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Making Inferences

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by

John Vergara

on 9 October 2014

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Transcript of Making Inferences

Objectives:
Making Inferences
I will be able to define
inference
.
We can infer...
What can we infer?
The process of making logical guesses based on
clues in a text
and one's own personal knowledge and experience.
Making inferences from a text:
We can infer that...
What can we infer?

Maria was excited about tonight.

Happily, she put on her big, red shoes and bright, colorful outfit.
Her mom helped her paint her face white with a big red circle on each cheek.
Just before Maria ran out the door to meet her friends, she attached a large, red, squeaky nose to her face & placed a bright pink, pointy hat on top of her head.

She grabbed an empty bag and ran out into the night.
An inference is a
logical guess
based on your own personal
knowledge
and
experience
.
What is an inference?
Making Inferences
Reading 7.1: Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
I will be able to define
textual evidence
.
I will be able to read a text closely to
make inferences
.
I will be able to analyze an author's words to determine several pieces of
textual evidence
that
support
my inferences.
Imagine you ate a lot of garlic for dinner, & didn't brush your teeth that night or the next morning, & then you said "Good morning!" to your mom. If she runs away from you,

you can probably
infer
...
Your little brother leaves the room and slams the door after him.
We can infer...
What can we infer about this dog?
We can infer...
Inference About Character

Although Grace was sixty-four years old, she was as active as a boy and worked with smooth dexterity. When she saw me walking towards her, she hurriedly picked up the four-foot rattlesnake who had been sunning himself while his box was cleaned and poured him into his cage.
--Daniel Mannix, "A Running Brook of Horror"
What can we infer about Grace?
What do we know? What information are we given explicitly?
Grace is 64, but active.
Grace picks up rattlesnakes.
She works with smooth dexterity.

What is our personal past experience & knowledge?
What do I know about rattlesnakes?
My inference:
(what kind of personality trait is Grace displaying?)
I can infer that Grace is... because...
Nadra exited the plane & immediately felt the warm tropical breeze blow against her face. As she walked in the direction of the small air terminal, thoughts crowded her mind. Having grown up in Chicago, her Christmas vacations were usually very different, spent in the chilly Midwest. She'd never been somewhere like this, a paradise accessible only by plane or boat.
Inference About Setting
What is known?
(What are the clues?)
We can infer... because...
(use textual evidence to prove it!)
because...
because...
(What is the evidence?)
because...
(What is the evidence?)
because, in the text, it says that...
What is our textual evidence?
What can we infer?
Mr. Robinson was at the park with his family. He was the family cook and stood at the grill cooking hot dogs while everyone else swam in the river nearby. The little boy had been standing by the tree for a few minutes before Mr. Robinson really noticed him.
"Do you need any help?" the boy asked.
"No, I think I have it under control!" Mr. Robinson chuckled. Then he noticed the boy's dirty t-shirt & ragged pants. "I might need some help eating all of these hot dogs though," he said. "I think I may have cooked too many. Would you like one?"
"Okay," the boy said. "I wouldn't want you to have too many."
What is our textual evidence?
Let's take a couple minutes to quickly practice real-life inference, using Quick Starter!
Full transcript