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Huck Finn's Map

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Joy Kumagai

on 12 March 2013

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Transcript of Huck Finn's Map

Created by Joy Kumagai
and Alex James Huck Finn's Map St. Petersburg St. Louis Cairo Mississippi River Ohio River Missouri River Being Civilized
Ch. 1-4 "Then she told me all about the bad place, and I said I wished I was there. She got mad, then, but I didn't mean no harm. All I wanted was to go somewheres; all I wanted was a change..." Pg.5 Summary Characters Setting How Huck Changes
and What He Learns Key Questions: The story starts out with Huck living with the Widow Douglas and Miss Watson, who are attempting to civilize him through education, manners, culture, etc. Huck and Tom play a prank on Jim who is Miss Watson’s Slave. Huck realizes that his father is back so he goes to the judge to sell him his money so he won’t have to lie to Pap about the money. Pap was waiting for Huck in his room. Huck Finn
Jim
Widow Douglas
Miss Watson
Judge Thatcher
Tom Sawyer Jo Harper
Ben Rogers
Tommy Barhes
The "New" Judge
Pap Hannibal, Missouri is located in central Missouri and is a small town at the northern edge of the Lower Mississippi River. Huck mainly spends his time at Widow Douglas' house. Conflict Man Vs. Society Pap is constantly disobeying the government and society's laws and Huck is conflicted in the importance of being civilized 1) Should people follow society’s
rules instead of their own
conscience?

2) Where is the line drawn
between children having fun
and their games hurting
other people? Breaking Free
Ch. 5-7 "But by-and-by pap got too handy with his hick'ry, and I couldn't stand it. I was all over welts. He got to going away so much, too, and locking me in." Pg.26 Summary Characters Setting Conflict How Huck Changes
and What He Learns Key Questions: Huck is introduced as an uneducated, gullible, renegade of a child that is pulling away from society as he learns more about the southern culture.
When he is part of the gang, he comes to the conclusion that they are acting extremely childish and that it is morally wrong to be attacking Sunday School groups, even if it’s for fun.
Mark Twain also reveals the relationship between Huck and his abusive father.
Readers can see the fear and the
change Pap installs in Huck’s life. His father takes Huck to the cabin that he built, where no one can find it, and kidnaps Huck. Huck's father is a drunk, so he is always trying to use and he hurts Huck. Huck is never allowed to leave the cabin because his father locks it up and won’t let him leave. So, one day Huck gets a clever idea and cuts a hole in the wall and covers it up with a blanket. He then sneaks out and kills a wild pig to make it look like someone robbed the house and killed Huck. He then floats up the river to Jackson Island where he hides out. Huck Finn
Pap
Judge Thatcher
Widow Douglas
The "New" Judge
The "New" Judge's wife Huck Vs. Pap Their relationship is viewed differently from each character. Pap wants to use and control Huck yet Huck wants to be independent and have a positive relationship with his father. External Disguised From Society
Ch. 8-11 "'Jim, this is nice,' I says. 'I wouldn't want to be nowhere else but here. Pass me along another hunk of fish and some hot corn-bread.'" Pg. 51 Summary Characters Setting Conflict What Huck Learns
and How He Changes Key Questions: Huck stumbles upon Jim, who ran away because Miss Watson’s was going to sell him. Jim makes Huck swear not to tell that he is a run-away slave. They camp out together, but Jim gets a snakebite as a result of a trick Huck plays on him. After a big rainstorm they salvage items from a floating house that had a dead man in it that Jim recognizes as Pap but he does not tell Huck. Huck dresses like a girl and goes into Judith Loftus’s house and she tells him about a reward for Jim and Huck’s murder case. When Huck gets back to Jackson’s Island he and Jim adventure onto the river and begin their journey. Huck Finn
Jim
The Captain of the boat
Pap
Judge Thatcher Bessie Polly
Sid and Martha
Miss Judith Loftus
Miss Judith Loftus' husband
Others on the island Conscience vs. Laws Huck has an internal battle between turning Jim in as a runaway slave or befriending him and joining forces. His loneliness wants Jim as a friend, but he also feels bad that this affects Miss Watson. Throughout the episodes Huck is reminded that what they are doing is illegal. Internal Old Life Vs. New Life Huck is faced with the decision to leave the society he knows for a new life, or being with his father and the people he cares about. Internal Originally Huck is caring only about himself and realizes that being on his own is hard because of the feeling of loneliness.
He changes throughout this episode when he makes the decision to listen to his heart, instead of society, concerning Jim.
Also, the incident concerning the rattlesnake and Jim shows Huck that his actions do affect others and he feels bad about what he did. 1) Should a person follow what
they feel or how society will
feel about their actions?

