Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM


Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.


Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks


Othello Character Analysis: Brabantio

Paul Smith

on 4 October 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Brabantio

An Insight into Brabantio a.k.a B-boy Bra • ban • ti • o Who is he? prominent citizen Venician Senator Desdemonda's Father Appearance Iago and Rodreigo wake up B-boy in the middle of the night to tell him that Othello has 'stolen' Desdemona.

At first he doesn't believe them however Iago's vulgarity persuades him. I.i B-boy does not hesitate when attempting to divorce Othello and Desdemona.

He sends a party to Othello, where the two lovers are 'making the beast with two backs' however his plans are thwarted as Othello is summoned by the Duke of Venice. I.ii Magnifico landowner I.iii Brabantio interrupts the military meeting and requests that all state business is put aside for his own grievance. His daughter has been stolen by none other than the Moor, Othello, by means of black magic.

However Othello explains and the claims are dismissed. This shows then how highly respected Othello is as, especially against a senator, a black man would've been arrested without question

In the end Desdemona chooses Othello over her father Character Xenophobic Powerful Protective arrogant Race Background Women of the era were meant to act in a certain way

They would be subservient (in the control of) men

Therefore Brabantio would be socked that his daughter is rebelling against him and secretly marry a black man

The audience would be equally shocked that a female would be behaving in such a manner

However it must be noted that although she may have shown rebellious qualities against her father she is totally subservient towards Othello Women's Subservience On the surface Brabantio has a very xenophobic nature this is clear when he makes accusations that Othello has used "black magic" to force his daughter to marry him However Othello's race may have been used as a scapegoat to try and get back his daughter.
Times past he has had no concern with race as he has invited Othello to dine with him on numerous occasions or "owner" This is clear as he requests the senate to put all state business aside for HIS own grievance So did I yours. Good your grace, pardon me;
Neither my place nor aught I heard of business
Hath raised me from my bed, nor doth the general care
Take hold on me, for my particular grief
Is of so flood-gate and o'erbearing nature
That it engluts and swallows other sorrows
And it is still itself. (I.iii) BRABANTIO
He must have great power within Venice as he is a Senator

When he requests that the senate to put all state business aside they oblige Brabantio is very protective of his daughter, in some ways he fears what the black Othello will do to her, this is clear as he is repulsed when Iago mentions "the beast with two backs" amongst other vulgarities.

Like most fathers, he is protective of his daughter, it is a natural physiological instinct that a parent bonds more with the opposite sex child, described by physiologist, Freud. Ay, to me.
She is abused, stol'n from me, and corrupted
By spells and medicines bought of mountebanks.
For nature so prepost'rously to err,
Being not deficient, blind, or lame of sense,
Sans witchcraft could not. BRABANTIO
Her father loved me; oft invited me;
Still question'd me the story of my life,
From year to year, the battles, sieges, fortunes,
That I have passed.
I ran it through, even from my boyish days,
To the very moment that he bade me tell it Othello In Shakespeare's time very little was known of people of people of different race. Rumours run rife concerning witch craft

Common paintings of that era depicted Satan as a black man

Moors were commonly stereotyped as sexually overactive, prone to jealousy and general wickedness.

"Blackness" was associated with corruption This created a backdrop to the audience's initial perception of Othello
Selfish He believes that his daughter is his 'property'
Brabantio Down with him, theif! "theif" is this quote shows that B-boy believes that, like propert, his daughter has been stolen.

He does not believe that his daughter would marry a black person

He does not ask his daughter before he atempts to arrest Othello showing that i the matter his daughter would have no say Consider ... Would Brabantio have had the same reaction when discovering that his daughter had a secret marriage if Othello was not of a different race To a certain extent Brabantio would have been angered that his daughter had a secret marriage however there is the point that his daughter may not have needed to get married in secret if Othello was not black as it would not have provoked a reaction Why is there no mention of Brabantio's wife in the text There is no certainty that Barbantio's wife is still living as there is no mention of her in Othello. If this is the case then this could be a reason why Brabantio feels so strong to protect his daughter, as possibly he has no one left

Shakespeare may not have wanted to add the wife in as show would have no role within the play furthermore this character may distract our attention away from the relationship between father and daughter what are the audiences perception of Brabantio The Shakespearean audience would be on Brabantio's side as not only is his daughter rebellious but she has married a black man - both uncommon and frowned upon at the time

Modern audiences would view him as racist and sexist That's All Folks Questions?
Full transcript