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Igbo Culture: Music

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Essence Mitchell

on 6 March 2014

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Transcript of Igbo Culture: Music

Igbo Culture: Music
Igbo Music:
5 facts about Igbo music:
What instruments are used?
What are some popular genres of Igbo music today?
Similarities and differences between Igbo & Americans
Igbo people actually do not really like Americans.
They believe we are lazy.
We are both very devoted to our cultures.
We both are really like and enjoy sports.
Igbo don't eat certain foods, while we Americans do and eat whatever we want.
Instruments like the pot drum, talking drum (Ekwe), Bong, Oja, Udu, Gong and Okpola is used when making (traditional) Igbo music. They're used for their innate ability to provide a diverse array of Tempo.
How early does Igbo music date back to?
Igbo people are most likely descendants of the people of the Nok culture, which music and themselves date back to 500 B.C. to 200 A.D.
The most popular styles of Igbo music are Highlife, Odumodu and Waka.

Generally very lively, hype and upbeat which creates a variety of sounds that enables the Igbo people to incorporate music into their daily lives.
1. The Igbo culture rely heavily on percussion instruments.
2. Igbo music is used for dance, lullabies, funerals and even labor.
3. The Igbo also have a style of music known as Ikorodo.
4. Igbo music usually remains traditional, but it has recently undergone some changes in the past years.
5.Popular musicians include Sir Warrior (Head of Highlife), Oliver de Coque (King of Highlife) and Chief Stephen Osita Osadebei (Duke of Highlife).
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