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Sonnet 71

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Morgan Garrett

on 7 December 2012

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Transcript of Sonnet 71

By: William Shakespeare Sonnet 71 Sonnet 71 No longer mourn for me when I am dead
Then you shall hear the surly sullen bell
Give warning to the world that I am fled
From this vile world, with vilest worms to dwell:
Nay, if you read this line, remember not
The hand that writ it; for I love you so
That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot
If thinking on me then should make you woe.
O, if, I say, you look upon this verse
When I perhaps compounded am with clay,
Do not so much as my poor name rehearse.
But let your love even with my life decay,
Lest the wise world should look into your moan
And mock you with me after I am gone. Meter The meter of this sonnet is Iambic Pentameter. The reason for this is because it has five stressed syllables and five unstressed syllables.
Example:
/ U / U / U / U / U
No longer mourn for me when I am dead Form This Shakespearean poem is in sonnet form. The
reason for this is because it is a fourteen lined poem
that has one stanza. It contains three quatrains
(four lines) and a couplet ( two lines). Rhyme Scheme a No longer mourn for me when I am dead
b Then you shall hear the surly sullen bell
a Give warning to the world that I am fled
b From this vile world, with vilest worms to dwell:
c Nay, if you read this line, remember not
d The hand that writ it; for I love you so
c That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot
d If thinking on me then should make you woe.
e O, if, I say, you look upon this verse
f When I perhaps compounded am with clay,
e Do not so much as my poor name rehearse.
f But let your love even with my life decay,
g Lest the wise world should look into your moan
g And mock you with me after I am gone. Literary Elements Then you shall hear the surly sullen bell
Personification is of the bell it says that the bell isn't willing to talk.
Give warning to the world that I am fled
Hyperbole is warning the world because it is an exaggeration of how many people are actually being warned.
When I perhaps compounded am with clay
Metaphor is him comparing himself to the composition of clay. Deeper Meaning The deeper meaning of this poem is that if one dwells on the dead then the world will seem evil and their life will be depressing. Just because someone is gone does not mean that the love one had for them is gone. The body is gone but the soul and spirit of the person is still present. By: Nayla Swanson
and Morgan Garrett
Full transcript