2) How much can you stretch
the truth to cover a secret? In the beginning of this episode, Huck is trying to embrace Pap the best way he can and trying just to endure his father’s manipulation. Huck enjoys not having to live up to the standards of society.
He makes the decision that he rather be dead to everyone in the town than have to cooperate with his abusive father anymore. This signals the independence that will continue to grow through the chapters. 1)How much can one endure till they change the situation?

2)Is racism logical? Stormy Weather
Ch. 12-15 "It was fifteen minutes before I could work myself up to go and humble myself to a nigger--but I done it, and I warn't ever sorry for it afterwards, neither." Pg. 89 Characters Setting Conflict What Huck Learns
and How He Changes Key Questions: Summary Huck and Jim have been floating down the Mississippi river in their raft. Huck and Jim come across a wrecked ship that Huck insists on going in inside. Once they get on board they overhear two men discussing the fate of a third man they tied up. The raft floated away while they were aboard, but Jim steals the men’s Skiff and supplies and he and Huck use that until they find the raft. After they find their raft again Huck goes ashore and finds a ferry watchman to try to save the robbers because he feels guilty for leaving them, but they find the wreck floating down the river and it has sunk further. Huck realizes that they have probably drowned. Jim is trying to reach Cairo but they can not see anything through the fog so they land on shore, but the raft floats aboard with Jim is still on it so Huck gets in the canoe to catch him. The next morning, Huck finds the raft with
Jim asleep on board and he decides to play a trick on Jim, saying that loosing each other was a dream,
but Jim realizes it was a trick and gets
mad at Huck. Huck Finn
Jim
The Watchman
Jim Turner
Bill
Jake Packyard Intellect Vs. Heart In these chapters Huck can view the situations from a simple intellectual standpoint or from an emotional aspect of thinking about others. For example: They stole the boat and it’s goods because they needed it and the criminals abroad suffered. On the other hand though, he felt bad and signaled the watchman. This same idea of emotion vs. intellect can be applied to his joke on Jim. Internal Jim and Huck set off together on the river and Huck realizes that they are more alike then he originally thought.
When Huck first boards the Walter Scott, he does it solely for his personal enjoyment. After the events play out, he understands that he cost people their lives and should have avoided the situation in general. He relates more to his conscience in this situation when he feels bad about what happened to the criminals, even if they deserved it.
There is a break through in the relationship between Huck and Jim in this episode. The joke Huck plays on Jim for his entertainment deeply hurts his best friend and Huck goes against the normalcy of society when he apologizes to a slave and views him as a person.
He finally understands that his
entertainment is not worth the
pain he brings other people. 1) Is personal enjoyment at the expense of others right or wrong?

