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Timeline

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by

Carly Tashjian

on 20 December 2015

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Transcript of Timeline

History of Fashion Timeline
How and Why Humans Dress
Prehistoric- Cave Art
France, Paleolithic
Dated around 25,000 BC, this cave painting in Pech- Merle, France. In prehistoric times, man frequently drew animals and handprints. Here we see spotted horses accompanied with numerous hand stencils.
22,000 B.C
How and Why Humans Dress
How and Why Humans Dress
Dress Motivations
Prehistoric- Stone Age Tool
This is little Carly (myself), with
her father Carl. Little Carly is
dressed in a fur coat. She is also
wearing hair accessories in her hair.
New York, Personal Photograph, Carly Tashjian. 2001.
This is a coat. Coats are used
as a
protection device
. This
coat is an example of a
t-shaped garment.
They are cut
and sewn, also known as tailored.
These hair clips in Carly's hair can be used as
utility
to keep her hair out of her face. They can also be used as
self expression
. This may make her feel unique and instinctively want to advance herself.
How and Why Humans Dress

Dress Motivations
This is big Carly.
She is now wearing a
pink tank-top, gray
cardigan, jean shorts,
and a handbag.
Carly's short shorts could
be considered as a
seduction
motivation. The shorts length
shows off the lower half of the body.
New York, Personal Photograph, Carly Tashjian. 2015.
How and Why Humans Dress
Body Modification
This handbag is used for
utility
purposes. Carly has personal items that she must carry with her when she is out and about.
New York, Personal Photograph by Carly
Tashjian. 2013
Tattoo (permanent ink)
This photograph shows my friend Angelica's tattoo along her ribcage. This tattoo is black and to her black symbolizes grief. She got this tattoo for her grandmother that has passed. She also explained there were other religious beliefs for the reason why she got this tattoo. In the United States, tattoos are often used for
self expression
and individuality.
How and Why Humans Dress
human handprints
Body Art and Color Symbolism
The Padaung women of Myanmar
2012
Modification of the torso could be the breasts, trunk, or neck. The Padaung women were known for stretching their necks. Their neck would elongate to around 15 inches with the use of a coiled brass neck ring. This is a symbol in their culture of wealth, position, and beauty. This
reshaping
is done for religious purposes. The Padaung believe that women used to be angels in the previous world, and male hunters would use their rattan rings to obtain them and bring them to this world.
The Editors of Encylopedia Britannica, "Body Modifications and Mutilations ,
Britannica. accessed September 12, 2015, http://www.britannica.com/science/body-modifications-and-mutilations.
How and Why Humans Dress
Body Art and Color Symbolism
The Surma
The Surma people originate from the
plateaus of southwestern
Ethiopia. On special
occasions, in intricate
patterns they decorate
their bodies with pigment
and chalk. The colors in this picture
seem to be earth tones. The purpose of
decorating their bodies is for
self
expression.
"Body Art: A Means of Self Expression,"
The African Conservancy.
accessed September 14, 2015, http://www.africanconservancy.org/member/bodyart.html.
New York, Personal photograph, Carly Tashjian. 07.April.2015.
Cosmetology
2015
Modern Makeup is a very common use of body art in today's society. Younger people may wear makeup to enhance their features and make them look older, where older people where it to attempt to hide their age. In this photograph, my friend and I are wearing red lipstick. The color
red
could
symbolize sex and seduction
.
We are also wearing eyeliner and mascara to enhance our natural features. Makeup is commonly used for
self expression.
Charles Q. Choi, "Caveman Art: Spotted Horses Likely Real, Not Fantasy," Live Science, November 2011.
Flint burins
This prehistoric tool was used
as early as 12,500 BC for
drawing and for making bone
and antler equipment. These are
from the rockshelter of La Madeleine,
Dordogne, France. Flint is a hard kind of
stone and usually found in gray, brown,
red, green, or black. It has a glassy
appearance. These tools can be held like
a pencil and could have been used to
make jewelery.
Flint burins, 12,500 B.C, The British Museum, London, England.
25,000 B.C
2014
Butterfly Tattoo
2013

