Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

"The Man He Killed" by Thomas Hardy

No description
by

Laura McKenzie

on 19 November 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of "The Man He Killed" by Thomas Hardy

"The Man He Killed" by Thomas Hardy
FONTS
"Had he and I but met
By some old ancient inn,
We should have sat us down to wet
Right many a
nipperkin!

"But ranged as
infantry
,
And staring face to face,
I shot at him as he at me,
And killed him in his place.

"I shot him dead because —
Because he was my
foe
,
Just so: my foe of course he was;
That's clear enough; although

"He thought he'd
'list
, perhaps,
Off-hand like — just as I —
Was out of work — had sold his
traps

No other reason why.

"Yes; quaint and curious war is!
You shoot a fellow down
You'd treat if met where any bar is,
Or help to
half-a-crown
."
Endstop, Enjambment, & Punctuation
Pre-Reading Activity: Anticipation Guide
Please read the following statements and write down whether you agree or disagree with each statement. You will be using your responses later, so write each one down carefully.
Background Information
Before starting the poem, click on the link below to learn more about the author, Thomas Hardy.
http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/thomas-hardy

After reading the biography, please write down what you think the poem, "The Man He Killed" will be about.
1. Killing people is always wrong.
2. People we go to war with are our enemies.
3. Sometimes war is the only way to fix a problem.
4. Fear is more powerful than morality.
5. Pressure to conform drives people to act out of character.
"The Man He Killed"
"Had he and I but met
By some old ancient inn,
We should have sat us down to wet
Right many a nipperkin!

"But ranged as infantry,
And staring face to face,
I shot at him as he at me,
And killed him in his place.

"I shot him dead because —
Because he was my foe,
Just so: my foe of course he was;
That's clear enough; although

"He thought he'd 'list, perhaps,
Off-hand like — just as I —
Was out of work — had sold his traps —
No other reason why.

"Yes; quaint and curious war is!
You shoot a fellow down
You'd treat if met where any bar is,
Or help to half-a-crown."
Annotating a poem
-The quotes suggest that someone is speaking.
-The phrase, "had he and i but met" demonstrates the formality of the speaker.
-"nipperkin" is an unfamiliar word, but may have something to do with eating or drinking at an inn. To find out, I looked it up and found out that a nipperkin is a small cup.
-It sounds like the speaker met this man somewhere other than an inn, and he was not able to sit and have a drink with him in a casual setting.
Now that you have seen some of the techniques used to annotate a poem, please write your own annotations for the rest of the poem. Using context clues, make some educated guesses for what the highlighted words mean. Then look up the dictionary definitions like I did with the word nipperkin. Make sure to explain how you came to your conclusions.



The use of commas, dashes, semicolons, ellipses, etc. The use of punctuation may change the way that you read and interpret a poem.
-The first line uses endstop. When I read it aloud, the dash tells me to pause between lines, and it sounds as though the speaker is thinking about why he shot the man.

-The second line also uses endstop, but the comma tells me that the second and third lines are related in some way.

-The third line uses endstop, and the semicolon tells me that the third and fourth lines are separate, but related thoughts. The use of a semicolon also tells the reader to stop and pause between lines.

-The fourth line uses enjambment because there is no punctuation at the end. This tells me to keep reading without pausing between stanzas.
"I shot him dead because —
Because he was my foe,
Just so: my foe of course he was;
That's clear enough; although
The use of punctuation at the end of a line in a poem.
When a line in a poem runs on without punctuation.
Now that you have learned
about punctuation in poetry,
please find any 5 examples of endstop enjambment, or
punctuation within the poem.
Following my examples, explain
the purpose/effect of the
punctuation.


Analyzing
Using your annotations and notes on endstop, enjambment, and punctuation, work with a partner to put each stanza of the poem in your own words. Discuss what you think the overall meaning of the poem is with your partner.
Post-Reading Activity
Without looking back at your pre-reading responses, please respond to the anticipation guide below. Consider what you have learned from reading/analyzing the poem.
Homework:
For homework, please type out your responses to both the pre-reading and post-reading anctipation guides. Include a paragraph that explains why you either agreed or disagreed with the statements, along with an explanation of why you think you changed your mind after reading the poem. If you did not change your mind on any of the statements, please explain why you think this was the case.
1. Killing people is always wrong.
2. People we go to war with are our enemies.
3. Sometimes war is the only way to fix a problem.
4. Fear is more powerful than morality.
5. Pressure to conform drives people to act out of character.
Full transcript