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2D Art - Heroes and Heroines: Art as Commemoration

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megan ruckel

on 17 March 2016

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Transcript of 2D Art - Heroes and Heroines: Art as Commemoration

2D Art I Heroes and Heroines: Art as Commemoration
Essential Questions
How do artists represent heroes and heroic events?
What is a hero/heroine?
What characteristics must someone have to be a hero/heroine?
Who are some famous heroes/heroines in the world today?
How do everyday heroes/heroines compare to famous heroes/heroines?
What can they teach you about behaving like a hero/heroine? Could you be a hero?
What is a good citizen? How can you be a good citizen?
What is a superhero/heroine? How are they different from a good citizen?

Defining a Hero/Heroine
What is a hero/heroine?

What does a hero/heroine look like?

What characteristics must someone have to be a hero/heroine?
A Hero/Heroine is someone who: Examples of heroes and heroines:
Make a Chart: What is a Hero/Heroine?
A Hero/Heroine is someone who: Examples of heroes and heroines:
Period 3: What is a Hero/Heroine?
A Hero/Heroine is someone who: Examples of heroes and heroines:
Period 6: What is a Hero/Heroine?
Other Important Vocabulary
Monument
- A structure, such as a building or sculpture, built as a memorial

Memorial
- Something, such as a monument or holiday, intended to celebrate or honor the memory of a person or an event.

Commemorate
- to serve as a memorial or reminder
The Pelican Portrait of
Queen Elizabeth I of England

Attributed to Nicholas Hilliard
c. 1575-1580
Oil on panel
Napoleon Crossing the Alps

By Jacques Louis-David
c. 1801
Oil on canvas
Washington Crossing the Delaware
By Emanuel Leutze, c. 1851, Oil on canvas
Joan of Arc

By Emmanuel Frémiet
c. 1874-1899
Gilded Bronze
Equestrian Statue of
Simón Bolívar

By Felix de Weldon
1959
Bronze
From the book, Harriet and the Promised Land
By Jacob Lawrence, 1996, mixed media
Cesar Chavez Mural, By Ignacio Gomez and contributors, 2004
The Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
Sculpture by Lei Yixin, 2011, granite
The Nelson Mandela Monument

By Marco Cianfanelli, 2012, steel and concrete
Rosa Parks U.S. (Forever) Stamp

Painting by Thomas Blackshear II, Issued 2013
Historical/Cultural Context
Heroes and heroines have inspired artists from many different cultures throughout history.
In the past, artists have created paintings, sculptures, monuments, murals, mosaics, photographs, and memorials to remember important historical figures and role models.
An artwork may be considered heroic due to its intent, scale, and/or emotion.
Different types of heroic art include community art, humanistic art, political art, portraiture, environmental art, and inspirational art.
Heroic art may portray the following types of heroes/heroines: personal, community, global, environmental, political, religious, women, artists, scientists, sports, superheroes, literary, and film.

Commemorative Art Today
Today, artists are finding new methods and media for commemorating important figures from various cultures and time periods.

Artists have created movies, television shows, comic books, and websites to remember their favorite heroes and heroines.
Google Doodles
One of the most recent types of commemorative art is the Google Doodle.
Google Doodles are the fun, surprising, and sometimes spontaneous changes that are made to the Google logo to celebrate holidays, anniversaries, and the lives of famous artists, pioneers, and scientists.
Since the year 2000, the Google team of illustrators (doodlers) and engineers have created over 1,000 doodles for the Google homepage.
Ideas come from both Google employees and Google users.
The doodle selection process aims to celebrate interesting events and anniversaries that reflect Google's personality and love for innovation.

Unit Overview
In this unit you will study commemorative art depicting
heroes and heroines from a variety of cultures and time
periods.
You will identify the life forming values that
heroes possess in order to accomplish extraordinary things.
Making hero art can be inspirational, and can demonstrate the humanity and compassion that is necessary to create cooperation and mutual respect.
The three projects will allow you to determine the characteristics of a hero /heroine, and use that knowledge to help you display those characteristics in your own actions and personal conduct.
This unit will allow you to explore the concept of heroism in three different ways. You will:
select and commemorate a famous hero/heroine,
identify and commemorate an everyday hero/heroine of personal significance, and
create your own Real Life Superhero/heroine costume based on your heroic characteristics.
Unit Goals
By participating in this unit, you will:
Examine how artists have depicted heroes and heroines from a variety of cultures and time periods
Understand and define the terms ‘hero’ and ‘heroine’
Compare famous heroes and heroines, everyday heroes, superheroes, and good citizens
Create two original works of art portraying personal heroes and heroines, and an original Real Life Superhero/heroine costume

October 29, 2012
Bob Ross' 70th Birthday

For more than a decade, Bob Ross’
The Joy of Painting
welcomed viewers into his minimalist tv studio for inspiration and painting tips.