How and Why Humans Dress

Body Modifications
t-shaped garmet
2001
2012
2013
2014
2015
2015
Medieval Europe
1200
This South Netherlandish work of art made of wool and silk depicts a group of men attempting to hunt with the help of their dogs.
These men are wearing
tunics
. Their cut and sewn tunics are probably made of
wool
. They are also wearing
cloaks
or
mantles
on top. On bottom, they are wearing stockings called
breeches
. Lastly, around their waists they are wearing
girdles
. Since these men are hunting, these could be used as
utility
for attached pouches or weaponry.
Cloak or Mantle
Breeches
Tunic
Medieval: Group
Girdle (Belt)
Middle Ages
Middle Ages: Accessory
The Unicorn Defends Himself, 1200. The Metropolitan Museum. New York.
675-700
This beautifully detailed
brooch

was most likely worn by a Frankish
woman. This is a gold sheet,
made with inlays of garnet and
glass.These tribes placed high
value on jewelry because it was a
sign of wealth and
status and
hierarchy
. This woman's family
most likely had power because
brooches like these symbolized
power. Not only were these
brooches admired in daily life,
but they also accompanied their
owners after death.
Disk Brooch, 675-700. The Metropolitan Museum. New York
Medieval Europe
Medieval: Statue of a King
1150-60
This French column statue was sculpted from limestone. The French king being depicted here is unknown, but his jeweled crown indicates
status and hierarchy
. Here, there is an integration of a standing figure and a cylindrical column. This style of
architecture
was very popular for this period.
Column Statue of a King, 150-60. The Metropolitan Museum. New York.
Medieval Europe
Gothic Period: Group
1412-1416 AD
The Tres Riches Heures du Duc de
Berry is an illuminated manuscript.
It is lavishly decorated, containing
over 200 folios. There are many
different depictions of daily activities
at the Duke's court. In the manuscript,
not only were the wealthy just depicted,
but also the peasants. In this image, we have the Duke's household exchanging New Year's gifts. The Duke is located on the far right wearing the blue robe. Post-plague, young men began to start revealing a little more of the shape of their bodies for
seduction
. They wore belt like ropes called
belt girdles

that emphasized the groin.
This helped to drop their waistlines. Belt girdles also were used for
utility.
Instead of just showing their bare legs, they wore
hoses
. Hoses resemble present day tights. Like depicted in this painting, sometimes men had a different color on each leg, which was called
parti-colored hosing
. These men also had
hanging sleeves
which represent
status and hierarchy,
because they can afford the extra fabric.
Tippets
, the strips of fabric hanging off the shoulders, show flamboyance and personality. One could say this was for
personal expression.
Tippets
Hanging Sleeves
Belt Girdles
Medieval Europe
Gothic Period: Group
1412-1416 AD
Hose
This is another painting from the Tres Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. In this scene, we have a young couple exchanging rings in April. The women are wearing fancy
gowns
that are very fitted in the torso and drape to the floor. The woman in the back of this painting's
padded headdress
shows no visible hairline. As for men, they wore many different types of
headwear
during the Gothic Period. Two of these men are wearing
poulaines
. These pointy shoes represented
status and hierarchy
because only royal and elite classes really wore these shoes.
Headwear
Padded
Headdress
Gown
The Public Domain Review, "Labors of the Month from the Tres Riches Heures". accessed October 12, 2015. http://publicdomainreview.org/collections/labors-of-the-months-from-the-tres-riches-heures/.
The Public Domain Review, "Labors of the Month from the Tres Riches Heures". accessed October 12, 2015. http://publicdomainreview.org/collections/labors-of-the-months-from-the-tres-riches-heures/.
Italian Renaissance
Italian Renaissance: Female
1491-95
Girl with Cherries, 1491-95. The Metropolitan Museum. New York.
chemise
jewelry
gown
This portrait was painted by someone in Leonardo da Vinci's circle.This young woman shows her
status and hierarchy
by her gown. The red in her gown also shows
status and hierarchy
because red was an expensive dye to produce. Therefore the red signifies she has some status. The low neckline and red both also represent
seduction.
Underneath her gown, she is wearing a
chemise.
Also, take note of the
jewelry
on her neck. Necklaces represented
wealth and power
. In portraits, light red hair on women is often depicted and creates a gentle touch. A common headpiece women wore is called a ferroniere. It is a small chain or beaded headband around the forehead.
ferroniere
Middle Ages
Middle Ages: Group
800 AD
The Andrews Diptych is an Italian
piece made of elephant ivory. The diptych depicts men in clothing for
utility
and
protection
. The common attire for this
period was a
tunic
and usually a
cloak
was worn on top. For accessories,
brooches
were a common item. Brooches symbolized
status
and
hierarchy
because
they were very expensive and only the
wealthy could afford them.
cloak/mantle
brooch
The Public Domain Review, "Labors of the Month from the Tres Riches Heures". accessed October 12, 2015. http://publicdomainreview.org/collections/labors-of-the-months-from-the-tres-riches-heures/.
poulaines
Medieval Europe
Gothic Period: Group
1400
This south Netherlandish piece depicting King Arthur and attendants is made of wool. His
crown
is a clear depiction of
status
and
hierarchy
. These other men are wearing a
cote hardie
, a very short and tight fitted piece of clothing.
cote hardie
675 A.D
800 A.D
1150 A.D
1200 A.D
1400 A.D
1412 A.D
1412 A.D
1570 A.D
1491 A.D
The Renaissance
Italian Renaissance: Female
1455
This oil on panel portait was painted by
Petrus Christus and is titled, "Portrait of a Female Donor". This is a simple and realistic picture of a young woman. Take note of the
light red hair, which was very popular at the time. The
red
gown, signifies she has some
sort of
status and vanity
. Take note of what
is on her head. Women commonly wore headwear duing this time period.


