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Copy of Shaking for Suds: Which Type of Water is the Hardest?

Chemistry Project
by

hailey hampton

on 5 December 2013

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Transcript of Copy of Shaking for Suds: Which Type of Water is the Hardest?

Shaking For Suds: Which Type of Water is the Hardest?
What does Hardness in water mean?
When you say hardness it doesn't necessarily mean literally how hard water is.
Hardness is determining how many minerals water contains.
The more minerals the harder the water
Why determine the hardness of water?
Soft water keeps cloths bright and doesn't cause them to fade fast.
Soft water makes your hair shiny.
Hard water deposits can build up over time and cause a film in showers.
In hard water it is more difficult to produce soap suds causing cleaning to be more challenging.
Knowing if you water is hard or soft can be helpful.
Experiment Procedure:
This experiment required me to use three different types of water. I measured out the distilled water, bottled mineral water, and tap water equally into three bottles.
Next I took liquid soap and added a single drop to one of the bottles and shook the bottle five times. If the bubbles hadn't reached the second mark, I then added another drop of soap and shook the bottle again five times. I did this to each type of water until the bubbles reached the second mark.
After the bubbles reached the second mark I would record my data and wash the bottles out. I did this for each water three times.
Results:
Trial One:
Distilled Water: Nine Drops
Bottled Mineral Water: Eight Drops
Tap Water: Six Drops
Trial Two:
Distilled Water: Ten Drops
Bottled Mineral Water: Eight Drops
Tap Water: Seven Drops
Trial Three:
Distilled Water: Eight Drops
Bottled Mineral Water: Nine Drops
Tap Water: Eight Drops
Hypothesis:
Tap water will be the hardest water of the three and take the least amount of soap.
Conclusion:
The harder the water the more soap needed. Knowing this I can conclude from my experiment that distilled water was the hardest water because it required the most amount of soap.
The End
Materials and Equipment

Distilled water (1 gallon)
Bottled mineral water (1 gallon), sometimes called "spring water"; not the carbonated kind
Tap water (1 gallon)
Eye dropper; available at drug stores
Liquid dishwashing soap (1 bottle)
The kind for washing dishes by hand; not the kind for dishwashers
If possible, get regular liquid dishwashing soap; not the "concentrated" kind
Shaking jars, cups, or bottles with lids (3)
Should be equally sized and equally shaped
Any size is a possible option, but smaller sizes (like less than 2 cups) are easier to hold and shake.
Can be glass or clear plastic, though plastic does not have the risk of breakage.
If you use glass jars, then you will also need safety goggles.
If your jars do not have measurement marks on the side of your jars, you will also need:
A permanent marker
A ruler
Lab notebook
If your jars have measurement marks on the side, then you do not need to make any level marks on your jars with a marker. Instead, identify two measurement marks on your jars:
Find one measurement mark that is about one-third of the way up the jar. Write down which measurement mark you chose in your lab notebook. This will be the measurement mark you use to fill up the jar with water.
Find a second measurement mark that is close to the lid of the jar. Write down the measurement mark that you found in your lab notebook. This will be the measurement mark you use to measure the height of the bubbles.
Label the jars with the marker:
You can write down 1, 2, or 3, or write the name of each water type on a different jar, so that you can keep track of which type of water is inside each jar.
You can now go on to the next section, Preparing to Test.
If your jars do not have measurement marks on the side, you will make some measurement marks using a ruler and a marker, so that you can compare the height of the bubbles in each jar.
Using the marker, make a mark on a jar about one-third of the way up the side of the jar.
Set the jar on a table and measure the distance from the table to the mark and write your measurement in your lab notebook.
Using the measurement you wrote down and a ruler, mark the other two jars at the same height. This will be the mark you use to fill your jars with water.
Now make a mark on a jar just a bit below the lid.
Set the jar on the table and again measure the distance from the table to the mark below the lid. Write your measurement in your lab notebook.
Using this second measurement and a ruler, mark the other two jars at the same height. This will be the mark you use to measure the final height of the bubbles in the shaking jar.
Label the jars with the marker.
You can write down 1, 2, or 3, or write the name of each water type on a different jar, so that you can keep track of which type of water is inside each jar.
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