Cesar Chavez’s 86th Birthday (3/31/13)

American farm worker, labor leader and Latino American civil rights activist, who, with Dolores Huerta, co-founded the National Farm Workers Association
Adalbert Czerny’s 150th Birthday (3/25/13)

Austrian pediatrician and is considered co-founder of modern pediatrics. Several children's diseases were named after him.
Vladimir Vernadsky’s 150th Birthday (3/12/13)

Ukrainian and Soviet mineralogist and geochemist who is considered one of the founders of geochemistry, biogeochemistry, and of radiogeology.
Miriam Makeba’s 81st Birthday (3/4/13)

Nicknamed Mama Africa, was a Grammy Award-winning South African singer and civil rights activist. In the 1960s, she was the first artist from Africa to popularize African music around the world.
Manuel Alvarez Bravo’s 111st Birthday (2/4/13)

Mexico’s first principal artistic photographer and is the most important figure in 20th-century Latin American photography
Nicolaus Copernicus’ 540th Birthday
Animated Google Doodle
Renaissance mathematician and astronomer who formulated a heliocentric model of the universe which placed the Sun, rather than the Earth, at the center


http://www.google.com/doodles/nicolaus-copernicus-540th-birthday

3/2/2009 Dr. Seuss' 105th Birthday
http://www.google.com/doodles/finder/2013/All%20doodles
Heroic Google Doodle Activity
Before you begin your project......

In your sketchbook, answer the following questions for 10 points:
1. What is a hero/heroine? (3 points)

2. How do artists portray heroes/heroines? (3 points)

3. Who are some of your favorite FAMOUS heroes/heroines? (List 3-5) (2 points)

4. Choose 1 of these FAMOUS heroes to focus on for your Google Doodle Project: ________________________ (2 points)
Google Doodle Project
Famous Heroes:

Everyday Heroes:

Personal Heroes:

Superheroes:
Famous Heroes:

Everyday Heroes:

Personal Heroes:

Superheroes:
Famous Heroes:

Everyday Heroes:

Personal Heroes:

Superheroes:
Heroic Google Doodle Example: Georgia O'Keeffe
Everyday Papier-Mâché Hero
In your sketchbook, write down your Learning Goals for this project:

Recognize an everyday hero, and know the difference between a hero/heroine and an idol
Use papier-mâché to create an original commemorative statue of an everyday hero of personal significance
Through written response, reflect upon and explain your aesthetic decisions
BAV Vocabulary
Idol: someone who is adored blindly and excessively

Papier-Mâché: A material, made from paper pulp or shreds of paper mixed with glue, that can be molded into various shapes when wet, and becomes hard and suitable for painting when dry

Armature: A framework serving as a supporting core for the material that is used to make a sculpture
Hero vs. Idol
Examples
Examples
Papier-Mâché
Picasso and Flamenco Dancer, Artist Unknown, outside shop in Barcelona, Spain, 2007.
Carnival float depicting President Barack Obama, Rose Monday Parade, Dusseldorf, Germany, 2009
Mask of Nichi Vendola, made for the Carnival of Massafra, 2007.
The Three Stooges by Betty Gardner, 2005
Nancy Winn, Magoo
Nancy Winn, Knickernotch
The Paranoiacs by Ellen Carlier, 2009
Dan Reeder
Armature: a framework or supporting core around which the sculpture is built
Can be made of wire, wood, or in our case newspaper and tape
Everyday Papier-Mâché Hero Project
You will create a papier-mâché sculpture of one of your personal everyday heroes
Must be someone you personally know (family member, coach, teacher, mentor, etc.)
May be alive or deceased

Questions to consider:
Who are some of your everyday heroes?
What makes this person/animal a hero?
How will you sculpt your hero?
What does he/she look like?
What type of clothing will he/she be wearing?
Making an Armature
To begin, crumple one sheet of newspaper into a ball for the head.
Grab another sheet of newspaper, and place the ball in the center of a spread, turn over and twist the newspaper around the ball to form a head. Tape around the neck.
Use another spread and scrunch it long-ways. Place inside the other spread tight to the head, this will become the arms.
Tape around the upper body, forming the shoulders and waist. Tape around the head and arms. Scrunch another spread long-ways for the legs. Once again, place inside the torso spread, and tape legs to the rest of the body.
Start to tape the rest of the figure, adding crumpled newspaper for extra volume where needed (belly, nose, eyebrows, lips, heels, shoulders, etc), and taping over the added mass. Cover the entire figure in tape to smooth out the form.
Write your name and period somewhere on your armature
Everyday Papier-Mâché Hero Activity
In your sketchbook, answer the following questions using complete sentences:

1. List at least three types of everyday heroes/heroines:

2. How is a hero/heroine different from an idol?

3. Who are some of your everyday heroes/heroines? (Name at least two)
Everyday Papier-Mâché Hero Project
Once your armature is complete, sketch your ideas for completing your papier-mâché hero
What will he/she look like?
What type of clothing will he/she be wearing
What other accessories could you add? (glasses, hat, shoes, props, etc.)
Next, cover your armature in papier-mâché (strips of newspaper dipped in glue mixture)
Once your papier-mâché sculpture is dry, you should begin decorating it
You can use paint, fabric, colored paper, and any other materials in the classroom
When your sculpture is complete, we will attach it to a cardboard base, which you will also decorate
Everyday Papier-Mâché Hero Project
You will discuss your completed sculptures in small groups
First, have your group guess who your hero/heroine is
Why do you consider this person/animal an everyday hero?
How do the sculpture's physical features and clothing/decoration give us clues about your everyday hero/heroine?
What materials did you use to decorate your papier-mâché sculpture?
What do you think you did really well? What do you think you could work on if you had more time for this project?

Fill out the Everyday Papier-Mâché Hero Self-Assessment Form
a good citizen
brave, strong, smart, kind,
caring, helpful, courageous
saves the day, helps people
in need, generous, friendly, protects people,
willing to do anything for the greater good, inspiring
Wonderwoman, Batman,
Superman, firefighters, police officers, friends, family, coaches, pets
A famous person/celebrity who is blindly admired because they are known for having lots of money, good looks, or exceptional talent in a specific genre
athletes, movie stars, musicians, artists, tv stars, reality tv characters, gamers
both admired, people look up to them
people want to be like them
both talented
BAV Vocabulary
*Add these terms to your BAV list in your art folder

Superhero/heroine: a fictional character with extraordinary or superhuman powers, who is dedicated to protecting the public

Learning Goals
Students will be able to:
recognize the traits of a good citizen, and learn how to display those qualities in their own actions and personal conduct
create an original Real Life Superhero costume based on their own heroic characteristics and talents
through written response, reflect upon and explain their artistic decisions
http://www.reallifesuperheroes.com/
The Real Life Superhero Project
Who are these Real Life Superheroes?
Our neighbors, friends, family
Artists, musicians, athletes, and politicians
A culture that works in fun, exciting, and inspirational ways to make a difference, inspire others, spread positive messages, and call attention to issues in our communities
There is a hero in everyone, and they aim to bring it out to help make the world a little more super!
The Hero in You Project
Answer these three questions in your sketchbook (10 pts)
Name three characteristics of a good citizen



What characteristics, interests, and/or talents do you have that could help you be a good citizen?


List at least three ways you can make a difference in your community



The Hero in You Project
For this project, you will be creating your own Real Life Superhero alter ego and costume
Ask yourself:
What will my alter ego be?
What will my costume look like?
What will your superhero logo be?
What will your mission/purpose be as a good citizen/real-life superhero?
How will your costume reflect your mission/purpose?
Brainstorm ideas, and develop a sketch for your RLSH costume
Example:
Real Life Superhero Alter Ego: ARTastica
Good Citizen Characteristics: Desire to make her community a more beautiful place through art
Mission/Purpose: To share her love of art with the community, working to inspire, encourage, and heal others
I chose to make a mask, belt, and two wrist cuffs for my RLSH costume
Alter ego: a second self, often different from a person's normal or original personality
Real Life Superhero: normal citizens who have decided to make a difference in their community by helping those in need
Citizenship: your relationship with your community (your behavior and actions within your community)
Altruism: selflessness, concern for the well-being of others
BAV Vocabulary
BAV Vocabulary
BAV Vocabulary
BAV Vocabulary
*** ADD TO PRINCIPLES BOOK ***

The way the artist leads the eye in, around, and through a composition. The path the eye follows, it can set a mood or convey a feeling.