color
chemise
Portrait of a Female Donor, 1455. National Gallery of Art. Washington D.C.
The Renaissance
Italian Renaissance: Female 1470
This portait of a young girl, by Petrus Christus is a good representation of what a young girl with status would dress like. She is wearing a gown, and there is jewlery around her neck. Both symbolize her
status
and
hierarchy
. If you look closely, you can also see her light red hair peeking out. On her head, she is wearing a
baizo
. This was a beehive like hairstyle that created a turban effect.
gown
jewlery
baizo
Portrait of a Young Girl, 1470. National Gallery of Art. Washington D.C.
The Renaissance
Italian Renaissance: Male
1513
This is a painting in oil on panel by the Italian High Renaissance Old Master painter and architect Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino. He is better known as Raphael. Many historians believe this is his self portrait. In this image,
we see him wearing a
chemise
, that is rather revealing.
Long hair
was very popular among men during this time period.
Sable fur
is being used as a coat that he has thrown over his shoulder. This coat could reflect his
personal

identity
and show his
personal

expression
. Or, this ould be used as utility to simply keep him warm. Lastly, if we take a look at his headwear,
he is wearing something known as
flat cap
.
This was a very popular look for Italian Renaissance men. Notice how is very much resembles the later invented beret.
chemise
long hair
coat
flat cap
The Telepgraph, Portrait of a Young Man. accessed October 28, 2015. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/art/art-news/10191072/The-10-most-wanted-missing-paintings.html
The Renaissance
Tudor: Male
1536
This portrait is of King Henry the Eighth. He is wearing a
chemise
that is barely seen below his chin, with an extravegantly patterned
doublet
on top. He has short,
wide puffed sleeves
. Also, take note of his extravagant
flat cap
that rests atop of his head. The intricate patterns on his doublet represent
status and hierarchy
, because he can afford to wear all of these complex patterns. They also could represent
personal

expression
to show off his own personal style. He is also wearing a
chain
with a pendant.
Jewlery
usually represents a person's family or group association.
flat cap
chemise
doublet
slashing and puffing
jewlery
King Henry VIII after Hans Holbein the Younger, 1536. National Portrait Gallery. London, England.
The Renaissance

