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Levels of Inquiry: Bloom's versus Costa's

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Nicole Hughes

on 6 December 2016

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Transcript of Levels of Inquiry: Bloom's versus Costa's

Levels of Inquiry
:
Bloom's
versus
Costa's
LEQ: What are the different levels of inquiry? How can I apply these levels of thinking to my education?

Level 1: Text Explicit
Lower-Order Thinking Skills (LOTS)
Level 2: Text Implicit
Higher-Order Thinking Skills (HOTS)
Level 3: Experience Based
Higher-Order Thinking Skills (HOTS)
Why use Inquiry anyway?
What does inquiry mean?
Who are Bloom and Costa?

Bloom's
Remembering
Students can:
recall or remember
the information
recognize
specific information
Understanding
Students can:
explain
ideas or concepts
understand
information provided
Costa's
Gathering Information
Student can:
identify and recall
information
AKA (also known as)
Right There Questions
The answer to the question is found right in the text
Bloom's
Applying
Students can:
use
the information in a similar situation
apply
learning concepts, strategies, and theories in a new way
Analyzing
Students can:
distinguish between
the different parts
explore and understand
relationships
Costa's
Processing Information
Students can:
make sense
out of information;
process
the information gathered by
making connections and creating
relationships

AKA (also known as)
Author and Me
To answer this question, the reader will use information in the text and combine it with prior knowledge
Bloom's
Evaluating
Students can:
justify
a stand or decision
judge
the value of an idea or item by creating and applying standards
Creating/Synthesizing
Students can:
generate
new ideas, products or points of view
combine
ideas/thoughts
to develop
an innovative idea, solution or way of thinking
Costa's
Applying Information
Students can:
apply and evaluate
actions, solutions and connections made in order to predict
AKA (also known as)
On My Own
The answer will come from the reader's personal experiences and prior knowledge, to think beyond the text and give opinions
The Importance of Inquiry
Levels of Inquiry are part of the way we
communicate
with each other. It helps you not only to
read
but to
understand
and
relate to
what you're reading. It also assists with
discussion
. Asking questions promotes
engaging
conversations.
All levels of questions are important
, necessary, and serve a purpose depending on the situation.
Sometimes we need
lower levels of questions to gain information
, but being able to define a word or remember a fact isn't an end in itself.
It's
how we use that information that helps us truly learn, and it's how we apply that information
that is most important.
Levels of Inquiry are important because if you know what type of question is being asked, you know what kind of answer to provide
.

It takes real understanding of a topic to ask a "good question."
What does this mean? Think about this...inquiry helps uncover one's understanding.
-take a minute to write your ideas in your new notes column
Benjamin Bloom
American educational psychologist who made contributions to the classification of educational objectives and to the theory of mastery-learning (wikipedia)
“The goal of the inquiry method is to help students become more aware of the range of problem-solving and critical-thinking behaviors available to them and to improve their ability to apply these behaviors when they are confronted with a problem to which they have no ready answer.”
Arthur Costa
What does this mean?
Level one questions focus on
gathering and recalling
information, causing students to input data into
short-term memory
, however, if the data is not used in a meaningful way, it will soon be forgotten.
Examples: define, describe, find, identify, list, recite, recall, spell, match, label, choose
What does this mean?
Students need to
combine information
in a
new way
and
make sense
of gathered information.
Examples: analyze, compare, contrast, infer, distinguish, examine
What does this mean?
Students
evaluate
the information and decide what is right and wrong about it and what would happen if something changed. Asking lots of
"what if"
questions.
Examples: evaluate, judge, speculate, imagine, predict, hypothesize, assess
You try...
Use the picture to the left to generate one of each level.

Level 1 Right there (answer found in picture)

Level 2 Author and Me (answer uses picture and bits of prior knowledge)

Level 3 On My Own (no right or wrong to answer as long as support is provided)
Inquiry--the art of asking questions.
Full transcript