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Practice Prezi

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Claire Grassman

on 29 January 2013

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*everything you need to know...and more! Journey to STAAR


Victoria Young
Director of Reading, Writing, and
Social Studies Assessments
Texas Education Agency









STATE OF TEXAS ASSESSMENTS OF ACADEMIC READINESS (STAARTM)

Grades 3−8 Reading
Grades 4 and 7 Writing
English I, II, and III
Score Point 1—VERY LIMITED
Score Point 2—BASIC
Score Point 3—SATISFACTORY
Score Point 4—ACCOMPLISHED

Students need to have an
in-depth understanding of the writing rubric for each type of writing! STAAR Writing Rubric
Rubrics Summed Scores Weighting
Rubrics are the basis for assigning scores
Two readers score each student response. If there is perfect or adjacent agreement, the two readers’ scores are summed.
Summed scores range from 2−8
(0 = nonscorable) Scoring Model for STAAR
Scoring Model for STAAR
Weighting

Grade 4: compositions not weighted
Grade 7: compositions weighted by 2
English I: compositions weighted by 2
English II: compositions weighted by 2
English III: compositions weighted by 2 Scoring Model for STAAR Logically link their sentences within paragraphs and across paragraphs, understand what smooth progression looks like, and understand what interrupts the progression of writing
Understand the purpose of transitions, distinguish a perfunctory from a meaningful transition, know how to create different kinds of transitions between sentences, ideas, and paragraphs Requirements for Success STUDENTS MUST:
Understand what it means to be responsive to the prompt
Understand the concept of a controlling idea, distinguish a weak from an effective controlling idea, create a specific controlling idea
Distinguish between a focused and unfocused piece, sustain focus in their own writing, and understand the ways in which focus is lost? Requirements for Success Typical Problems in Lower-Scoring Responses
Wrong organizational structure/form for purpose
Weak, evolving, or nonexistent central idea/controlling idea
Wasted space: repetition, wordiness, meandering, meaningless introductions and conclusions (e.g., the “bed-to-bed” approach we often saw on TAKS)
Inclusion of too many different ideas for 1 page
General/vague/imprecise use of language or inappropriate tone for purpose
Essay poorly crafted
Weak conventions In a Nutshell—Lower Score Range Synthesizing across the Read, Think, Write. Some students scored 1s and 2s because they could not move from the stimulus (the “Read”) to the generalization (the “Think”) to the charge (the “Write about”). Students who did not synthesize information across the prompt tended to have these problems:
getting stuck in the stimulus
ignoring the charge and writing only about the “Think” statement STAAR Writing—What We’ve Learned So Far The effect of one page.
High scores require an economical use of space: tight, specific, logical development—no wasted words.
Short, effective introduction and conclusion.
Bottom line: Both planning and revision are absolutely essential since students don’t have the space to “write their way into” a better piece.
Students will have 2 blank pages per prompt
in the test booklet for planning purposes. STAAR Writing—What We’ve Learned So Far

Thesis. Having a central idea/controlling idea/thesis is essential in writing a focused and coherent expository piece, as well as a focused and coherent persuasive or analytical piece at the upper grades.
Personal narratives also need a narrow focus. STAAR Writing—What We’ve Learned So Far *Time limit of 4 hours per day for 2 days
-3 essays—at least 1 personal narrative, 1 expository, and an additional of either
-1 multiple choice revising/editing section

*Make-up testing opportunities for all grades and subjects

*Students taking STAAR Gr. 7 Writing and English I, II, III Writing may use dictionaries for the entire test (multiple-choice section and the written compositions) STAAR Info:
Weighting

Grade 4: compositions not weighted
Grade 7: compositions weighted by 2
English I: compositions weighted by 2
English II: compositions weighted by 2
English III: compositions weighted by 2 Scoring Model for STAAR
Scoring Model for STAAR
Score Point 1—VERY LIMITED
Score Point 2—BASIC
Score Point 3—SATISFACTORY
Score Point 4—ACCOMPLISHED