Tudor: Female
1533-1536
Anne Boleyn, 1533-1536. National Portrait Gallery. London, England.
Anne Boleyn was a queen who reigned only for three years during the Tudor Period. Notice the very
low neckline
, thanks to the
stomacher
. Note how it is now a very straight
horizontal neckline
. that pushes the breasts up. This could have been seen as a means of
seduction
. The
English hood
, also known as a
Gabled
, covers most of her hair. Necklaes dangle around her neck, symbolizing her
wealth
through
status and hierarchy
. These pearls could also symbolize purity and
modesty
.
English hood
stomacher
jewlery
The Renaissance
Elizabethan: Female
1590-1600
Lady Jane Grey, 1590-1600. National Portrait Gallery. London, England.
women's sillouhette.
wheel or French farthingale
stomacher
jewlery
This is a nice example of a court dress during the Elizabethan time. Delicate lace and ruff together are present here.These extravagant patterns show this young woman's status of wealth. Notice how the hair is pulled back, which was very popular during this time period. The wheel or also known as French Farthingale is the underhoop that keep the skirts in the round shape.
hairstyle
ruff
The Renaissance
Elizabethan: Male
1570
The Tailor, 1570. The National Gallery. London, England.
doublet
ruff
pumpkin breeches
Here we see a portrait of a tailor.
This is a nice depiction of male
working class clothing. Here we see
the tailor wearing a
doublet
that is
shaped and fitted to his body type.
Underneath the doublet we see what
was known as a
ruff
. He is also
wearing
pumpkin breeches
These
showed off mens legs and could be
seen as a means of
seduction
. Men
loved showing their legs off during
this period.
The 17th-18th Centuries
Cavalier: Male
Early 17th Century
The 17th-18th Centuries
Cavalier: Female
1645-50
The 17th- 18th Centuries
Restoration/Baroque: Male
The 17th-18th Centuries
Restoration/Baroque: Female
The 17th-18th Centuries
Rococo: Male
1745-55
The 17th-18th Centuries
Rococo: Female
1757
The 17th-18th Centuries
Ancien Regime/ Georgian: Male
The 17th-18th Centuries
Ancien Regime/ Georgian: Female
1788
A Standing Cavalier. Early 17th century. Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York.
This drawing depicts a Cavalier man. He is wearing a
wide-brimmed hat
. Underneath his hat, you can see his
long, natural hair
. This could have been for means of
seduction
. It was considered very "sexy" for men to have long, wavy locks beneath their hats. He is also wearing a
doublet and breeches
that are both quite slim fitting. Lastly,
bucket top boots
were very popular during this time. These represented extreme
masculinity
.
wide-brimmed hat
locks
doublet
breeches
bucket top boots
A Lady with a Fan. 1645-50. The National Gallery. London. England.
This lady during the Cavalier period has
a
spaniel ears hairstyle
, where her hair
is in a bun, with free flowing curls. Her
lavish
jewlery and fan
symbolize her
wealth
.
Puffed sleeves
were common
during this time, and a
chemise
can be
seen popping through (still worn as an undergarmet). She is also wearing a
bodice
, which is the top part of the
woman's ensemble.
Spaniel ears hairstyle
full puffed sleeves
chemise
bodice
jewlery
fan
Portrait of a Lady. 1683. The National Gallery. London, England.
It looks like this woman is wearing a gown with a
bodice
and
skirt
made of satin. The dress had a tight
corset
and usually a long
train
down the back. This style was called a
mantua
. This woman is dressed very elegantly to show off her
status and hierarchy
. Women are slowly beginning to show more skin. The 3/4 sleeve was still popular and it was popular to show the
chemise
sleeves under the bodice. Also, we can see her cleavage is very easily shown, and was often for
seduction
purposes.
bodice
chemise
3/4 sleeve
mantua
full bottomed wig
jabot
Persian coat
shirt
ribbon trim
Late Restoration. 17th Century, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.
This man dresses for
status and hierarchy
. Wigs were very common and seen as very stylish. The
full bottomed wig
is shown here. The lace
jabot
becomes very long and full. His top coat, the
Persian coat
, replaces the doublet here. It is a very long coat with slimming sleeves. It does eventually get shorter over time. We are just able to see his
knee breeches
. Men showed off their legs during this time. Perhaps by a means of
seduction.
You can also see his lace trimmed
shirt
popping out, just above his hands.
knee breeches
Madame de Pompadour. 1757. The National Gallery. London, England.
Engageants
Robe a la Francaise
paniers
flowers
ruffles
This beautiful portrait of Madame de Pompadour simply displays elegance and
wealth
both at its finest. This beautiful blue gown is also known as a
Robe a la Francaise
. It is tight across the front
bodice
, and is very wide everywhere else! Underneath the gown,
paniers
are worn. These are oval hoops that keep the skirts shape in place.
Bows, lace, and flowers
were all very common motifs during the Rococo period. Take note of the
jewlery
around her wrist; this symbolizes that she possesses
wealth
. Lastly, at the ends of her sleeves are
engageants
. These are ruffles with lace.
Pietro Longhi, a Lady recieving a Cavalier, 1745-55, The National Gallery. London
breeches
chemise
waist coat
coat
periwig
This man looks like he is trying to impress this woman. He is wearing a
waist coat
; a jacket that is worn underneath the
formal coat
. Here we see the waist coat with a coat on top. This look may seem casual, but still represents
status and hierarchy
. This man is wearing what was called a
three piece suit
. Along with the coat and waistcoat,
breeches
are also worn to complete the look. He is also wearing the color gold, which shows his
wealth and nobility
. Lastly, we can see he is wearing a
periwig
on his head.
Antoine- Laurent Lavoisier and His Wife, 1788, Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York.
silk sash
chemise
chemise a la reine
ringlet curls
This dress is motivated by
status

