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A View From The Bridge

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Patricia Dawes

on 7 March 2012

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Transcript of A View From The Bridge

A View From The Bridge
By Arthur Miller Context Characters Themes and Ideas Structure Language and Style Arthur Miller was born to a jewish family in New York.
His grandparents migrated from Poland.
He actually worked in the brooklyn shipyards, where he befriended italian workers.
During the McCarthy period, he was asked to name communists, but he chose to stay silent and not name names. Plot The Carbone family are american with italian descent that live in Red Hook, Brooklyn.
They are a poor, but happy family.
When Beatrice's cousins, illegaly arrive to stay , the Carbone's life change forever.
Love and loyalty are put to the test,with tragic results. Eddie Carbone:
Eddie is 40 years old, described as a "husky, slightly overwheight longshoreman."
Master of the house.
Self-protective and selfish.
Does not trust people. "The less you trust, the less you be sorry."
Protective of Catherine which then turns into obsession. Will do anything to prevent her marriage with Rodolpho.
In the end he looses everything. Beatrice Carbone:
Loving and caring.
Lets Eddie control things at home.
Aware of Eddie's feelings towards their niece, and their marital problems. "When am i gonna be a wife again Eddie?"
Supports and encourages Catherine to become indepent.
Finally directly confronts Eddie. "You want somethin' else Eddie, and you can never have her!"
Decides to stay loyal to Eddie in the end, and does not attend Catherine's wedding. Catherine:
Orphaned niece of Beatrice's sister.
Attractive, energetic and cheerful, but naive. She had no idea that something was wrong about the relationship he had with Eddie.
She suffers because Eddie does not approve of Rodolpho, but is prepared to take sides.
He stays loyal to Rodolpho and marries him anyway.
Matures and becomes indepent during the play, but blames herself for Eddie's death.
"Eddie, i never meant to do nothing bad to you." Marco:
Loves his family.
Straightforward, uncomplicated character.
Physically very strong, described as a "regular bull."
Protective of his brother Rodolpho.
Honour is imporant to him , he is prepared to take the law in his own hands. Rodolpho:
Polite, even when Eddie is rude.
Sensitive and ver talented. Cooks, sews, sings. This bother "manly" Eddie.
Unlike Marco, he wants to stay in America.
Falls in love with Catherine, and she with him.
Tries to mediate between Marco and Eddie. Does not want them fighting. Alfieri:
Lawyer
Commentator of the events taking place.He is "the view from the bridge."
He is like the chorus of a Greek tragedy.
Tries to prevent the events from meeting its fatal end.
Warns Marco that "only God makes justice."
He knows that they both will still abide by their own code on honour despite what he says to them. He knows he is powerless to change this inevitable situation. Love Justice & Law Honour American Dream Old World v/s New world Greek Tragedy
Eddie: Epic character- controls the drama (the atmosphere resembles his mood)
Alfieri: chorus (essential to structure)
Modern tragedy
Action occurs in one setting
Tragedy occured to an ordinary person in domestic surroundings. Colloquial language ->"walkin' wavy"
Each character speaks in a different manner. They way they speak can tell us how they are.
Miller uses this to emphasize the difference between the characters, and the different worlds they come from.
Alfieri:
Educated, controlled dialogue.
Uses pronoun "you".
Eddie:
Dialogue is a contrast to Alfieri's.
Uses incomplete, simple sentences -> "lemme see that".
Brooklyn slang
Marco:
Does not speak so much, quiet personality.
Man of actions, rather than words.
Rodolpho:
Though limited in english, he speaks eloquently and with unnatural exactness.
Uses metaphors and vivid language, like when comparing Catherine to a little bird.
Represents Rodolpho's artistic and talented personality. Eddie: "...I'm tellin' you you're walkin' wavy" Eddie: "He's spendin'. Records he buys now. Shoes. Jackets. Eddie: "...I seen greenhorns sometimes get in trouble that way." Eddie: "...till he came here she was never out on the street twelve o'clock at night." (Control) Alfieri: "Now we settle for half, and I like it better. I no longer keep a pistol in my filing cabinet." Rodolpho: "I want to be an American so I can work, this the only wonder here - work! Rodolpho: "And tell him also, and tell yourself, please, that I am not a beggar, and you are not a horse, a gift, a favour for a poor immigrant." Catherine: "Then why don't she be a woman? If I was a wife I would make a man happy..." Marco: "The law? All the law is not in a book." Eddie: "Wipin' the neighbourhood with my name like a dirty rag! I want my name, Marco. Beatrice: "It's wonderful for a whole family to love each other, but you're a grown woman and you're in the same house with a grown man." Alfieri: "The law is only a word for what has a right to happen." Catherine:"I love you, Rodolpho, I love you."
Rodolpho: "Then why are you afraid?" Alfieri: "We all love somebody, the wife, the kids...But sometimes...there's too much. You know? There's too much and it goes where it musn't." Rodolpho: "I want go back to Italy when I am rich, and I will buy a motorcycle." Eddie: "Them guys don't think of nobody but theirself! You marry him and the next time you see him it'll be for divorce!"
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