Students need to have an
in-depth understanding of the writing rubric for each type of writing! STAAR Writing Rubric Develop their ideas specifically, understand that how they develop their ideas depends on their purpose for writing
Use language that is specific to the purpose and creates an appropriate tone
Understand that writing correctly makes their essay clearer and more effective? Requirements for Success Form/purpose match. Many students scored 1s and 2s because their overall organizational structure and form did not match the purpose for writing or were weakly matched. Some students started out in the right form but then “drifted” into another purpose:
personal narrative instead of expository
fantasy instead of personal narrative
expository instead of personal narrative STAAR Writing—What We’ve Learned So Far Personal Narrative with Extension: Grade 7
my hair and I became late for the bus, I decided not to go to school. Later that day when my mom made it home, she told me I was in deep trouble. When I sat down to tell her about my situation, she sounded like she was frusturated with me, but I was wrong. It turned out that my mom gave me mercy. She told me that all I had to do was to apologize, so I did from the bottom of my heart.
Ever since that morning, I have always seen the mercy in the eyes of my parents. I learned that if I ever had to make a decision like that again, to go through with the hardest decision for me. In this case, it was doing my hair and going to school. The fact is that the most difficult decision turned out to be the decision I should have made.
(This composition was hand-written on 24 lines.)
STAAR Writing Prompt Personal Narrative with Extension: Grade 7 Overwhelming stress, headaches, confusion, and darkness. These are just a few of the memories of the time I made the most difficult decision in my life.
It was five o’clock on a school morning when my mom told me I would have to do my hair, get dressed, and get to the bus stop once she left to go visit my sister in the hospital. The only problem with that, was the fact that did not know how to do my own hair.
As soon as I got dressed, I called my mom on her cell phone. I tried telling her that I could not do my hair so I could not go to school. In her response, she told me that if I did not go to school, I would suffer consequences. I was in a pickle. I did not know whether to stay home or go to school. Since I tried to do
STAAR Writing Prompt Personal Narrative with Extension: Grade 7 Look at the picture below.

(symbolic picture of tree with carved hands pointing in different directions)


Sometimes it’s hard to make a decision because there are so many choices.


Write a personal narrative about a time when you had to make a decision. Be sure to write in detail about the choice you made and describe what happened as a result of your decision.
STAAR Writing Prompts—Scaffolding Personal Narrative : Grade 4
That night I dreamed I was a professional cyclist. I won every race I was a part of. Suddenly my wheel hit a rock and---my eyes jolted open. I tossed clean clothes on, rushed downstairs, had breakfast, and told my dad I was ready. I hopped back on the bike and started moving again, slowly my dad let go of my shoulders. I was doing it! I was riding a bike! I stopped and walked the bike back. I was proud of myself.
One weekend I even begged to go on a bike ride. He finally said yes and off we went.

(This composition was hand-written on 23 lines.)
STAAR Writing Prompt Personal Narrative : Grade 4 I learned how to ride a bicycle after being helped. One breezy afternoon, I was blowing bubbles in my front yard, and a man on a bicycle pedalled by. “Daddy, Daddy!” I cried. “I wanna try that!” “Okay. I’ll go get the bike and helmet,” he said, walking toward the side of the house, where we keep the bikes. Soon enough, there was a helmet strapped to my head, a bike beneath me, and a father beside me.
My legs began circling and I started rolling, my father jogging beside me ready to catch me if I tumble. Forgetting to turn, I skidded to a halt at the curb. A sharp pain stabbed my knee, and I felt something trickle down my leg. I stood up and limped back across the street, while my father rolled the bike next to me. “Maybe we should try again tomorrow,” he said gently. I nodded in agreement.
STAAR Writing Prompt Personal Narrative : Grade 4 Look at the picture below.

(picture of boy balancing a basketball on his finger)

It takes talent to balance a basketball on your finger.


Write about a time when you discovered that you were good at something.

Be sure to-

write about a personal experience
organize your writing
develop your ideas in detail
choose your words carefully
use correct spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and sentences
STAAR Writing Prompts—Scaffolding Personal narrative prompts contain a stimulus and are scaffolded, though less so than other prompts.
Grade 4—SE 17(A) write about important personal experiences
Grade 7—16(A) write a personal narrative that has a clearly defined focus and communicates the importance of or reasons for actions and/or consequences
Personal narratives must be realistic in nature.
No obvious “fantasy” papers. Literary writing: 16[A] at grade 4 and 15[A] at grade 7.)
STAAR Personal Narrative Expository: Grade 7 personal skills to help them grow as a person and to build meaningful relationships with others while doing it.
In life, you can’t do everything alone, you need the help of others. If everything was a one man job, then God wouldn’t have created two people, he would’ve created one, and that is why team work is much better.
(This composition was hand-written on 26 lines.)
STAAR Writing Prompt Expository: Grade 7 normally take a whole team. Unfortunately, this can lead them to become self-centered. Especially if they succeed at something they did alone. These kind of people see life as one big competition, and they have to shine in the spotlight alone; they have to receive all of the glory for everything that they do.
People who prefer to work as a team tend to show more of the ability to share, more compassion for others, and stronger and more meaningful relationships with others compared to someone who prefers to work alone. These people develop skills such as leadership skills, social skills, communication skills, and they learn how to depend on others. They see life as an opportunity to gain great
STAAR Writing Prompt Expository: Grade 4 of her friends. If I ever have a contest or competition, she’ll get me ready for it, cheer me on, and afterwards congradulate me no matter if I won or not. My sister also shares a lot of things with me. She’ll let me use her laptop if my computer isn’t working, let me borrow her calculator or other school supplies, let me use her extra chair, borrow one of her backpacks, she gives me any clothes that she’s grown out of, and let’s me try some food that she made. Elizabeth sort of goes with the flow even if something is bothering her. She is nice, smart, considerate, helpful, caring, patient, and, above all, an awesome sister!
(This composition was hand-written on 22 lines.)
STAAR Writing Prompt Expository: Grade 4 One person who is important or special in my life is my older sister, Elizabeth. She is fantastically wonderful in very many different ways. Whenever I need advice on something, I can talk to her and she’ll be very helpful. If I’m ever upset, she will always try her best to cheer me up and usually Elizabeth will at least make me grin or giggle. If I have homework or need to study but I’m confused and don’t understand it, she will explain it and teach it to me even though she normally has a stack of school work or something else she needs to finish. Every once in a while, when I’m dying of boredom, Elizabeth will do something fun with me like play a game or take me to the mall to see a movie with her and some
STAAR Writing Prompt
Expository prompts contain a stimulus and are scaffolded:

