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Hamlet Mind Map

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Niki Rox

on 27 July 2017

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Transcript of Hamlet Mind Map

"Hamlet"
The Written Play vs The 1996 Movie
Characters
Setting
Themes
HAMLET (1996) - WINSLET, KATE; BRANAGH, KENNETH. Photography. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016.
quest.eb.com/search/144_1527257/1/144_1527257/cite. Accessed 24 Jul 2017.
Argyle, Michelle. Kenneth Branagh as Hamlet in the 1996 film version of Hamlet. Digital image. The Literary Lab. Blogger, 21 May 2009. Web. 25 July 2017.
<http://literarylab.blogspot.ca/2009/05/create-foil.html>
.
Kenneth Branagh's 1996 adaptation of
Hamlet
is an accurate representation of Shakespeare's intentions through the depiction of characters, settings and themes.
HAMLET (1996). Photography. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016.
quest.eb.com/search/144_1474060/1/144_1474060/cite. Accessed 25 Jul 2017
Hamlet. Dir. Kenneth Branagh. Perf. Kenneth Branagh. 1996. FMovies. Web. 25 July 2017.
<https://fmovies.is/film/hamlet.zlk2p/5v5240>.
Loops, Orbo. The Hall at Elsinore. Digital image. Imgur. N.p., 8 July 2015. Web. 25 July 2017.
<http://imgur.com/gallery/BsMngfq>.
In the scene below, Hamlet insults Ophelia in various ways, such as when he says: "Get thee to a / nunnery, go." (III. I. 138-139). However, the specific setting both Ophelia and Hamlet are in shows that Hamlet is just pretending to be a mad man. As Hamlet is acting crazy and manhandling Ophelia, he is opening a bunch of doors in the grand hall of the castle. This means that Hamlet knows he has an audience as he keeps looking behind the doors to find the people spying on him, giving him the perfect incentive to carry out his plan for revenge by acting insane. The use of these doors helps communicate Shakespeare's intentions, as it shows that Hamlet is not legitimately mad.
This connects to a very important theme that Shakespeare communicates throughout the play: appearance vs reality. This is demonstrated as Hamlet is appearing to be mad, when in fact he is not; he is just pretending to be to execute his plan for revenge.
Theatrical mask on a white background.. Clip Art. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016.
quest.eb.com/search/186_1622756/1/186_1622756/cite. Accessed 25 Jul 2017.
Furthermore, it connects to Hamlet's character and what Shakespeare tries to say about him. Shakespeare expresses how revenge has consumed Hamlet's mind, adversely affecting him and the people around him. He is too focused on avenging his father, that sometimes he cannot see straight. For example: he is mistreating the girl he presumably loves and is saying harsh things to her, not realizing the negative impact it will have on her, just to fulfill his plan. This can be seen when he keeps messing around with Ophelia and her feelings, especially when he says: "I / loved you not." (III. I . 120-121).
Vaghela, Sejal. Hamlet and Ophelia . Digital image. Blogger. N.p., 19 Oct. 2013. Web. 25 July 2017.
<http://vaghelasejal1315.blogspot.ca/2013/10/ophelias-madness-in-hamlet.html>.
Claudius
Hamlet. Dir. Kenneth Branagh. Perf. Kenneth Branagh. 1996. FMovies. Web. 25 July 2017.
<https://fmovies.is/film/hamlet.zlk2p/5v5240>.
The way Derek Jacobi portrays Claudius in act 3 scene 2 successfully mirrors Shakespeare's intentions for this character. His reaction to the little skit Hamlet prepares confirms that he is guilty for the death of Old Hamlet. Not only does he look suspicious, but he also storms out of the theater: "Turn on the lights. Get me out of here!" (III. II. 254). This is adept to Shakespeare's objectives because by showing Claudius' guilty reaction to the skit, we can infer that Hamlet now knows of his crime, allowing the plot to develop as Hamlet can now move forward with his plan for revenge.
This connects to the theme of appearance vs reality, which Shakespeare really articulates in the script. At the start of the play, as shown in the movie, Claudius expresses his grief towards his brother's death: "I still have fresh memories of my brother the / elder Hamlet’s death" (I. II. 1-2). However, this is just an act to conceal his treachery. Claudius does not care about Old Hamlet's demise, as he is the cause of it. We see through this facade when he proves to be guilty based on his reaction to Hamlet's skit. Therefore, Claudius demonstrates this theme because he appears to be a loving person with good intentions, when in fact he is manipulative, cunning and hiding behind his throne.
Mirror
This gives us a more profound understanding of Hamlet that Shakespeare illustrates, as it expresses his melancholic and depressive nature. It also portrays one of his flaws, indecisiveness, which causes many moments of inaction during the play, as is displayed in the movie.
Harris, Mirabelle. Setting of Hamlet’s famous soliloquy in Kenneth Branagh’s Hamlet. Digital image. WordPress. N.p., 2016. Web. 25 July 2017.
<http://engl311.ucalgaryblogs.ca/2016/10/17/mirabelle-harris-eze-scene-comparison-zeffirellis-hamlet-1990-and-branaghs-hamlet-1996/>.
The mirrors are an important part of the setting, especially during Hamlet's most famous soliloquy. As he is reciting it, he stands in front of a mirror. Mirrors usually represent truth in literature, and this pertains to the play as Hamlet reveals his inner most thoughts in front of one. He shares his inner conflict with us, as he says: "To be, or not to be? That is the question— / Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer / The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, / Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, / And, by opposing, end them?" (III. I. 57-61). This depicts Shakespeare's objectives because it shows Hamlet facing indecision about death, as he contemplates suicide.
The Winter
The movie is set in the winter time, which mirrors the situation Shakespeare presents in the play. The winter may represent death and pain, which are two things that are extremely common throughout the play. This demonstrates the use of pathetic fallacy in the movie, as nature sympathizes with the plot. The destructive nature of the winter mirrors the state of Denmark, which can be seen when Marcellus says: "Something is rotten in the state of Denmark." (I. IV. 95).
Konow, Rolf. Hamlet. Digital image. Still Photographer . N.p., 2007. Web. 25 July 2017.
<http://www.konow.dk/Film/Pict_detail.asp?ID=15&photo=516>.
Jenson, Michael. Kenneth Branagh 10. Digital image. N.p., 2009. Web. 25 July 2017.
<http://michaelpjensen.com/home_page/hamlet_1996_page_3>.
Revenge is futile and destructive
Shakespeare effectively conveys this theme through his play
Hamlet
. Kenneth Branagh's adaptation of the play, for the most part, stays true to this concept. This can be seen in the film as many of the characters die tragic deaths due to several plans of revenge that are carried out through other characters. A total of eight people die: Polonius, Ophelia, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Gertrude, Laertes, Claudius and Hamlet. Their deaths are all devastating, further proving how fatal the repercussions of revenge are.

