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If you were coming in the fall

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Adriana M

on 28 November 2016

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Transcript of If you were coming in the fall

By: Adriana Martinho
April 8, 2015
4th period
Mrs. Orozco

If you were coming in the fall
Emily Dickinson became very fond of writing when she first started school. She loved school, and English was her favorite subject. Emily Dickinson wrote different genres of poetry, such as love, nature, life, etc. By the age of 35, Dickinson had written 800 poems, 100 in which she sent out to be published. After Dickinson passed away in 1886 in Amherst , her family found forty volumes with 1800 poems that were later on published and were placed in chronological order by Ralph W. Franklin. Her first volume of poetry
Emily Dickinson
The shift of the poem was made on the fifth stanza. Throughout the poem, Dickinson talks about how much time it will be until she sees her love one, but then towards the fifth stanza, she begins to believe that he might not even come for her, and the mood starts to become sad.
Style, shift, syntax and tone

If you were coming in the fall,
I ’d brush the summer by
With half a smile and half a spurn,
As housewives do a fly.

Analyzing the Poem
If I could see you in a year,
I ’d wind the months in balls,
And put them each in separate drawers,
Until their time befalls.

Analyzing the Poem
Work Cited
Analyzing the Poem
Analyzing the Poem
Analyzing the Poem
Pieces of Literary Devices
Pieces of Literary Devices
Pieces of Literary Devices
If only centuries delayed,
I ’d count them on my hand,
Subtracting till my fingers dropped
Into Van Diemen’s land.

If certain, when this life was out,
That yours and mine should be,
I ’d toss it yonder like a rind,
And taste eternity.

But now, all ignorant of the length
Of time’s uncertain wing,
It goads me, like the goblin bee,
That will not state its sting.

Simile: like the goblin bee,That will not state its sting.
- compares the bee to her not knowing how much time it will be until she sees the boy she loves
- helps me understand the poem because I know how it feels when a bee is around me, and just continues to be around, but doesn't sting. There is that feeling of anxiety because you never know when it will happen, just like Dickinson doesn't know when the boy will come back for her.
In the first stanza, Emily Dickinson is saying, If I could see you in the fall, I would make summer leave faster, so that I can be with you. The "you" she is referring to is the boy she is in love with. She will be very happy if the boy she loves comes to her, and she compares this happiness to a housewife killing a bug because housewives do not like bugs, so they get very happy when it is dead.
In the second stanza, Emily Dickinson is saying if the boy comes to her next year, then she hopes these months pass by very quickly. She would make the months into small balls and keep them in separate drawers until the boy comes to her.
In the third stanza, she talks about if she will see her love in centuries, then she will count them with her fingers. She uses the words centuries for exaggeration because she believes her love will never come for her, and that is why she says that she will count down the centuries with her fingers until van Diemen's land, which is basically until she dies or gets over him.
In the fourth stanza, Dickinson is talking about how if she can be with her love after death, then she wants to die very soon, so she can be with him forever.
In the fifth stanza, Dickinson says how her not knowing how much time she must wait to see the boy is very annoying and stressful because she really wants to see the boy. She compares this worry to a bee not knowing who to sting because it builds up someone's worries because they will be scared that they can be stung at any time, but not know what time it will be.
Hyperbole: If only centuries delayed,
I ’d count them on my hand
- Emily Dickinson exaggerates by saying it will be centuries until she sees the boy she is in love with
- helps me to understand the poem better because it shows me how much she truly cares and loves this boy, and shows how she cannot wait until she sees the love of her life.
Metaphor: With half a smile and half a spurn, As housewives do a fly.
- comparing the happiness she will get if the boy comes to her
- helps me to understand that she truly does love the boy, and he makes her very happy.
Rhyme scheme: A B C B
Denotative and Connotative language
Repetition: Emily Dickinson constantly uses the word "If" throughout this poem.
- this helps me understand the poem because it shows that she is not really sure if the boy will come to her or not.

Allusion: Into Van Diemen’s land.
- this helps me understand the poem because by mentioning Viemen's land, it basically means that the boy is too far away, and he should come closer and be with her because she truly does love and care for this boy.
"What Is Syntax? - All About Linguistics - Original." What Is Syntax? - All About Linguistics - Original. N.p., n.d. Web. 04 May 2015.
Style: Free Verse
Chobharkar, Pankaj. "Poetry Styles." Buzzle. Buzzle.com, n.d. Web. 04 May 2015.
Poets.org. Academy of American Poets, n.d. Web. 05 May 2015.
was published in 1890, and was
continued until 1955.
The tone of the poem is calm and soothing. It is happy, yet sad. Happy because Dickinson talks about the love of her life, sad because time keeps passing, and the boy is not showing up.
Syntax: I ’d toss it yonder like a rind
But now, all ignorant of the length
"Emily Dickinson." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 05 May 2015.
"Emily Dickinson." Poetry Foundation. Poetry Foundation, n.d. Web. 05 May 2015.
"Emily Dickinson: The Writing Years (1855-1865) | Emily Dickinson Museum." Emily Dickinson: The Writing Years (1855-1865) | Emily Dickinson Museum. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 May 2015.

Connotative: I ’d wind the months in balls, And put them each in separate drawers
Denotative: If only centuries delayed, I ’d count them on my hand
Subtracting till my fingers dropped Into Van Diemen’s land.
I ’d toss it yonder like a rind, And taste eternity.
If certain, when this life was out, That yours and mine should be
I ’d brush the summer by
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