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Short Stories: Point of View

My 8th graders will learn and practice Point of View.

David Stevens

on 28 March 2012

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Transcript of Short Stories: Point of View

Point of View
Point of view is the perspective from which a story is told.
Point of view may be first person, third person, or less commonly, second person.
First Person
First person point of view is a point of view in which an "I" or "we" serves as the narrator of a piece of fiction.
While first person point of view can allow a reader to feel very close to a specific character's point of view, it also limits the reader to that one perspective.
2nd Person
The second-person narrative is a narrative mode in which the protagonist or another main character is referred to by "you."
More common in Contemporary Short Stories called "Flashes."
3rd Person
The third person point of view is a form of storytelling in which a narrator relates all action in third person, using third person pronouns such as "he" or "she."
The narrator knows only the thoughts and feelings of a single character.
Third person omniscient is a method of storytelling in which the narrator knows the thoughts and feelings of all of the characters in the story.
There must have been some mistake. This can’t be happening. Prim was one slip of paper in thousands! Her chances of being chosen were so remote that I’d not even bothered to worry about her. Hadn’t I done everything? Taken the tesserae, refused to let her do the same? One slip. One slip in thousands. The odds had been entirely in her favour. But it hadn’t mattered.
Somewhere far away, I can hear the crowd murmuring unhappily, as they always do when a twelve-year-old gets chosen, because no one thinks this is fair. And then I see her, the blood drained from her face, hands clenched in fists at her sides, walking with stiff, small steps up towards the stage, passing me, and I see the back of her blouse has become untucked and hangs out over her skirt. It’s this detail, the untucked blouse forming a duck’s tail, that brings me back to myself.
“Prim!” The strangled cry comes out of my throat, and my muscles begin to move again. “Prim!” I don’t need to shove through the crowd. The other kids make way immediately, allowing me a straight path to the stage. I reach her just as she is about to mount the steps. With one sweep of my arm, I push her behind me.
“I volunteer!” I gasp. “I volunteer as tribute!”

By Suzanne Collins from The Hunger Games
What Point of View is this sample of writing?
Write this passage in 3rd Person Limited.
Write this passage in 3rd Person Omniscient.
Full transcript