and highly evokes
emotion
. Nobility followed Marie Antoinette's style, and by showing empathy to the poor by dressing less lavishly.
The
chemise a la reine
uses less fabric.
Simplicity
was a key motif for this time period.
For hairstyles,
tight curls
were still in style.
"Man's Coat and Waistcoat." Man's Coat and Waistcoat. Accessed November 8, 2015. http://collections.lacma.org/node/243692.
breeches
waistcoat
jacket/coat
This man is dressed in very extravangantly to demonstrate
status and hierarchy
in his
jacket, waistcoat, and breeches
. Men wore increasingly plain suits for daywear over time. The
knee high breeches
are usually made of wool or leather. These
three piece suits
were extremely popular for the Ancien Regime.
Revolution, Directoire, and Empire:
Male : 1790
From Revolution to Frivolity
From Revolution to Frivolity
From Revolution to Frivolity
From Revolution to Frivolity
From Revolution to Frivolity
From Revolution to Frivolity
From Revolution to Frivolity
From Revolution to Frivolity
From Revolution to Frivolity
From Revolution to Frivolity
Revolution, Directoire, and Empire:
Female: 1800
Romantic: Male, 1830
Romantic: Female, 1835
Crinoline: Male: 1860's
Crinoline: Female: 1865
Bustle: Male: 1870-1880
Bustle: Female: 1876
Turn of the Century: Male
Turn of the Century:
Female: 1895-1900
Ensemble,1790, Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York.
breeches
waistcoat
tailcoat
For men, the
waistcoat
was still very popular.
But, over the decades, the fancy embroidering
and embellishment disappears.
Simple colors
and patterns were present. They began to be
worn with the
tailcoat
. These
breeches
, emerged from working man's attire. Simplicity is key here. Nothing is overly extravagant looking. Lastly, we can see the a
stock
is worn.
This became a very common form of neckwear
for men. This ensemble would probably be worn by someone of a higher
status
.
stock
Liberty, 1800, Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York
chemise dress
probably wearing stockings
note the color
Seeing a resemblance to Greek or Roman sculpture, the
chemise dress
became popular.
This was a very light dress, that was considered
daring to wear because nothing was underneath it. The
corset
was abandoned for a short while.
The light dress
seductively
draped over a woman's body. Underneath, she probably would only be wearing
stockings
. Since the colors of the ancient sculptures lost their colors over the years, the chemise dress mainly came in
white
or
cream
. Sometimes there would be hints of color, but that was rather rare. These dresses were versatile in they were considered rather
seductive and scandalous
during the time period, but they still had an
elegance and grace
about them.
Coat, 1830, Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York
tailcoat
vest
pantaloons
shirt
cravat
In the Romantic period, clothing was all
about
evoking emotion
. The common
three piece suit
is being worn here.
Consisting of a
tailcoat
,
waistcoat
, and
vest
. The tailcoat and sometimes
waistcoat were padded through the chest.
The
cravat
and
shirt
can be easily seen
because the tailcoat was cut shorter in the
front and the waistcoat was cut very low. The
pantaloons
had pleats at the waist. This was
a time where men loved to accesorize. They
commonly wore
gloves, pocketwatches, and
tophats
. This could have been for means of
self expression
.
Walking ensemble, 1835, Met Museum. New York
During the 1830s, women's skirts and
sleeves begin to inflate. Women dressed
for not only
modesty but also vanity
. The
skirt starts to come up, which could have
been for
seduction
purposes. Feet are
able to be seen. Usually, women would show
off their tiny feet by wearing soft
ballet
slippers
. Even though this
gown
is rather
simple, women loved to wear
ribbons
and
floral patterns
on their dresses during this
time period.
hooped crinoline
jewelery
lace
Mademoiselle Sicot, 1865, The National Gallery of Art. Washington D.C.
Gowns
were very extravagant during this
time period. It was all about the extravagant
fabrics and vibrant colors.
Artifical dyes
produced color at an affordable cost.
Lace, ribbons,and feathers
were all decorative to
add to the gowns. This woman definitely
was of high
status
. She is wearing
jewlery

