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Bringing the Dolls

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on 10 December 2014

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Transcript of Bringing the Dolls

Born December 14, 1943, in Dingle, Iloilo, is a Filipina poet
She graduated Silliman University with an MA in Creative Writing in 1974.
She teaches at the Creative Writing Center, University of the Philippines Visayas Tacloban College.
Her awards include:
Lillian Jerome Thornton Award for Nonfiction
Don Carlos Palanca Memorial Award for Literature
National Book Award
Sunthorn Phu Literary Awards
Ani ng Dangal
Merlie Alunan
Bringing the Dolls
Two dolls in rags and tatters,one missing an arm and a leg,the other blind in one eye— I grabbed them from her arms,“No,” I said, “they cannot come.”

Each tight luggage
I had packed
only for the barest need:
No room for sentiment or memory
to clutter loose ends
my stern resolve.
I reasoned, even a child
must learn she can’t take
what must be left behind.

Her silence should have warned me
she knew her burdens
as I knew mine:her clean white years unlived
and mine paid.
She battened on a truth
she knew I too must own:
When what’s at stake
is loyalty or love,
hers are the true rights.
Her own faiths she must keep, not I.
Bringing the Dolls
The Author
And so the boat turned seaward,
a smart wind blowing dry
the stealthy tears I could not wipe. Then I saw—rags, tatters and all— there among the neat trim packs,the dolls I ruled to leave behind.
Poetic Persona
The persona in the poem is a mother who tries to escape from the past by leaving the seemingly unimportant (and essentially harsh) reminders of it.
Audience
The audience of this poem are the readers.
Content
The poem conveys a mother-daughter
relationship and the daughter's doll.
It revolved around the ragged and tattered
doll, which somehow represents violence or hideous events in their life. It is somehow about the life of a broken family. Like the description of the dolls. The dolls were missing an arm and
a leg and blind in one eye. It maybe refers to a father.
Theme
The poem tackles the awakening of a mother to the fact that her daughter is a different person from her capable of making her own decisions when it comes to matters of loyalty and love.
Vocabulary
1. Tatters - a torn piece hanging loose from the main part
2. Barest - without covering; naked; nude
3. Clutter - to fill or litter with things in a disorderly manner
4. Stern - firm, strict or uncompromising
5. Seaward - towards the sea
6. Stealthy - done, characterized by stealth; furtive
7. Battened - to feed glutonously or greedily; grow fat
Shape
The shape of the poem is
free verse.
Mood/Tone
Feeling of sadness and moving on.
The mood of the poem is something
like that because the poem mainly
talks about moving on and sacrificing
your own choice for the sake of other
people you love.
Figurative Language
The figures of speech used in the poem are metaphor, allusions, personification and symbolisms.
Imagery
Full transcript