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Romeo and Juliet - Act 1 Scene 5

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Juliet Sun

on 24 October 2013

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Transcript of Romeo and Juliet - Act 1 Scene 5

Romeo & Juliet - Act 1 Scene 5
Scene Summary
This scene takes place at the Capulet ball. Servants are bustling about and Lord Capulet is entertaining his guests.

Key events in this scene include:
Romeo gate crashes the party
Capulet stops Tybalt from fighting with Romeo
Romeo sees Juliet and they fall in love
The Nurse reveals the identities of the lovers to each other
Key Themes & Characters
Love - Romeo meets Juliet
Control and Power - Capulet and Tybalt argue about what to do with Romeo
Death - forshadowing of the play's end
Hate - Tybalt's hate for Romeo as a Montague
Fate/Destiny - the Nurse reveals their identities
Romeo meets Juliet
'Am I the master here, or you?' - Lord Capulet, line 76. Lord Capulet is becoming increasingly angry at Tybalt's intention to pick a fight with Romeo. He is asking if Tybalt is questioning his authority.
By: Ayman, Juliet and Jiya
Capulet - Control and Power - shows his power as the head of the house when he stops Tybalt from attacking Romeo
Romeo - Love - when he sees Juliet he expresses his love for her in the form of a sonnet
Nurse - Fate/Destiny - reveals the identity of the young lovers to each other
Lord Capulet and Tybalt
''Tis he, that villian Romeo.' - Tybalt, line 63. Tybalt refers to Romeo as a 'villian' - shows his hate and spite.
‘O she doth teach the torches to burn bright!’ - Romeo, line 43. Uses light imagery and hyperbole - Romeo says she shines brighter than a torch.
‘...snowy dove trooping with crows’ - Romeo, line 47. Uses contrasting imagery, compares white against black. White dove also shows her innocence and purity.
‘Did my heart love till now? forswear it, sight!’ - Romeo, line 51. Romeo discovers true love - contrast to his infatuation with Rosaline.
‘This holy shrine...’ - Romeo, line 93. Comparing Juliet to a saint, use of religious imagery.
‘...mannerly devotion shows in this,/For saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch’ - Juliet, line 97-98. Religious imagery (‘devotion’, ‘saints’ ‘pilgrims’’) Almost as if Romeo worships her.
The Identities are Revealed
‘His name is Romeo, and a Montague,/The only son of your great enemy.’ - Nurse, line 135-136. Revealing of Romeo’s identity. Also introduces a problem for the lovers because they are of opposing families in the feud.
‘My grave is like to be my wedding bed’ - Juliet, line 134. Juliet foreshadows her own death. This line also shows how she is unwilling to marry anyone other than Romeo.
‘My only love sprung from my only hate!’ - Juliet, line 137. Juliet’s one true love is a member of the family that is the enemy of her house. The exclamation mark shows her exasperation.
‘Prodigious birth of love it is to me,/That I must love a loathèd enemy.’ - Juliet, line 139-140. 'Prodigious' means 'ominous' or 'monstrous', showing her misfortune for having fallen in love with her enemy.
‘You are a princox, go,/Be quiet...For shame,/I’ll make you quiet…!’ - Lord Capulet, line 85-87. Lord Capulet is angry and tells Tybalt to calm down. He insults Tybalt by calling him ‘princox’ which means ‘cocky youngster’. Lord Capulet also shows his masculinity when he threatens Tybalt.
‘I will withdraw, but this intrusion shall,/Now seeming sweet, convert to bitt’rest gall’ - Tybalt, line 90-91. Tybalt is not happy with backing down. He is still angry at Romeo's 'intrusion' and also implies that things will take a turn for the worse in the future.
Thank You For Listening
Full transcript