and her gown is very elaborative and underneath her dress, she was probably wearing a
corset
. Underneath her gown, she
is probably wearing a
hooped crinoline
to
give the gown shape.
gown
Godey's fashions/ Capewell and Kimmel, sc, 1865, Library of Congress, Washington D.C.
American fashions/ The Jno. J. Mitchell Co. Litho., New York, 1899, Library of Congress, Washington D.C.
Godey's Lady's Book, 1876, Library of Congress, Washington D.C.
bustle
corset
picture hat
Similar to the Crinoline period,
the dresses of the Bustle period
had beautiful
fabrics, patterns,
and colors
. Trim decoration was
popular. The
bustle
was very
popular for dinner and evening
wear. The
corset was still worn
underneath the d
ress for that very
specific shape of a thin, small
waist, and of course to emphasize
the bustle behind. Women would
commonly wear
shawl jackets
on
top of these dresses as a means
of utlity to stay warm. Women
wore
picture hats
on their heads,
as a mean for ornamentation.
Waistcoat, 1860, Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York.
Smoking jacket, 1860s, Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York.
waistcoat
jacket
During the Crinoline period,
men wore very simple, darker
colors such as
black, brown,
and gray
. But, they did wear
more fancy patterns and
brighter colors to sporting
events and for lounging in the
countryside. Matching suits
that were simply a
jacket, vest,
and trousers
became increasingly
standard and popular during
this time period. As for
accessories, men would commonly wear a
tophat, and bowtie
to complete the look. These were usually worn by middle to upperclass men by a means of
status and hierarchy
.
Men continue to wear the
three piece
business suit and top hat
. The suits
fit quite slim and the most common
colors to wear were still
dark brown,
gray, and black.
Some of these men
in the picture are also wearing
derby
hats
, which also became quite common.
To accessorize, men also liked wearing
canes
. This was a symbol of
status
.
Men would still wear lighter colors out
in the country side or for less formal
attire.
Lastly, for semi formal and dinner
events, men would wear the infamous
tuxedo!
It usually consisted of just the
jacket.
derby hat
three piece suit
top hat
tuxedo
cane
top hat
Trousers, 1870-1880, Victoria and Albert Museum. England.
coat
In contrast to women during this time period,
men seemed to dress in a very
simple
manner.
Dark colors
were still reserved for business wear and lighter colors for less formal events.
The popular
tailcoat
was usually only seen at
formal events. The
morning coat
became very
popular. It was like a normal jacket at the time,
except the edges parted at the bottom so a bit
of the vest could be seen. Men also commonly
wore
trousers
, cut with a center-buttoned cut
fly.
trousers
Ball gown, 1895-1900, Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York.
ball gown
corset
For evening wear, more delicate colors
were often worn. A woman of a high status would have most likely been able to wear
this expensive silk material. This
ball gown
was probably worn at night. Silk gowns in
shades of
cream, white, and light blue
were common. With the help of the
corset
,
the
hourglass silhouette
was still in style.
The puffs became a little less extreme.
The
floral patterns
were also delicate. As
for accessories, women may have carried
around a small
bag, or a fan.
The Twentieth Century
The Twentieth Century
The Twentieth Century
The Twentieth Century
The Twentieth Century
The Twentieth Century
The Twentieth Century
The Twentieth Century
The Twentieth Century
The Twentieth Century

Edwardian: Male
1905
Edwardian: Female 1907
WW1: Male
WW1:Female: 1915
The Great Depression: Male: 1930's
The Great Depression: Female: 1930
The Roaring Twenties: Male
The Roaring Twenties: Female
WWII: Male
WWII: Female
The Twentieth Century
The New Look/ 50's: Male
The Twentieth Century
The New Look/ 50's: Female
Lingerie Dress
Corset
neutral color
The

