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Student Motivation

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John Lowry

on 24 November 2014

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Transcript of Student Motivation

What do we mean when we say, "Johnny just isn't motivated?"
The general desire or willingness of someone to do something. (usually what we want them to do!)
A student’s lack of effort and poor motivation is a primary explanation for unsatisfactory academic performance (Hidi & Harackiewicz, 2000).

What does the research say about motivation?
Early research on motivation related to academic settings was focused on the idea that motivation was either intrinsic or extrinsic (Harter, 1981).
The academic benefit of more internal motivation has shown in various studies (Ryan & Deci, 2001; Lepper, et al, 2005).
This research established several factors that influence motivation in academic settings (Ryan & Deci, 2001; Lepper, et al, 2005). Goals, self efficacy, interest, and autonomy are motivational facets that emerge from the major theories on academic motivation (Ford, 1992; Dweck & Leggett, 1998; Ames, 1992; Urdan & Turner, 2005; Hidi & Harackiewicz, 2000; Bandura, 1997; Schunk & Pajares, 2005; Ryan & Deci, 2000).

Prominent Theories
Expectancy-Value Theory
Goal Theory
Intrinsic-Extrinsic Theory
Attribution Theory
What these theories have in common
Research established several factors that influence motivation in academic settings (Ryan & Deci, 2001; Lepper, et al, 2005). Goals, self efficacy, interest, and autonomy are motivational facets that emerge from the major theories on academic motivation (Ford, 1992; Dweck & Leggett, 1998; Ames, 1992; Urdan & Turner, 2005; Hidi & Harackiewicz, 2000; Bandura, 1997; Schunk & Pajares, 2005; Ryan & Deci, 2000).

Goals
Self-Efficacy
Interest
Autonomy

Knowing this, why is motivation still a common problem?

Classroom Clip

My Research
Data collected through interviews
Looking for insights into those 4 big theories.

Was there one theory that these successful teachers applied to get students motivated?
Results
Relative to the theories
Attribution Theory- 26
EVT- 61
Intrinsic-Extrinsic- 52
Goal Theory- 94
The big surprise!
Phenomenon of Care- 111
How does this help me?
An ethic of care in the classroom was the primary tool used to motivate students.
It emerged in the following ways:
Autonomy supportive classrooms via differentiation
Classroom community
Connecting with students over interests
Classrooms that are supportive of student competency
GOAL!
Student Motivation
What are great teachers dong to successfully motivate students?
Full transcript