Ophelia's death: "One woe doth tread upon another’s heel, / So fast they follow.—Your sister’s drowned, Laertes." (IV. VII. 159-160)

Laertes' death: "Why, as a woodcock to mine own springe, Osric. I / am justly killed with mine own treachery." (V. II. 302-303)

Gertrude's death: "No, no, the drink, the drink! Oh, my dear Hamlet! The / drink, the drink! I’ve been poisoned." (V. II. 305-306)

Hamlet's death: "Horatio, I am dead. / Thou livest. Report me and my cause aright / To the unsatisfied." (V. II. 333-335)

Hamlet Blu-ray, Audio Quality. Digital image. Blu-ray. N.p., 17 Aug. 2010. Web. 25 July 2017.
<http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Hamlet-Blu-ray/10381/>.
Play clip
Play gif
Play clip
Works Cited
Argyle, Michelle. Kenneth Branagh as Hamlet in the 1996 film version of Hamlet. Digital image. The Literary Lab. Blogger, 21 May 2009. Web. 25 July 2017.
<http://literarylab.blogspot.ca/2009/05/create-foil.html>

Hamlet. Dir. Kenneth Branagh. Perf. Kenneth Branagh. 1996. FMovies. Web. 25 July 2017.
<https://fmovies.is/film/hamlet.zlk2p/5v5240>.

Hamlet Blu-ray, Audio Quality. Digital image. Blu-ray. N.p., 17 Aug. 2010. Web. 25 July 2017.
<http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Hamlet-Blu-ray/10381/>.

HAMLET (1996). Photography. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016.
quest.eb.com/search/144_1474060/1/144_1474060/cite. Accessed 25 Jul 2017

HAMLET (1996) - WINSLET, KATE; BRANAGH, KENNETH. Photography. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016.
quest.eb.com/search/144_1527257/1/144_1527257/cite. Accessed 24 Jul 2017.

Harris, Mirabelle. Setting of Hamlet’s famous soliloquy in Kenneth Branagh’s Hamlet. Digital image. WordPress. N.p., 2016. Web. 25 July 2017.
<http://engl311.ucalgaryblogs.ca/2016/10/17/mirabelle-harris-eze-scene-comparison-zeffirellis-hamlet-1990-and-branaghs-hamlet-1996/>.

Jenson, Michael. Kenneth Branagh 10. Digital image. N.p., 2009. Web. 25 July 2017.
<http://michaelpjensen.com/home_page/hamlet_1996_page_3>.

Konow, Rolf. Hamlet. Digital image. Still Photographer . N.p., 2007. Web. 25 July 2017.
<http://www.konow.dk/Film/Pict_detail.asp?ID=15&photo=516>.

Loops, Orbo. The Hall at Elsinore. Digital image. Imgur. N.p., 8 July 2015. Web. 25 July 2017.
<http://imgur.com/gallery/BsMngfq>.

Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. New York: Modern Library, 2008. Print

Theatrical mask on a white background.. Clip Art. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016.
quest.eb.com/search/186_1622756/1/186_1622756/cite. Accessed 25 Jul 2017.

Vaghela, Sejal. Hamlet and Ophelia . Digital image. Blogger. N.p., 19 Oct. 2013. Web. 25 July 2017.
<http://vaghelasejal1315.blogspot.ca/2013/10/ophelias-madness-in-hamlet.html>.
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