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Twitter, Facebook, & Pinterest, Oh My!

Originally created for a Middle School Tech PD for the teachers in the Diocese of Covington.
by

Shannon Bosley

on 5 March 2015

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Transcript of Twitter, Facebook, & Pinterest, Oh My!

Understanding and Using Social Media
Twitter, Facebook, & Pinterest, Oh My!
What is social media?


http://www.commoncraft.com/videolist?qt-cc_video_quicktab=1#qt-cc_video_quicktab
Why so Popular??
How can educators use it?
How can students use it?




5. Then pick just one new social media resource to use for a student project.
Where to start???
The Power of Social Media
Professional learning
Networking
Distance learning
Research
Classroom Management
Public Relations
Communications

2. Follow me. See who I follow. @litchick_ky
Or follow someone else, I will not be offended.
1. Set up a Twitter account.

3. When you see and article you find interesting, a blog you often read, and author of a book you like, etc., search for the author on Twitter.

4. Start learning, start reading, start sharing.
https://todaysmeet.com/ChristianCountyPD

open for one month
http://mashable.com/2014/03/04/oscars-by-the-numbers-ellen/
http://www.danah.org/itscomplicated/
Pew Research Internet Study:
Sept 2012
95% of teens ages 12-17 are online


Brain Research:
Frontal lobe not completely connected/developed until mid-20's
(http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=124119468)
Full transcript