2) How important is the role of a friend on the journey of life? Splinters
Ch. 16-18 "I was powerful glad to get away from the feuds, and so was Jim to get away from the swamp. We said there warn't no home like a raft, after all. Other places do seem so cramped up and smothery, but a raft don't. You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft." Pg. 1119 Summary Characters Setting Conflict What Huck Learns
and How He Changes Key Questions: Jim is excited about becoming a free man, but Huck
is starting to question helping to free a slave. Huck runs
into townspeople searching for runaway slaves and he has
to choose to cover for Jim or to let them capture him. He decides to cover for Jim and says that the man on board has smallpox, so the men give him money if he promises not to land anywhere near their town. Huck and Jim realize that they passed Cairo and make a plan to go up the river, but their plan is ruined and a ship crashes into their raft making them jump overboard and go to the shore. Huck and Jim are separated again due to the crash and, but Huck finds a family called the Grangerfords. The family takes him in and Huck befriends their son Buck. He learns that the family is in a feud with the Sheperdons. While delivering a note for the Grangerfords, a
slave takes Huck to Jim and the raft Jim has now
fixed. The next day the families realize that a
Grangerford (Miss Sophia) has eloped with Harvey
Sheperdson and the feud is at full force. After
seeing the men shoot and kill each
other Huck and Jim go back to the
river. Huck Finn
Jim
2 Slave Catchers
(Mr. Parker and John)
Grangerfords
Sheperdsons
Buck Grangerford
Emmeline Grangerford
Miss Sophia Life on the River Vs. Life on the Shore A steamboat smashes the raft that Huck and Jim have been living on. They are separated and Huck is forced to go back to the land and he becomes part of the Grangerfords’ family. He observes the feud and when he sees two people disregard it and the reactions of both families’, he realizes that life on the shore is complicated and riddled with problems compared to his life on the raft, which is simple and freeing. External Huck experiences his first encounter with slave catchers and is forced to choose between exposing Jim as a runaway slave or covering for him. He chooses not to tell, even though he knows he can be jailed for his actions.
When Huck first meets the Grangerford’s he does not understand the feud. But as he sees the affects of it on both families, he decides he would rather be with Jim and the river away from the conflicts in society. 1) How do you decide when to look out for yourself and when to put yourself on the line to help another person?

2) Do people attend church to further their spiritual life or just to go along with the standards of society? The Mourners' Bench
Ch. 19-20 "If I never learnt nothing else out of pap, I learnt that the best way to get along with his kind of people is to let them have their own way." Pg. 128 Summary Characters Setting Conflict What Huck Learns
and How He Changes Key Questions: While searching for berries, Huck comes upon two men and helps them escape. The men join Huck and Jim aboard the raft and tell them that they are a King and a Duke, but Huck realizes that they are both frauds. They form a partnership and stop at a small town that appears abandoned because everyone is a camp. The King goes to a meeting with Huck and tells them a story, which he said he repented and needed money so they give him eighty-seven dollars. The duke makes flyers that say Jim is a runaway slave from New Orleans, to remove attention from them during the day on the raft. Huck Finn
Jim
The Duke
The King
People at the Camp King and Duke Vs. Huck and Jim When the King and Duke are introduced into Huck and Jim’s lives they have conflicting lifestyles and slowly they take control of the raft and what they do. The King and Duke make Huck and Jim serve them as well as go along with all their frantics. Huck and Jim let this happen. External Huck decides that he rather have the company and no quarreling than reveal who the King and Duke really are. Huck does not want the trouble of going against someone and just tries appreciate the good.
Huck is changed by his need of acceptance by the King and Duke and their influence on him. He chooses not to stop the King and Duke in their schemes. 1) Should a person help the gullible or make them learn by themselves?

2) When does a person’s negative side outweigh their positive side? People and Plays
Ch. 21-23 "Them rapscallions took in four hundred and sixty-five dollars in that three nights. I never see money hauled in by the wagonload like that, before." Pg. 155 Summary Characters Setting Conflict What Huck Learns
and How He Changes Key Questions: The King and the Duke rehearse Shakespeare on the raft and then go ashore in Arkansas to put on a show. Huck witnesses a harmless drunk get killed by the man when he was shouting about while in town. The townspeople mob the killer’s house with the intent to lynch him, but he stands up on the roof and calls them cowards. After the Shakespeare show is unsuccessful, the King and the Duke advertise a show for men only, but don’t do anything to perform. The men get angry and plan to lynch the Duke and the King, but they sneak away
with Huck and Jim. Huck
Jim and his Family
Boggs
Boggs' Daughter
Colonel Sherburn
Buck Harkness
The Ring Master
The "Drunk Man" Gullible People Vs. Scammers In these episodes the main conflict is between the people that were mislead by the King and Duke and believed them, only to be scammed and displeased. These country folk are mislead time and time again and they go along with what everyone says, instead of thinking for themselves. External At the beginning Huck was amazed by the reciting of the Shakespeare and displayed the same gullibility the country folk will have. At the end he changes in being less gullible and realizes that the Kind and the Duke are FRAUDS.
The situation that develops between the towns people and Col. Sherburn reveals to Huck that people who go along with the crowd are less valued than people who think independently. At the end of this episode Jim becomes more of a father figure to Huck when he comprehends how much Jim cares of his children, in
comparison to Pap. 1) How long do you let a lie go on?

