Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Julius Caesar Intro Lecture

No description
by

Laura Randazzo

on 13 February 2018

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Julius Caesar Intro Lecture

Julius
Tragedy
Shakespeare
Setting
44 B.C.
By the way...
Concerns
Main
Julius
Caesar
Beloved military leader
Member of triumvirate
Rome's future king?
Has epilepsy
Possibly infertile
Mark
or
Themes
Who we are in public
Necessity of compromise
Use of rhetoric
So, now you know what
Let's grab a copy of the play
you need to know.
Any questions?
The

Cassius
Longtime military general
Has known Caesar
a long time
Hates Caesar and doesn't respect him
A main conspirator against Caesar
Brutus
Friend of both Caesar and Cassius
Like Cassius, fears Caesar might abuse power
Weighs friendship vs. what's right for Rome
Will join conspiracy against Caesar
Caesar's faithful friend/Right-hand man
Believes Caesar should be king
Later, Mark Antony will have a famous
affair with Cleopatra, the last
pharaoh of Ancient Egypt

Fate vs. Free will
Calpurnia
Timeless
Random Trivia
Julius Caesar
is believed to be the first of Shakespeare's
plays performed
at the Globe Theatre
of

Caesar
Video Preview
Roman Empire
Rome
William
Characters
Antony
Wife of Caesar
Has vivid dreams
Voice of concern
and reason
Portia
Wife of Brutus
Worried about her husband
An intense woman
Festival to avert evil spirits and purify the city
Designed to worship Lupa, the she-wolf who raised the two infant orphans Romulus and Remus, who eventually founded the city of Rome
Lupercal
Feast of
Feb. 13-15
During the feast, young men would run through Rome, swatting women with a scourge whip dipped in animal blood.
Believed to fix infertility.
Caesar's wife, Calpurnia, hasn't yet conceived a child, so she'll definitely be swatted.
Rome's
Feast of Lupercal eventually evolved into
St. Valentine's Day
Yes...
THAT Cleopatra
Click here
(Wait 10 seconds – Audio begins before video)
Tale
Can be staged in Ancient Rome
can be altered to apply to
modern conflicts, such as...
an African nation facing a coup
The struggle for power amidst inmates in prison
or even a high school power grab to dethrone a Queen Bee
Click here
Good people are often driven to do bad things in their pursuit of wealth, fame, and/or power.
Do you agree or disagree with this statement?
Explain your stance, being sure to write about a real situation/situations from your own life or things you've witnessed in our larger culture.

Your quickwrite needs to be at least two-thirds of a page.
Quickwrite:
Who we are in private
vs.
to sway others
Humanity's propensity
toward violence
First Triumvirate
Three leaders
Power shared
Background
Killed in battle
Caesar sees chance to gain full control; brings army to attack Pompey
Pompey runs away; later killed in Egypt
Rome's problem
Elite Class vs. Commoners
Imperialism vs. Republic
Who will rule Rome?


One
or
all?
This was England's problem, too
In 1599, when Shakespeare wrote this play, England was facing the same questions about how the country should be ruled.
Queen Elizabeth I was 66, aging and never married. She had no heirs. People were worried about the future of their country and arguing about monarchy vs. democracy.

Due to censorship, people weren't allowed to publicly debate such matters, but that didn't
stop Shakespeare from weighing in with his opinion.
Censor me? As if!
I'll just write a play about this mess, instead.
That'll show 'em!
and get started!
Crassus
Pompey
Caesar
Caesar
wins!
Patricians
Plebians
Their story is told in a different Shakespearean play,
Antony and Cleopatra
Full transcript