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Million Dollar Sacagawea

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Belynda Love

on 30 September 2014

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Transcript of Million Dollar Sacagawea

• Frazier, Neta Lohnes. Sacajawea: The Girl Nobody Knows. New York: D. McKay, 1967. Print.
As a primary source this books offers Lewis and Clark's actual journal entries as well that support the noted good deeds that Sacagawea offered.

This book gives a perspective as a secondary source that fills in the voids that the journal entries have telling of the important contributions that Sacagawea offered that aren't mentioned in the journal entries in Lewis and Clark's journals.
• Thwaites, Reuben Gold, ed. Original Journals of the Lewis & Clark Expedition, Volume 2. North Scituate, MA, USA: Digital Scanning, Inc., 2001. ProQuest ebrary. Web. 11 September 2014.
This source offers exerts from Lewis and Clark's journals that would go weeks at a time without mentioning Sacagawea, the Indian girl, as even being a part of the exploration. This falsely hinted at Sacagawea being unimportant or just forgot to mention the true importance that came from Sacagawea's choice of actions.
Reflection
Two Destinies Combine
In October 1804 Lewis and Clark chose a place 3 mile below the Mandan Indians where they set up Fort Mandan to camp for the winter and Indians would come to visit.

On
November 11, 1804
, 2 Indian wives of Charbonneau visited the camp, one being Sacagawea.


Louisiana Purchase
President Thomas Jefferson purchased The Louisiana Territory from Napoleon after the Seven Years War, almost doubling the size on the United States.

Jefferson wanted to explore the territory to study the area's plants, animal life, and geography and to figure out how to make money off the land, hoping that trade relation could be made with western Indians.

Jefferson also wanted to find a water route to the Pacific.

Looking Like a Million Sacagaweas
A Helping Hand
Lewis and Clark needed horses to carry belongings over the mountains and heard that the Shoshones could provide them with what they needed.

Needed as translators, Charbonneau, Sagagawea, and Pomp joined the expedition west on
April 7, 1805
I learned that Sacagawea truely wasn't the great guide that I knew her as before i started this project.

Sacagawea still contributed greatly toward the Lewis and Clark expedition and the most pivotal point of her journey to me was when she decided to go against her own tribe to protect Lewis and Clark.
• Foner, Eric. "Chapter 8: Securing the Republic." Give Me Liberty!: An American History. 4th ed. Vol. 1. N.p.: W. W. Norton, 2013. 304-07. Print.
Traveling Buddies
Thomas Jefferson asked Meriwether Lewis to be his private secretary and lead this expedition.

As instructed, Lewis chose a traveling companion, Lieutenant William Clark who had expertise in sketching and making maps.
• Clark, Ella E., and Margot Edmonds. Sacagawea of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Berkeley, CA: U of California, 1979. Print.
The Little Bundle of Boinaiv
Sacagawea, or Sacajawea, was born 1789 with the name Bonaiv (Grass Woman) to the Shoshone Indian tribe.
Shoshones or "Shakes" were horse Indians who were nomadic and had a homeland along area were Idaho and Montana meet.

At the age of 10 or 11 Bonaiv was kidnapped by Minnetaree Warriors on horses and was held captive, where she became Sacagawea.
A New Life
Sacagawea became the wife of Toussant Charbonneau, a French Canadian Interpreter, who Sacagawea married after a man bought her from her father.

On February 11, 1805 Sacagawea gave birth to her son Jean Baptiste nicknamed "Pomp" (meaning leader), but not before her destiny changed.

The Journey Begins
On
May 14, 1804
Lewis and Clark Expedition began its struggle up the Missouri River with 3 boats, 2 captains, and 43 other men.
• Clark, Ella E., and Margot Edmonds. Sacagawea of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Berkeley, CA: U of California, 1979. Print.
• Clark, Ella E., and Margot Edmonds. Sacagawea of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Berkeley, CA: U of California, 1979. Print.
• Frazier, Neta Lohnes. Sacajawea: The Girl Nobody Knows. New York: D. McKay, 1967. Print.
• Clark, Ella E., and Margot Edmonds. Sacagawea of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Berkeley, CA: U of California, 1979. Print.
The Misconception
Sacagawea is thought by many (including myself) to be the great guide of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, but in actuality the Missouri River was the guide

Along the journey Sacagawea recognized land marks but didn't actually know or give any direction on the journey.


