Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Patient Education

No description
by

Christi Emerson

on 9 October 2018

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Patient Education

Health Literacy
"The degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions"
(US Department of Health and Human Services, 2010).
What type of Learner are You?
Learning Across the Lifespan
Health Education:
"...to positively change behavior through increasing knowledge about health and disease."

Domains of Learning
Cognitive (Thinking)

Learning which includes all intellectual behaviors and requires thought. Includes knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation
(Bloom's Taxonomy)
Objectives
1. Define key terms related to health education.

2. Analyze factors that affect learning.

3. Apply appropriate methods of learning for age groups across the lifespan.

4. Identify strategies to evaluate effective learning.
Patient Education
Health Program Planning
Public health nursing activities include
Health Teaching

as depicted in the
Public Health Intervention Wheel and the
10 Essential Public health Services
Six Assumptions of Adult Learners
1. The adult needs to know why they are learning.

2. The adult's own experiences are an important part of the learning process.

3. Adults need to participate in the planning and evaluation of their learning.

4. Adults learn better if the information has immediate relevance.

5. Adults like problem-centered approaches to learning.

6. Adults respond better to internal rather than external motivation.
Christi Emerson EdD, MSN, RN
The Purpose
Definition
"...any combination of planned learning experiences
based on sound theories that provide individuals, groups, and communities the opportunity to acquire information and the skills needed to make quality health decisions."
(Savage, Kub, & Groves, 2016, p. 38)
Text, pg. 37
The 10 Essential Public Health Services
Text, pg. 327
Affective (Feeling)
Learning which deals with expression and feelings including acceptance of attitudes, opinions, and values
Psychomotor (Doing)
Physically encoding information with movement
and/or activity where the gross and fine muscles
are used for expressing or interpreting information
or concepts
Skills
Text, pg 40
Improving self-efficacy in decisions about healthcare.
Education, health services, and social/cultural factors converge.
Improves Health Outcomes
Lowers Health Costs
Theories of Education
Behaviorism
- conditioning and behavioral
change with environmental stimulus that
results in a response.
Cognitivism
mental activity where behavior
changes based on knowledge that changes
thought patterns.
Constructivism
- construct our own world view as
knowledge and experience increase.
Humanism
- uses feelings and relationships,
encouraging the development of personal actions
to fulfill one's greatest potential
http://www.educationplanner.org/students/self-assessments/learning-styles.shtml
Auditory
Visual
Tactile/Kinesthetic
The way you learn impacts the way you teach!
Methods of Teaching:
One-on-One Discussion
Group Teaching
Written Materials
Demonstration
Role Play
Analogies
Story Telling
Dolls/Puppets
Coloring/Story Books
Journey Boards
Teaching and Development
Education must be appropriate for both age and developmental level.
Additional Considerations
Patients with Learning Disabilities
Generational Differences
Barriers
Anticipatory Guidance

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs
Domains of Learning
Steps in Developing a Health Education Teaching Plan
Text, pg. 42, Box 2-3
1. Identify the health education need in the selected population (individual, family, community)

2. Assess the learner: Include health literacy, culture, language, age and learning style.

3. Write a goal for the teaching intervention.

4. Write specific measurable objectives for the teaching intervention. (Consider Bloom's taxonomy)

5. Identify materials and resource needs for the teaching plan: Include the appropriate teaching environment and the length of the lesson.

6. Describe the lesson: Include key concepts.

7. Write out the procedure step by step for teaching the lesson using a variety of teaching methods.

8. Have a plan for the evaluation.
Health Program Planning

Precede-Proceed Model
1) Health problems and risks are caused by multiple factors
2) Efforts to produce change must be multidimensional, multisectoral, and participatory.
PRECEDE
P
redisposing,
R
einforcing, and
E
nabling factors, and
C
auses in
E
ducational
D
esign and
E
valuation.
Precede-Proceed Model, cont.
PROCEED
P
olicy,
R
egulatory,
O
rganizational,
C
onstructs in
E
ducation, and
E
nvironmental
D
esign
Community assessment identifies needs
that direct collaborations and program
development.
Recipient participation improves
likelihood of behavioral change.
Logic Model
5 Steps
Inputs (Resources)
-
What is needed?
Activities
-
What needs to occur to reach goals?
Outputs
-
What do we expect after activities?
Outcomes
-
What changes will occur in 1-3 and 4-6 years?
Impact
-
What changes will occur in 7-10 year?
Figure 5-1, p. 114

Example: Table 5-2, p. 115
Steps to Health Program Planning
Table 5-1 p. 113
Evaluation Models
Formative Evaluation

"...occurs during the development of a program, while the activities are forming and being implemented for the first time" (Savage, Kub, & Groves, 2016, p. 125).
Summative Evaluation
"...occurs at the end of the program and is the evaluation of the objectives and goals" (Savage, Kub, & Groves, 2016, p. 126).
Full transcript