lingerie dress
became very popular in the
Edwardian period. It is softly fitted, and modeled after the
tea gown
that was extremely popular a few decades prior. These
simple, yet elegant
dresses were often worn in
neutral colors
of white, off-white, or very light pastels.
Lace
and beaded embroidery were common to add to the design. The
flowing sleeves
were a hige contrast to the popular puffy sleeves of the 1890's. A woman of a higher class would wear a gown like this one to show off her
status and hierarchy.
Underneath, the
corset
would still be worn to enhance that
S-Curve Silhouette
. This would throw the hips back and push the bust more forward.
Evening dress, 1907, Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York.
Gibson hairdo
Dress, English, 1947. Victoria and Albert Museum. Great Britain.
Evening Dress, 1926-27, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York.
Corset, 1905, Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York
Lounge suit
cane
B.Stern and Son men's clothing in New York, 1905. Brittanica
This is a man's clothing store advertisement in 1905. In contrast to women's fashion during
the Edwardian period, men had a much
simpler style. The
gray lounge suit
was
typical for the everyday Edwardian
businessman. Complimenting it off with
a
hat and cane
to accessorize. Sometimes
bow tie'
s were worn, but
ties
were much more common. Men still typically only wore the
colors black and gray for business wear.
flapper dress
During a period of celebration, there is usually
self expression
. During the 1920's women dressed for themselves and for their comfort. These short
flapper dresses
were easy to dance in, and simply fun to wear.
Sequins, vertical stripes, and shimmer
are added to this dress. They actually resemble partying and celebrating. Women
cut their hair
and started wearing heavy
makeup
. Big eyes and rose red lips were both emphasized. This was a means for
seduction
for women as well. They finally had the opportunity to show more skin. Along with the idea of seduction, women had to wear new undergarmets to complete the flapper look. They wore a
brassire
that was usually made of silk and lace.
John Redfern, Day Dress, 1915, Kyoto Costume Institution, Japan.
Women wore soft tailored
suits
. They are
very chic and
slimming
. Since women took
the reigns in the work force during World
War One, they needed to alter their clothing
style. Women dressed for
utility
. Daily clothing like this allowed more freedom for movement.
Rectangular shaping
became very popular. Boxy and angular, it was inspired by
Cubanism
. Here, we can see a
collar
with a floral print on it.
Utility suit
Collar
Elsa Schiaparelli, Evening Cape, 1930, Kyoto Costume Institute, Japan.
Elsa Schiaparelli
was an influential designer in the 20th century. She designed this extremely elegant
cape
. Her unusualy flair was well known. She designed
gowns
that had obscure elements to them. For example, she designed a gown with a red lobster on it. This particular cape demonstrates her
dynamism
. She showed society that fashion didn' t have to be taken too seriously, and it was fun! In contrast to the previous decade, women's clothing became a bit more
conservative
again. They aimed for
modesty
. The
natural waistline
became popular again, showing off a woman's natural curves.
Jeanne Lanvin, Suit, 1944, Kyoto Costume Institute, Japan.
Utility suit
The
Utility suit
became popular for
working class women during the
1940's. Teachers, and women who
worked in offices would wear wear
this frequently.
Square padded shoulders or shoulder pads
also became very common with this suit.
These suits were made to be
simple
and practical.
There were no crazy
fabrics or added on embellishments.
Skirts
were usually knee length and not too
revealing. As for
shoes
, thick chunky heels
were very popular. Shoes were most commonly
in the color black.
Robert Piguet, Cocktail Dress, 1951, Kyoto Costume Institute, Japan.
Tiny waist with a full skirt was the style of the 1950's. The
Shirtwaist dress
became popular for the
housewife
during this decade.
Bright, cheery, colors and patterns
were
seen frequently. These were very
feminine, and
seductive
silhouettes.
Women also commonly wore
gloves
and heels
to go along with these
dresses. Women commonly would
also wear an
apron
to throw over their
ensembles for cooking purposes.
This was a means of
utlity
.
Nipped waistline
Full skirt
crazy patterns
Gentelman's Gazette, 1950's Men's Fashion.
In the 1950's, for men, the
gray flannel suit
was very popular. All business men would wear this suit. This style originated from Ivy League colleges; young undergraduates would wear them upon entering the workforce. It was a
white shirt, buttoned down collar, and a tie.

Narrow shoulders
were common with these suits. Men only usually got to wear
stripes and plaid
at home for his sportswear. Lastly,
hats
were seen as a necessity to wear before leaving the house. Hats symbolized
status and hierarchy
, sumbolizing that you were a "working man"
From the 1920's to the 1930's, men's fashion did not change too much. During the depression,
suits
remained to be worn as a means of
utility
for work purposes. Suits were often worn with a
vest and a tie
.
Double breasted jackets
were
considered more flashy than
single breasted
ones.
Wide leg pants
were common. Hair was cut short, and sleeked back. Facial hair was rare. As far as hats, the
fedora
was the most common.
1930's Fashions, Crandon Public Library, Wisconsin.
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