Three Types of Movement:
Kinetic Movement
: actual physical movement
Recorded Action
:
shift eyes to follow action
Compositional Movement
: comparing positions of stationary objects/space within a design
Movement
Dr. Harold Edgerton,
Densmore Shute
, 1938
Photo: a 1/100,000-second strobe flashed every 1/100 second to make this image
Recorded Action
Compositional Movement
Allan Houser,
Desert Dweller
, 1990, Bronze
Vincent van Gogh,
Starry Night
,
1889, oil on canvas
2D Hero
Google Doodle
Elements of Art:
Color & Texture

Principles of
Design:
Movement & Contrast
Heroic Google Doodle Project
Once you decide which famous hero/heroine you're focusing on for this project, work on a sketch for your Google Doodle design
Every letter of the word "Google" should represent something different about your hero
Don't forget the background - come up with an interesting background design that reflects your hero and his/her accomplishments
You may use any combination of paint, marker, crayon, and/or colored pencil for this project - color/paint your sketch!
Really focus on your CRAFTSMANSHIP or NEATNESS while drawing and coloring your sketch!
BELLWORK 3/15/16
What is contrast?
Describe 2 ways of creating contrast in your artwork.
TO PREP YOUR TABLES:
SEAT #1
: Get 1 paint tray from the back counter
SEAT #2:
Get 2 blue bowls of water for your group (back counter)
SEAT #3
: Get a SMALL paintbrush for each person in your group
SEAT #4
: Get an apron for each person in your group
BELLWORK 12/11/15
CLEAN OUT & TAKE HOME YOUR ART PORTFOLIO
THROW AWAY ANY UNWANTED PAPERS/PROJECTS - IN DUMPSTER!!!!
TAKE HOME ANYTHING YOU WOULD LIKE TO KEEP (SKETCHBOOK, FOLDER, ELEMENTS/PRINCIPLES BOOKS, STUDY GUIDE)
IF YOUR PORTFOLIO IS EMPTY & IS STILL INTACT (NO RIPS/TEARS) WE CAN REUSE IT NEXT SEMESTER - LEAVE IT ON THE FLOOR UNDER 1ST PERIOD BOX!
Texture
Texture refers to the tactile qualities of a surface (actual) or to the visual representation of such surface qualities (implied).
COLOR
Color
** ADD TO ELEMENTS BOOK**
Color is produced by the way our vision responds to different wavelengths of light. All colors come from the three primaries (red, yellow, and blue) and black and white.
*NOTES: Color has three properties - hue, value, and intensity.
COLOR
Neutral Colors: white, black, gray, brown
**NOTES:
Color Wheel
In your sketchbook, create a color wheel using ONLY THE 3 PRIMARY COLORS:
RED
,
YELLOW
,
BLUE
WARM COLOR SCHEME: Red, Orange, Yellow
COOL COLOR SCHEME: Green, Blue, Purple
PRIMARY COLOR SCHEME: Red, Yellow, Blue
SECONDARY COLOR SCHEME: Green, Orange, Purple
COMPLEMENTARY COLOR SCHEME: OPPOSITES on the color wheel: Orange/Blue, Red/Green, Yellow/Purple
ANALOGOUS COLOR SCHEME: 3 Neighbors on the Color Wheel (ex: yellow, yellow-green, green)
TO PREP YOUR TABLES FOR PAINTING:
SEAT #1
: Get one EGG CARTON paint tray for your table (back counter)
SEAT #2
: Get a small paintbrush for everyone at your table
SEAT #3
: Get 2 blue bowls of water for your group
SEAT #4
: Get an apron for everyone at your table
Contrast
Creating tension between opposites. Can be the use of several elements of art to hold the viewer's attention and to guide the viewer's eye through the artwork.

LARGE/SMALL DARK/LIGHT
SOFT/HARD BLACK/WHITE
DULL/BRIGHT
Once you finish your sketch for your Google Doodle design, call me over to approve it
You may begin working on your final white paper
DRAW EVERYTHING IN PENCIL FIRST!
Every letter
of the word "Google" should represent something different about your hero
Don't forget the
background
- come up with an interesting background design that reflects your hero and his/her accomplishments
You may use any combination of paint, marker, crayon, and/or colored pencil for this project
Really focus on your
CRAFTSMANSHIP
or
NEATNESS
while drawing and coloring your final!
FIX SELF-ASSESSMENT TO SAY COLOR & TEXTURE (ELEMENTS) AND MOVEMENT & CONTRAST (PRINCIPLES)
Heroic Google Doodle Project
BELLWORK 2/29/16
WHAT GRADE DO YOU THINK YOU'LL EARN FOR YOUR ONE-PONT PERSPECTIVE ROOM PROJECT (OUT OF 100)?
WHY?
BELLWORK 3/2/16
WHAT IS COLOR?
NAME THE 3 PRIMARY COLORS.
BELLWORK 3/3/16
What are the 3 secondary colors?
Name 4 different types of color schemes.
BELLWORK 3/4/16
What is texture?
Name 3 different types of textures.
BELLWORK 3/10/16
What is an Art Critique?
List the 4 steps of an art critique.
BELLWORK 3/11/16
What is movement?
How are you creating movement
in your Hero Google Doodle?
What do you need to accomplish in class today to finish your Hero Google Doodle to the best of your ability?
BELLWORK 3/17/16
Full transcript