2) Are you more of a man if you prove your strength through violent actions or through leading and helping others to stand up for what they believe in? The Lure of Gold
Ch. 24-30 "'You talk like an Englishman--don't you? It's the worse imitation I ever heard. You Peter Wilks's brother. You're a fraud, that's what you are!'" Pg. 172 Summary Characters Setting Conflict What Huck Learns
and How He Changes Key Questions: Huck Finn
Jim
The King
The Duke
William Wilks
Harvey Wilks
Mary Jane Wilks
Susan Joana
Wilks
Dr. Robinson
Levi Bell
Hines
The Lawyer
The Undertaker
Peter Wilks (dead, but important) The Wilk’s Family Vs. The King and The Duke After the King and Duke find out about the fortune left to the Wilk’s brothers, they go and disguise themselves as the brothers so they can receive it. In this episode we see Huck being conflicted between helping the King and Duke or the new people he just befriended. External & Internal In the beginning of these chapters, Huck is going along with the schemes for the reward of friends. But as the novel progresses, we see the change in him as he cares about others and how his friends are affecting them. He goes to the extent of helping the Wilk’s instead of The King and The Duke.
Huck also changes when he realizes that sometimes truth is better then lies and understands the importance of honestly in society. He cannot hurt people in exchange
for his personal gain from this point
forward. 1)How do you choose who to trust?

2)When do you choose to go against someone you know for the benefit of others? Ties of Friendship
Ch. 31-33 "And for a starter, I would go to work and steal Jim out of slavery again' and if I could think of anything worse, I would do that, too; because as long as I was in, and in for good, I might as well go the whole hog." Pg. 217 Summary Characters Setting Conflict What Huck Learns
and How He Changes Key Questions: Huck Finn
Jim
The King
The Duke
Mrs. Phelps
Mr. Phelps
Phelps family
Tom Sawyer Life on the River Vs. Helping Jim After Jim is sold, Huck has the option of continuing his journey without Jim or risking his life and journey to help Jim continue on his own journey for freedom. We this clearly when he writes the letter to Miss Watson, but chooses not to send it. Also, he chooses to go onto land again and this symbolizes independence in him. Internal Huck changes when he follows his heart and his commitment to Jim, instead of what
society has brought him up to believe. He
whole heartdly decides to help Jim even if it
could cost him everything.
He also decides that he wants good company and good influences on him than have the company of others that may be
entertaining, but put him in an internal
conflict. 1) Would you, personally, risk everything to help a friend?

