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Using Simle, concrete, and familiar words

My research and report in Business and technical writing
by

Hark Herald Sarmiento

on 3 March 2013

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Transcript of Using Simle, concrete, and familiar words

using simple,
familiar and
concrete words As writers, we should choose the most suitable word for our readers. Some suggestions can be given on how to do this, but the suggestions are not rules. In the end, the writer is the judge. On this lesson, it is suggested to choose short, familiar words.
According to Ernest Gowers, quoting Fowler, we should prefer the: Familiar word
Concrete word
Simple word
Single word
Short word These are in order of importance, so being familiar is most important, and being Saxon, the least important. For instance, in place of "caliginous", we might prefer "foggy", because it meets the first four conditions, and it is, at least, not Latin. On this page, I consider only familiar and short words. Use Familiar Words You communicate more effectively when you use words that are familiar to your readers. Familiar words are often short words, but not always: for instance,
is a long word, but it is also a familiar one. impossible Using familiar words does not mean you should use only words found in the local newspaper, but says you should use only words found in the material your readers commonly read. In some cases, this means you use words which are unknown to the general reader, but familiar to your particular readers. For instance, you might use when writing for bee-keepers, but prefer when writing for general readers. apiary bee-hive THEREFORE, WE SHOULD CONSIDER
OUR READERS WHEN WRITING! Even though further statements might correct this misunderstanding, the harm has been done, and - at the least - the reader is confused, and - in the worst case - the reader develops strong negative feelings. These negative feelings might be hard to dispel, clouding further understanding. While making no error in grammar or diction the writer has failed to get through to the readers and has led them to feel the opposite of what he intended. The morale is this: if readers do not know the meaning of a word, they will guess it, perhaps wrongly, and if you need to avoid the dangers of misunderstanding, you will choose your words carefully. writing speaking Vs We train our students to analyze technical reports with some sophistication. If we go for a simpler word than sophisticated, we might prefer to write either:
We train our students to correctly analyse technical reports.
Here we replace sophisticated with correctly.
We train our students to analyse complex technical reports.
Here we prefer complex to sophisticated. Or If we go for a simpler word than sophisticated, we might prefer to write either:
We train our students to correctly
analyse technical reports.
Here we replace sophisticated with
correctly. Or
We train our students to
analyse complex technical reports.
Here we prefer complex to sophisticated. Trite Fresh/Common
Makes provision for ... Does ...
The fullest possible extent ... The most ...
For the reason that ... Since ...
Inasmuch as ... Since ...
In the event that ... If ...
On the basis of ... By ..
. Avoid overworked words and phrases. Some words and phrases have become trite and tiresome. Ordinary and simple words attract by their simplicity and naturalness. Look for fresh but common words that clearly communicate. Notice the difference between the above expressions... One cause of monotony in speech is the frequent repetition of the same word. For many of our indefinite words that we use over and over, we should know at least a half dozen vivid, picture-making words that mean all that the general one does and something more. For example, instead of saying that some person went by, wouldn't it often be clearer as wall as less monotonous to use one of the following verbs?
ran hastened strolled rushed skipped fled tripped marched scampered shuffled slouched loitered. LET's HAVE FUN!!!
1. Make a list of more definite verbs to use in place of wet in this sentence: The shower wet the ground.

2. Make lists of specific verbs suggested by these verbs: cooked, made.

3. Have you ever noticed how often you repeat the verb said in telling a story? Make a list of verbs that may often be used instead of said. Thank you for listening! :)
HAPPY WRITING! <3 <3 <3
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