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Such holidays honoring “spirits of the dead” as if they were

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Avery Jones

on 2 October 2015

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Transcript of Such holidays honoring “spirits of the dead” as if they were

JW.ORG
Celebrations That Displease God
celebration by Satanists and witches:
ORGINS
The next most “holy” days on the Satanists’ calendar are Walpurgis Night and Halloween. Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary defines the former as “the eve of May Day on which witches are held to ride to an appointed rendezvous.”
15 Known for its witches, goblins, and other grotesque decorations and paraphernalia, Halloween—also called All Hallows’ Eve or the eve of All Saints’ Day—can be traced back to the ancient Celts of Britain and Ireland. On the full moon nearest November 1, they celebrated the festival of Samhain, meaning “Summer’s End.” They believed that during Samhain, the veil between the human and the supernatural worlds was parted and that spirits, both good and evil, roamed the earth. The souls of the dead were thought to return to their homes, and families would put out food and drink for their ghostly visitors in hopes of appeasing them. Thus, when children today, dressed as ghosts or witches, go from house to house threatening a mischievous trick unless they receive a treat, they unwittingly perpetuate the rituals of Samhain.
$1.25
Monday, February 17, 2014
Vol XCIII, No. 311
Bible view:
HALLOWEEN
WHERE DID IT COME FROM?
Headline 5
Such holidays honoring “spirits of the dead” as if they were alive in another realm are contrary to the Bible’s description of death as a state of complete unconsciousness.

Celebrations like Halloween are in conflict with Bible teachings. The Bible warns: “There must never be anyone among you who . . . practices divination, who is soothsayer, augur or sorcerer, who uses charms, consults ghosts or spirits, or calls up the dead.”—Deuteronomy 18:10, 11, The Jerusalem Bible; see also Leviticus 19:31; Galatians 5:19-21.

WHERE DID IT COME FROM?


The Origin of Some Halloween Customs and Symbols

VAMPIRES, WEREWOLVES, WITCHES, ZOMBIES: These creatures have long been associated with the evil spirit world.

CANDY: The ancient Celts tried to appease wicked spirits with sweets. The church later encouraged celebrants to go from house to house on All Hallows’ Eve, asking for food in return for a prayer for the dead. This custom eventually became Halloween’s trick or treat.

COSTUMES: The Celts wore frightening masks so that evil spirits would mistakenly think the wearers were spirits and would leave them alone. The church gradually amalgamated pagan customs with the feasts of All Souls and All Saints. Later, celebrants went from house to house wearing costumes of saints, angels, and devils.

PUMPKINS: Carved, candlelit turnips were displayed to repel evil spirits. To some, the candle in the turnip represented a soul trapped in purgatory. Later, carved pumpkins were more commonly used.
SEVENTH CENTURY C.E.

Pope Boniface IV is said to have established the annual celebration of All Saints’ Day to honor martyrs.*

ELEVENTH CENTURY C.E.

The second of November is designated as All Souls’ Day to commemorate the dead. Observances surrounding All Saints’ Day and All Souls’ Day are collectively called Hallowtide.

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY C.E.

The name of the holiday, Hallowe’en (Hallow Evening) appears in print as Halloween.


NEWSPAPER HEADLINE
Thousands of Wiccans, who follow ancient Celtic rituals, still call Halloween by the ancient name Samhain and consider it to be the most sacred night of the year. “Christians ‘don’t realize it, but they’re celebrating our holiday with us. . . . We like it,’” stated the newspaper USA Today when quoting a professed witch.
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