Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Sonnets!

No description
by

Tyler Ringstad

on 31 October 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Sonnets!

Mine eye hath play'd the painter and hath stell'd
Thy beauty's form in table of my heart;
My body is the frame wherein 'tis held,
And perspective it is the painter's art.
For through the painter must you see his skill,
To find where your true image pictured lies;
Which in my bosom's shop is hanging still,
That hath his windows glazed with thine eyes.
Now see what good turns eyes for eyes have done:
Mine eyes have drawn thy shape, and thine for me
Are windows to my breast, where-through the sun
Delights to peep, to gaze therein on thee;
Yet eyes this cunning want to grace their art;
They draw but what they see, know not the heart.
Sonnet 24
Important Definitions
Sonnet- a poem with fourteen lines

Octave- group of eight lines
Sestet- group of six lines

Volta- turn in thought

Quatrain- group of four lines
Couplet- group of two lines


Sonnets!
The English and the Italian Sonnet
I Find No Peace

I find no peace, and all my war is done.
I fear and hope. I burn and freeze like ice.
I fly above the wind, yet can I not arise;
And nought I have, and all the world I season.
That loseth nor locketh holdeth me in prison
And holdeth me not--yet can I scape no wise--
Nor letteth me live nor die at my device,
And yet of death it giveth me occasion.
Without eyen I see, and without tongue I plain.
I desire to perish, and yet I ask health.
I love another, and thus I hate myself.
I feed me in sorrow and laugh in all my pain;
Likewise displeaseth me both life and death,
And my delight is causer of this strife.
History of the Sonnet!
Sonnet Examples!
Sonnet 18
Shall I compare thee to a summer's
day
Thou art more lovely and more
temperate
:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of
May
,
And summer's lease hath all too short a
date
:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven
shines
,
And often is his gold complexion
dimmed
,
And every fair from fair sometime
declines
,
By chance, or nature's changing course
untrimmed
:
But thy eternal summer shall not
fade
,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou
ow'st
,
Nor shall death brag thou wander'st in his
shade
,
When in eternal lines to time thou
grow'st
,
So long as men can breathe, or eyes can
see
,
So long lives this, and this gives life to
thee
.

William Shakespeare!
(c.1564-1616)
To My Brothers
SMALL, busy flames play through the fresh laid
coals
,
And their faint cracklings o’er our silence
creep

Like whispers of the household gods that
keep

A gentle empire o’er fraternal
souls
.
And while, for rhymes, I search around the
poles
,
Your eyes are fix’d, as in poetic
sleep
,
Upon the lore so voluble and
deep
,
That aye at fall of night our care
condoles
.

This is your birth-day Tom, and I
rejoice

That thus it passes smoothly,
quietly
.
Many such eves of gently whisp’ring
noise

May we together pass, and calmly
try

What are this world’s true joys,—ere the great
voice
,
From its fair face, shall bid our spirits
fly
.

John Keats! (1795-1821)
Turn back the heart you've turned
away
Give back your kissing
breath
Leave not my love as you have
left
The broken hearts of
yesterday
But wait, be still, don't lose this
way
Affection now, for what you
guess
May be something more, could be
less
Accept my love, live for
today
.

Your roses wilted, as love
spurned
Yet trust in me, my love and
truth
Dwell in my heart, from which you've
turned
My strength as great as yours
aloof
.
It is in fear you turn
away
And miss the chance of love
today
!

James DeFord!
How Do I Love Thee? (Sonnet 43)

How do I love thee? Let me count the
ways
.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and
height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of
sight
For the ends of being and ideal
grace
.
I love thee to the level of every
day's
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-
light
.
I love thee freely, as men strive for
right
.
I love thee purely, as they turn from
praise
.
I love thee with the passion put to
use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood's
faith
.
I love thee with a love I seemed to
lose
With my lost saints. I love thee with the
breath
,
Smiles, tears, of all my life; and, if God
choose
,
I shall but love thee better after
death
.

Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861)

after Robert Duncan

my earliest dreams linger/wronged spirits
who will not rest/dusky crows astride
the sweetbriar seek to fly the
orchard's sky. is this the world i loved?
groves of perfect oranges and streets of stars
where the sad eyes of my youth
wander the atomic-age paradise

tasting

the blood of a stark and wounded puberty?
o what years ago? what rapture lost in white
heat of skin/walls that patina my heart's
despair? what fear disturbs my quiet
night's grazing? stampedes my soul?

o memory. i sweat the eternal weight of graves

Wanda Coleman (1946-present)
John Keats was born in London on October 31, 1795. He was a major poet of the Romantic movement in England, but sadly died at age 24 in Rome, Italy.
A Presentation by Christenson, Riji, Ringstad, and Samson
William Shakespeare was a poet, playwright, and actor. His pieces have been studied in schools throughout the world, including Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, and selections of his multitude of sonnets.
Sir Thomas Wyatt!
translated sonnets from Italian to English
also began writing his own sonnets, imitating Petrarch
Introduced his own rhyme scheme
Giacomo de Lentini
created the sonnet in the 13th century
aristocratic themes
It's Petrarch!
Most famous early Italian sonneteer
Wrote in the 14th century
worked a lot to bring back the Classics
helped initiate the Italian renaissance
Was translated into English by...
The Sonnets of today
"Roads? Where we're going, we don't need roads."

-Dr. Emmett Lathrop Brown
New Formalists have given a bit of a rebirth to sonnets

They often play with the form (they don't need roads)
An example: the word sonnet

SEPTEMBER RAIN

If
the
maple
trees
could,
they
would
dream
of
the
healing
entrance
of
May.

-Seymour Mayne
Labeled a sonnet, but the verse form (sonnet) is stripped down to a single element -- the fourteen lines
The Significance of the Sonnet
It is no surprise that the sonnet has survived the test of time. Its structure and origins lend themselves to a sturdy framework, upon which new ideas can be hung.
Within its strict structure, difficult topics of life are addressed. Love was a common theme at the time of its conception, but the sonnet has come to encompass all themes in life that we struggle with.
During the Second World War, sonnets found a minor revival; this is perhaps because the form, structure, and echoes of love from the first sonnets were a sharp and poignant contrast to the warfare engulfing the world.
A Student-Written Example & a Few Questions
Upon a wall hangs fastly ticking time.
The cig’rette buzzes, caffeine courses strong.
Deadlines draw near and a student breathes sighs.
Dig through the work; be sure none is wrong.
The scholar’s eyes finished packing their bags,
Yet there is work undone, and tests untaken.
Books and pens lie in no good order or stage,
And thoughts float in wond’ring “what is Zen?”
When more hours have passed and flown away
Than can be counted upon fingers and toes,
A few more turns of the hand go ‘round the face,
‘Fore the author spots the time to rush from abode.
Weeks crawl by while in fear he waits
For his letters, he’s returned the “A.”
Schooling
Which form is the sonnet written in?
How do you know?

Is there a rhyme scheme?
If so, what is it?

Is there a consistent meter?
If so, what is the meter?

Is there a Volta?
If so, where is it, and what does it change?
If not, what would make a good turn of thought?
http://www.shakespeare-online.com/sonnets/24.html
http://www.sonnetwriters.com/definition-of-sonnet/
http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/i-find-no-peace/
Much of the 18th century:
Full transcript