Read, Think, Write, Be Sure to −
STAAR Writing Prompts *Revising and editing portions of the multiple-choice section are separate, allowing students to focus on one set of skills at a time

*Revision is focused on effectiveness, strengthening/improving various aspects of a piece of writing: the introduction and conclusion, organization/progression, development, word choice, and sentences

*Editing is focused on correctness (conventions): capitalization, punctuation, spelling, grammar, usage, and sentence boundaries (fragments and run-ons) Revising and Editing STUDENTS MUST:
Understand the differences between revising and editing and do both equally well
Know what the rubric for each purpose requires of them as writers
Distinguish a poorly crafted essay from one that is well crafted?
Understand that the structure/form they use must “match” their purpose Requirements for Success Performance Labels 8 Provides a broader picture of students as writers
-Can you write effectively for different purposes?
Provides a more accurate assessment of the degree to which students are internalizing skills inherent in the writing process
-As students become more experienced writers, do you become better able to apply writing skills to actual writing tasks? Behind the STAAR Writing Design Scoring Model for STAAR


Victoria Young
Director of Reading, Writing, and
Social Studies Assessments
Texas Education Agency









STATE OF TEXAS ASSESSMENTS OF ACADEMIC READINESS (STAARTM)

Grades 3−8 Reading
Grades 4 and 7 Writing
English I, II, and III Typical Strengths in Higher-Scoring Responses
Explicit central or controlling idea
“Narrow and deep” development with no wasted words Quality over Quantity!
Introduction and conclusion: short but effective
Specific use of language and appropriate tone for purpose
Essay well crafted
Strong conventions (Remember:“Strong”doesn’t mean “Perfect”!) In a Nutshell—Higher Score Range Expository: Grade 7 There are two types of people in this world, those who prefer to work together as a team, and those who prefer to work alone as one player. The question is, Which one has a better look on life, and what does it say about their personality?
A person that prefers to work alone often shows independance, they do things themselves.This can be a great characteristic about someone, but it can also lead that person to never develop social and or team skills. Another thing about people who play alone is that they receive more glory, not having to share any that is, and whatever they perform has more of a “wow factor”, since they completed something by themself that would
STAAR Writing Prompt Expository: Grade 7 READ the following quotation.

A famous businessman once said, “Players win games;
teams win championships.”

THINK carefully about the following statement.

Sometimes you can accomplish good things by yourself but better things with other people.

WRITE an essay explaining whether it is better to work by yourself or with a group.

Be sure to-

clearly state your controlling idea
organize and develop your explanation effectively
choose your words carefully
use correct spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and sentences
STAAR Writing Prompts—Scaffolding
Rubrics Summed Scores Weighting
Rubrics are the basis for assigning scores
Two readers score each student response. If there is perfect or adjacent agreement, the two readers’ scores are summed.
Summed scores range from 2−8
(0 = nonscorable) Scoring Model for STAAR Expository: Grade 4 READ the information in the box below.

There are people in our lives who are special to us.
Sometimes this person is a teacher or coach, a parent,
a brother or sister, or even a friend.

THINK about the people you care about.

WRITE about one person who has been important to you. Explain what makes this person special.

Be sure to-

clearly state your central idea
organize your writing
develop your writing in detail
choose your words carefully
use correct spelling, capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and sentences
STAAR Writing Prompts—Scaffolding
Read: A short synopsis of some kind or a quotation

Think: The synopsis or quotation generalized and reworded

Write: A focused charge statement

Be Sure to: 4−5 bullets (state a central or controlling idea, organize your writing, develop your writing/explanation, choose your words carefully, a reminder to proofread for correct spelling, etc.)
STAAR Writing Prompts—Scaffolding
Expository
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