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History of the Gas Laws

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Jennifer Havard

on 27 September 2015

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Transcript of History of the Gas Laws

Development of the Gas Laws
Important Properties of Gases
Scientists Who Investigated Gases
How are pressure and volume related?(keeping temperature and amount of gas constant)
States of Matter
Gases
What happens inside a propane tank when you:
fill it?
open it?
heat it?
cool it?
How are these properties related?
Pressure
Temperature

Volume


Robert Boyle
(1627-1691)
Jacques Charles
(1746-1823)
Joseph Gay-Lussac
(1778-1850)
Amedeo Avogadro
(1776-1856)
How are volume and temperature related?
(keeping pressure and amount of gas constant)
How are pressure and temperature related?
(keeping volume and amount of gas constant)


Amount of gas
How are gas quantity and volume related?
(keeping P and T constant)



Summary of the Gas Laws
Each scientist held two variables constant, while varying one and measuring the effect on a second.
How can we model what happens when several conditions change simultaneously?
Boyle's Law: P inversely proportional to V
Charles' Law: V directly proportional to T
Gay-Lussac's Law: P directly proportional to T
Avogadro's Law: V directly proportional to n
Kinetic Molecular Theory
where
n
is the number of moles of gas
note: all gases point to the same
temperature! (absolute zero)
Full transcript