
Research Approach

• Heavy Users: Most of the consumption, deeper insights
• Scope: 64 teens, 150+ tweens, 70+ parents and caregivers
• Format: focus groups & in-home interviews in 5 metro areas;
all youth participants kept free time photo journals
1. Demand-oriented mindset
What do you think of when we say "the arts" or "arts programs?"
Painting
Drawing
Sculpture
and also:
"Arts & Crafts"
2. A new decision making process
2. A new decision making process
2. A new decision making process
2. A new decision making process
2. A new decision making process
“I might not go if other people keep telling me its wack”
5th Grade Boy, Oakland, CA
3. Social networking
3. Social networking
3. Social networking
Competition: other programs, collective opinion
Few obligations to finish; low or no penalties for disengagement
Dials up importance of early engagement
4. Social and personal barriers
4. Social and personal barriers
4. Social and personal barriers
Quick recap:
Tweens want to be teens
It is all about the group
Executive Director Tactics That Help Support Arts
Give arts program directors a seat at the table
Allocate dedicated physical space to arts
Ensure arts are a visible part of organization's identity, such as annual reports, websites, what is celebrated in hallways
Key Factors Regarding Dedicated Spaces
Young people should feel it is theirs; third place
Positive and affirming
Functional and dedicated to one or more art forms
Tween programs: Youth informed
Teen programs: Youth led
Knowledge in Brief
Case study videos
Opinion leader interview summary videos
Thank you!
Full report
"Ego"
"We-go"
Parents of boys share (indulge?) their children's sports lottery fantasies
Put onus on program to engage their children; will not fight disengagement
Higher order goals, but not a ticket out of poverty... like sports
"...there is a dignity when an adult whom you admire, whom you look up to, who is an artist you probably want to be like, asks you what you are interested in, what you are trying to make, what are the questions you are asking in your life."

- Jason Yoon, former Executive Director, New Urban Arts, Providence, RI
1. Demand-oriented mindset
Full report, plus knowledge brief and videos,
www.wallacefoundation.org
Start with heavy users: engaged teens
Research Approach
Use local scouts
Screening criteria: engaged in arts, speak clearly, no rejectors
Scope: 64 teens, 150+ tweens, 70+ parents and caregivers
Format: focus groups & in-home interviews in 5 metro areas; all youth participants kept free time photo journals
available at:
Tweens are starting to drive OST decision making in the home
Tweens know what they want - but that doesn't mean they are going to go!
Adelma Hnasko
Lissa Soep
Gil Noam
Jason Yoon
Ken Cole
Shirley Brice Heath
Gigi Antoni
Traci Slater-Rigaud
Rafael Flores
Camden-Cam!
Full transcript