But...
Make no mistake...
Sacagawea still made great contributions toward the success of the Lewis and Clark Expedition .
• Clark, Ella E., and Margot Edmonds. Sacagawea of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Berkeley, CA: U of California, 1979. Print.
Woman Power, The True Contrabutions
Beside being an interpretor of business between the Shakes and Lewis and Clark Sacagawea collected
edible roots,
cargo that went overboard the ship,
gathered service berries,
helped make clothes from deer skin,
made oil from elk bone,
walked the shores with Clark down the Jefferson River,
went against her tribe for Lewis and Clark's benefit,
taught Lewis tribe tradition of painting as a symbol of peace to Shoshone tribe,
noticed another tribes clothing as not here own,
and offered survival tactics to Lewis and Clark and other men along the journey west.

You Got The Point, She Still Offered Great Services on the Expedition
• Clark, Ella E., and Margot Edmonds. Sacagawea of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Berkeley, CA: U of California, 1979. Print.
• Frazier, Neta Lohnes. Sacajawea: The Girl Nobody Knows. New York: D. McKay, 1967. Print.
• Foner, Eric. "Chapter 8: Securing the Republic." Give Me Liberty!: An American History. 4th ed. Vol. 1. N.p.: W. W. Norton, 2013. 304-07. Print.
• Clark, Ella E., and Margot Edmonds. Sacagawea of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Berkeley, CA: U of California, 1979. Print.
• Frazier, Neta Lohnes. Sacajawea: The Girl Nobody Knows. New York: D. McKay, 1967. Print.
Eric Foner is an American Historian who is a member of the Department of History at Columbia University. Foner has received numerous awards from the Scholar of the Year by the New York Council for the Humanities in 1995 to the Presidential Award for Outstanding Teaching from Columbia University and the Kidger Award for Excellence in Teaching and Scholarship from the New England History Teachers Association in 2006, and many others. Eric Foner is best known for his books Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party Before the Civil War, Tom Paine and Revolutionary America, Nothing But Freedom: Emancipation and Its Legacy, Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution Give Me Liberty! An American History and a companion book Voices of Freedom just to name a few.
Neta Lohnes Frazier was a teacher at Waitsburg High School and an American children’s author, famous for her books on the Pacific Northwest, who received four Junior Literary Guild awards. In 1978 she received Woman in Communications’ first “Award of Excellence” for being an author for 50 years. Frazier has also written The Stout-Hearted Seven: Orphaned on the Oregon Trail, Path to the Pacific: The Story of Sacagawea, and The Magic Ring.
Ella E. Clark is a retired professor who retains her honorable title that was held before she retired making her Professor Emeritus of English Washington State University. Clark has also written Indian Legends of the Pacific Northwest, Indian Legends from the Northern Rockies and other articles on Western Folklore. She was a fire lookout for the United States Forest Service in the Cascade Mountains where she heard her first Indian myths. Margot Edmonds is a writer and editor who have also written Voices of the Winds Native American Legends, and Legendes Indieness.
Works Cited
Primary
• Thwaites, Reuben Gold, ed. Original Journals of the Lewis & Clark Expedition, Volume 2. North Scituate, MA, USA: Digital Scanning, Inc., 2001. ProQuest ebrary. Web. 11 September 2014.

• Frazier, Neta Lohnes. Sacajawea: The Girl Nobody Knows. New York: D. McKay, 1967. Print.
Secondary
• Clark, Ella E., and Margot Edmonds. Sacagawea of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Berkeley, CA: U of California, 1979. Print.

• Frazier, Neta Lohnes. Sacajawea: The Girl Nobody Knows. New York: D. McKay, 1967. Print.

• Foner, Eric. "Chapter 8: Securing the Republic." Give Me Liberty!: An American History. 4th ed. Vol. 1. N.p.: W. W. Norton, 2013. 304-07. Print.

"2013 Sacagawea Dollar." Sacagawea Dollars. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Sept. 2014.

Lewis and Clark Reflection
Wednesday May 29
[Lewis] the Indian woman with us examined the mockersons,and informed us they were not her nation, the Shake indians.
Sunday August 25
[Lewis] Charbono mentioned to me with apparent unconcern...he expected to meet all the Indians from camp...tomorrow. allarmed at this infomation i asked why he expected to meet them...the 1st chief...requesting indians to meet with him tomorrow...consequently leave me and my baggage on the mountain...
What!
Sacagawea served as a bridge between the Shoshone tribe and Lewis and Clark because the chief in which she was translating business deals ended up to be her brother.

Sacagawea made a really tough decision In telling her husband "Charbono" about the intentions of her tribe to meet and go hunting for food and abandon Lewis and Clark, though she knew her tribe was very hungry.
Thanks for watching
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