2) How far is too far when people betray you? Freedom of Knowledge
Ch. 34-43 Summary Characters Setting Conflict What Huck Learns
and How He Changes Key Questions This episode is at Pap’s small abandoned cabin which is up the river from St. Petersburg and in the woods near Widow Douglas' house. This episode begins on Jackson’s Island, which is a small island in the middle of the Mississippi not far from Pap’s cabin. Huck goes to Judith Loftus’ house in St. Petersburg and then goes back to island to start his and Jim’s journey down the river. Jim and Huck float down the Mississippi River and go aboard The Walter Scott, which is an abandoned steamboat they see on the river past St. Louis Missouri. Huck and Jim pass Cairo while on the Mississippi River, and Huck spends time at the Grangerfords’ house in a small town in Tennessee. The journey continues down the river and they stop at a small town in Arkansas called Pokeville. This town is filled with the stereotypical backwards country folk. On the shore, they travel to random small towns in Arkansas past Pokeville, well down the state of Arkansas. "'Turn him loose! he ain't no slave; he's as free as any cretur that walks this earth!'" Pg. 289 Huck Finn
Jim
Tom Sawyer
Aunt Sally
Uncle Silas
Phelps Family
Aunt Polly
The Crazed Slave Along the river, Huck and the King pick up a boy in
their canoe and learn all about a local rich man, Peter Wilks, who died and left his fortune to his brothers. The king and the Duke go into town and pose as the mourning brothers. They attend the funeral and acquire the money that Peter Wilks left. Huck talks to one of the daughters (Mary Jane Wilks) and decides to restore the money to its rightful owners. Huck takes the money, but is almost caught, so he is forced to hide it in Peter Wilks’ coffin. The king announces the estate will be sold, but also tries to break up a slave family, which the daughters are against. Huck reveals the Duke and King to Mary Jane Wilks but she keeps quiet, than Huck tells her where to find the gold. The real brothers show up and prove their claims by saying Peter Wilks has a tattoo
so they dig up the coffin to see who is the real
Wilks brothers. Huck, Jim, the Duke,
and the King escape. Now that the King is broke, he sells Jim for 40 dollars. Huck is furious and he ponders his choices and ends up writing a letter to Miss Watson, which relieves him form the sin of helping a slave escape. Huck realizes his friendship with Jim is too valuable to forget and he rips up the letter. He starts plotting to steal Jim back out of slavery. He ends up going to the Phelp’s farm, where he is greeted as Tom Sawyer. Back in town, Huck finds the real Tom and he agrees to help him free Jim. The Duke and the King are in town, and Huck tells the people that they’re con men, but before he
can warn the King or Duke, they’ve been
tarred and feathered. Huck and Tom disagree about how they should save Jim. They dig into Jim’s cabin and take a few weeks to go through with Tom’s plan that he found in books. They capture animals to put in Jim’s dungeon, but many are set free in the house by the Phelps boys. When it’s time for Jim’s escape, Tom tips off the Phelps, which leads to an escape amidst gunfire. When they get back to the raft, Tom has been shot in the calf. Huck gets a doctor for him and Jim refuses to leave until Tom is safe. They all end up back at the Phelps’ and the doctor vouches for Jim. When Tom wakes up he tells Sally that he and Huck are responsible, he demands Jim be set free because Miss Watson died and freed him in her will. Their true identities are revealed and Aunt Polly gets angry when she discovers that Tom has been stealing and hiding her letters in addition to causing her psychological pain. Tom gives Jim forty dollars for putting up with him. Jim reveals that the dead man in the house was Pap. Aunt Sally wants to adopt Huck, but Huck refuses to be try to be civilized again and goes off on his own. After they hear about a local rich man leaving his wealth too his two brothers Huck and Tom set out for the town where Peter Wilk's is going to be buried. The town is in Arkansas past Pokeville just before the Phelp’s farm in Arkansas. In this episode Huck is on the raft again in the Mississippi River and he decides to go to Phelp’s farm in Arkansas further down the Mississippi River to free Jim. This episode continues at The Phelps’s farm in Arkansas. Huck, Tom and Jim Vs. The Phelps In these episodes, Huck and Tom have now freed Jim and have to fight to keep Jim’s freedom. Farmers arrive with guns and Huck, Tom, and Jim have to try to get away safely and finish their journey to reach the free states. •Huck makes the risky decision to get a doctor to help
Tom after he is injured, even though it could get the three of
them especially Jim in trouble.
•After Aunt Sally refuses to let Huck out to find Tom, Huck
vows never to hurt her again because he realizes his
concern for Tom.
•Jim tells Huck that the body they saw in the beginning of
their journey was Pap, and Huck is relieved to
not have to be worried or concerned about what Pap has
done and what he might do.
•Huck plans to head west because he does not
want Aunt Sally to civilize him and is content
with who he is and does not want
to change. 1) Do you save yourself or the person who saved you?

2) What do you do you do after you have achieved your goal? External Internal
Full transcript