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Relationship Between Circulatory and Respiratory System

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Andrew Lynch

on 23 September 2013

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Transcript of Relationship Between Circulatory and Respiratory System

Relationship Between the Circulatory and Respiratory System
The first step of the respiratory system is breathing in oxygen through your nose. This passes through your nasal cavity which filters out the germs, viruses, etc. with hair-like follicles called cilia.
Here the oxygen and other components rush past the tongue, epiglottis, and pharynx. The pharynx is an important factor that aids in speech. The epiglottis keeps food from going down your trachea.
The larynx is the next place in which the air rushes past. It is vital for speech, and is commonly known as your voice box or vocal chords.
This long section is called the trachea. Cilia also lines the inside of the trachea, and serves the same purpose; to keep germs and viruses from getting through. Goblet cells, inside the trachea, produce mucus which also catches germs. The outside of the trachea is ringed with cartilage, which reinforces it.
This separation is one bronchus, or bronchi for plural. It also has rings of cartilage for extra support. The first separations are called primary bronchi , the second are secondary, and third are tertiary. The air goes through these two bronchi and further down into the bronchioles.
The bronchioles serve a similar function as the bronchi, but these do not have the rings of cartilage. They further open up into the alveoli.
The alveoli are the most important part of the respiratory system. They are the way oxygen gets from the air into your blood. Each alveolus is surrounded by capillaries which allow for diffusion. Oxygen diffuses into the capillaries and gets taken back to the heart. Carbon dioxide diffuses out and gets breathed out.
The whole process then repeats with every breath.
The right atrium receives de-oxygenated blood from the superior and inferior vena cava. It pumps it through the right AV valve to the right ventricle.
The right ventricle receives de-oxygenated blood from the right atrium and pumps it against gravity through the pulmonary semi-lunar valve, which goes through the left and right pulmonary arteries to the lungs.
The left atrium receives freshly oxygenated blood from the lungs, via the left and right pulmonary veins. It then pumps it through the left AV valve and into the left ventricle.
The left ventricle receives oxygenated blood from the left atrium. It pumps it through the aortic semi-lunar valve and the aorta. Since the left ventricle must pump blood all around the body, it is the strongest of the four chambers.
The aortic semi-lunar valve prevents back flow of blood from the left ventricle to the aorta. Without this valve the heat would be much less efficient.
The right AV valve prevents back flow from blood going from the right atrium to the right ventricle.
The pulmonary semi-lunar valve prevents the back flow of blood going from the right ventricle to the lungs.
The left AV valve prevents the back flow of blood from the right ventricle to the lungs.
The superior vena cava carries deoxygenated blood from the upper half of the body to the right atrium.
The inferior vena cava brings deoxygenated blood from the lower half of the body to the right atrium.
The left and right pulmonary arteries bring deoxygenated blood from the right ventricle to the lungs.
The pulmonary veins receive oxygenated blood from the lungs which direct it to the left atrium.
The aorta is the largest blood vessel in the human body. It takes oxygenated blood from the right ventricle and directs it around the body.
The SA node (sinoatrial node) is a group of cells that initiate the normal sinus rhythm of the heart.
The AV node (atrioventricular node) conducts electrical charges from the atria to the ventricles, therefore controlling the top of the heart.
Purkinje fibers allow the heart's conduction system to create synchronized contractions of its ventricles. This makes sure the heart is at a healthy rhythm.
Additional Info
Systole = phase of the heartbeat in which blood flows from the chambers into the arteries.

Diastole = the phase of the heartbeat when the heart muscles relax and allow bloodflow into the chambers.
Relationship
The circulatory and respiratory system are connected at the lungs. The circulatory needs oxygen form the lungs to pump the blood around the body and the respiratory system supplies the oxygen and gets the oxygen from the air into your bloodstream. Without either of these systems, the other would have no purpose. What's the point of oxygen if it can't get to your muscles and tissues? What's the point of blood without oxygen to drop off?
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