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Color Scheme Outfits

For Ms. Johnson
by

Maryann Heisler

on 7 February 2014

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Transcript of Color Scheme Outfits

Outfit's
That Follow Color Wheel's

There are 5 different type's of color scheme's you can follow there are:
Monochromatic
Analogous
Complementary
Triadic
Split - complementary

Split- Complementary
Monochromatic
Analogous
Triadic
The monochromatic color scheme uses variations in lightness and saturation of a single color. This scheme looks clean and elegant. Monochromatic colors go well together, producing a soothing effect. The monochromatic scheme is very easy on the eyes, especially with blue or green hues. You can use it to establish an overall mood. The primary color can be integrated with neutral colors such as black, white, or gray. However, it can be difficult, when using this scheme, to highlight the most important elements.

Pros: The monochromatic scheme is easy to manage, and always looks balanced and visually appealing.
Cons: This scheme lacks color contrast. It is not as vibrant as the complementary scheme.
Tips: 1. Use tints, shades, and tones of the key color to enhance the scheme.
2. Try the analogous scheme; it offers more nuances while retaining the simplicity and elegance of the monochromatic scheme.
The analogous color scheme uses colors that are adjacent to each other on the color wheel. One color is used as a dominant color while others are used to enrich the scheme. The analogous scheme is similar to the monochromatic one, but offers more nuances.

Pros: The analogous color scheme is as easy to create as the monochromatic, but looks richer.
Cons: The analogous color scheme lacks color contrast. It is not as vibrant as the complementary scheme.
Tips: 1. Avoid using too many hues in the analogous scheme, because this may ruin the harmony.
2. Avoid combining warm and cool colors in this scheme
Complementary
The complementary color scheme is made of two colors that are opposite each other on the color wheel. This scheme looks best when you put a warm color against a cool color, for example, red versus green-blue. The complementary scheme is intrinsically high-contrast.

When using the complementary scheme, it is important to choose a dominant color and use its complementary color for accents. Using one color for the background and its complementary color to highlight important elements, you will get color dominance combined with sharp color contrast.

Pros: The complementary color scheme offers stronger contrast than any other color scheme, and draws maximum attention.
Cons: This scheme is harder to balance than monochromatic and analogous schemes, especially when desaturated warm colors are used.
Tips: 1. For best results, place cool colors against warm ones, for example, blue versus orange.
2. If you use a warm color (red or yellow) as an accent, you can desaturate the opposite cool colors to put more emphasis on the warm colors.
3. Avoid using desaturated warm colors (e.g. browns or dull yellows).
4. Try the split complementary scheme; it is similar to the complementary scheme but offers more variety.
The triadic color scheme uses three colors equally spaced around the color wheel. This scheme is popular among artists because it offers strong visual contrast while retaining balance, and color richness. The triadic scheme is not as contrasting as the complementary scheme, but it looks more balanced and harmonious.

Pros: The triadic color scheme offers high contrast while retaining harmony.
Cons: The triadic color scheme is not as contrasting as the complementary scheme.
Tips: 1. Choose one color to be used in larger amounts than others.
2. If the colors look gaudy, try to subdue them.
The split complementary scheme is a variation of the standard complementary scheme. It uses a color and the two colors adjacent to its complementary. This provides high contrast without the strong tension of the complementary scheme.

Pros: The split complementary scheme offers more nuances than the complementary scheme while retaining strong visual contrast.
Cons: The split complementary scheme is harder to balance than monochromatic and analogous color schemes.
Tips: 1. Use a single warm color against a range of cool colors to put an emphasis on the warm color (red versus blues and blue-greens, or orange versus blues and blue-violets).
2. Avoid using desaturated warm colors (e.g. browns or dull yellows), because this may ruin the scheme.
By:
Maryann Nicole Heisler

Vertical Lines

Horizontal Lines
Diagonal Lines
Curved Lines
Natural Or Tubular Shape
Bell Shape
A vertical line is defined as a line that usually goes straight up and down, parallel to the y-axis of the coordinate plane. It has no slope and all the points.
The notion of line or straight line was introduced by ancient mathematicians to represent straight objects with negligible width and depth. Lines are an idealization of such objects.
A diagonal is a line joining two nonconsecutive vertices of a polygon or polyhedron. Informally, any sloping line is called diagonal. The word "diagonal" derives from the ancient Greek diagonios,[1] "from angle to angle" (from - dia-, "through", "across" and γωνία gonia, "angle", related to gony "knee"); it was used by both Strabo[2] and Euclid[3] to refer to a line connecting two vertices of a rhombus or cuboid,[4] and later adopted into Latin as diagonus ("slanting line").
In mathematics, in addition to its geometric meaning, a diagonal is also used in matrices to refer to a set of entries along a diagonal line.
noun
a line having no straight part; bend having no angular part
a thing or part having the shape of a curve
the act of curving, or the extent of this
the pronounced curving outline of a shapely female figure
1. Of or relating to a tube.
2. Constituting or consisting of tubes or a tube.
3. Shaped like a tube.
the shape of a bell
campana, bell
curve, curved shape - the trace of a point whose direction of motion changes
Symmetrical / Formal Balance
Asymmetrical
Emphasis
1. Special forcefulness of expression that gives importance to something singled out; stress: a lecture on housekeeping with emphasis on neatness; paused for emphasis, then announced the winner's name.
2. Special attention or effort directed toward something: a small-town newspaper's emphasis on local affairs.
3. Prominence given to a syllable, word, or words, as by raising the voice or printing in italic type.
Rhythm
Of or exhibiting symmetry.
1. Having no balance or symmetry.
1. Movement or variation characterized by the regular recurrence or alternation of different quantities or conditions: the rhythm of the tides.
2. The patterned, recurring alternations of contrasting elements of sound or speech.
3. Music
a. The pattern of musical movement through time.
b. A specific kind of such a pattern, formed by a series of notes differing in duration and stress: a waltz rhythm.
c. A group of instruments supplying the rhythm in a band.
4.
a. The pattern or flow of sound created by the arrangement of stressed and unstressed syllables in accentual verse or of long and short syllables in quantitative verse.
b. The similar but less formal sequence of sounds in prose.
c. A specific kind of metrical pattern or flow: iambic rhythm.

And Kayla Henry
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