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E4: Waiting for Godot

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john meehan

on 15 May 2013

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Transcript of E4: Waiting for Godot

Not "here" as in school -- but "here" as in "here in this world." Warm-Up Why are we here? Jot your thoughts down now. "If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him." - François-Marie Arouet de Voltaire (1694-1778) "Belief is a wise wager. Granted that faith cannot be proved, what harm will come to you if you gamble on its truth and it proves false? If you gain, you gain all; if you lose, you lose nothing. Wager, then, without hesitation, that He exists." - Blaise Pascal (1623-1662) "Religion is nothing but an opiate for the masses." - Karl Marx (1818-1883) You are about to read a play that is universally regarded as one of the most brilliant and challenging works ever written. It will force you to question everything you believe and examine your reasons for holding these beliefs. There are no WRONG answers, per se...

But if you give an answer in today's class, you will need to point to EVIDENCE FROM THE TEXT that led you to the answer you have provided. That warm-up was tricky!!! In This Play: Suppose we repented... Are we tied... to Godot? SYMBOLISM? There's man all over for you, blaming on his boots the faults of his feet. Nothing to be done. What is your reaction to this image? Is it funny? Offensive? Pointless? True? Explain your thinking . "silence" = 148
"pause" = 83
"wait(ing)" = 59
"nothing" = 46 POZZO LUCKY DIDI & GOGO nothing to be done. Two thieves were crucified with him, one on his right and the other on his left. Those passing by reviled him, shaking their heads and saying, “You who would destroy the temple and rebuild it in three days, save yourself, if you are the Son of God, [and] come down from the cross!”

Likewise the chief priests with the scribes and elders mocked him and said, “He saved others; he cannot save himself. So he is the king of Israel! Let him come down from the cross now, and we will believe in him.

He trusted in God; let him deliver him now if he wants him. For he said, ‘I am the Son of God. The thieves who were crucified with him also kept abusing him in the same way. M
A
T
T
H
E
W It was nine o’clock in the morning when they crucified him. The inscription of the charge against him read, “The King of the Jews.”With him they crucified two thieves one on his right and one on his left. Those passing by reviled him, shaking their heads and saying, “Aha! You who would destroy the temple and rebuild it in three days, save yourself by coming down from the cross.”

Likewise the chief priests, with the scribes, mocked him among themselves and said, “He saved others; he cannot save himself.

Let the Messiah, the King of Israel, come down now from the cross that we may see and believe.” Those who were crucified with him also kept abusing him. M
A
R
K Now two others, both criminals, were led away with him to be executed. When they came to the place called the Skull, they crucified him and the criminals there, one on his right, the other on his left. Now one of the criminals hanging there reviled Jesus, saying, “Are you not the Messiah? Save yourself and us.”

The other, however, rebuking him, said in reply, “Have you no fear of God, for you are subject to the same condemnation? And indeed, we have been condemned justly, for the sentence we received corresponds to our crimes, but this man has done nothing criminal." Then he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.”

He replied to him, “Amen, I say to you, today you will be with me in Paradise.” L
U
K
E So they took Jesus, and carrying the cross himself he went out to what is called the Place of the Skull, in Hebrew, Golgotha.

There they crucified him, and with him two others, one on either side, with Jesus in the middle.

Pilate also had an inscription written and put on the cross. It read, “Jesus the Nazorean, the King of the Jews.” J
O
H
N CHARACTERS (a play by) PURGATORY
W.B. YEATS 1938 "Nothing is more real than nothing." The sun was shining on the sea,
Shining with all his might:
He did his very best to make
The billows smooth and bright--
And this was odd, because it was
The middle of the night.


The moon was shining sulkily,
Because she thought the sun
Had got no business to be there
After the day was done--
"It's very rude of him," she said,
"To come and spoil the fun!" The eldest Oyster looked at him,
But never a word he said:
The eldest Oyster winked his eye,
And shook his heavy head--
Meaning to say he did not choose
To leave the oyster-bed.


But four young Oysters hurried up,
All eager for the treat:
Their coats were brushed, their faces washed,
Their shoes were clean and neat--
And this was odd, because, you know,
They hadn't any feet.


Four other Oysters followed them,
And yet another four;
And thick and fast they came at last,
And more, and more, and more--
All hopping through the frothy waves,
And scrambling to the shore.


The Walrus and the Carpenter
Walked on a mile or so,
And then they rested on a rock
Conveniently low:
And all the little Oysters stood
And waited in a row. The sea was wet as wet could be,
The sands were dry as dry.
You could not see a cloud, because
No cloud was in the sky:
No birds were flying overhead--
There were no birds to fly.


The Walrus and the Carpenter
Were walking close at hand;
They wept like anything to see
Such quantities of sand:
"If this were only cleared away,"
They said, "it would be grand!"


"If seven maids with seven mops
Swept it for half a year.
Do you suppose," the Walrus said,
"That they could get it clear?"
"I doubt it," said the Carpenter,
And shed a bitter tear.


"O Oysters, come and walk with us!"
The Walrus did beseech.
"A pleasant walk, a pleasant talk,
Along the briny beach:
We cannot do with more than four,
To give a hand to each." "The time has come," the Walrus said,
"To talk of many things:
Of shoes--and ships--and sealing-wax--
Of cabbages--and kings--
And why the sea is boiling hot--
And whether pigs have wings."


"But wait a bit," the Oysters cried,
"Before we have our chat;
For some of us are out of breath,
And all of us are fat!"
"No hurry!" said the Carpenter.
They thanked him much for that.


"A loaf of bread," the Walrus said,
"Is what we chiefly need:
Pepper and vinegar besides
Are very good indeed--
Now if you're ready, Oysters dear,
We can begin to feed."


"But not on us!" the Oysters cried,
Turning a little blue.
"After such kindness, that would be
A dismal thing to do!"
"The night is fine," the Walrus said.
"Do you admire the view? "It was so kind of you to come!
And you are very nice!"
The Carpenter said nothing but
"Cut us another slice:
I wish you were not quite so deaf--
I've had to ask you twice!"


"It seems a shame," the Walrus said,
"To play them such a trick,
After we've brought them out so far,
And made them trot so quick!"
The Carpenter said nothing but
"The butter's spread too thick!"


"I weep for you," the Walrus said:
"I deeply sympathize."
With sobs and tears he sorted out
Those of the largest size,
Holding his pocket-handkerchief
Before his streaming eyes.


"O Oysters," said the Carpenter,
"You've had a pleasant run!
Shall we be trotting home again?'
But answer came there none--
And this was scarcely odd, because
They'd eaten every one. THE WALRUS
THE CARPENTER and By Lewis Carroll (1872) MORAL RELATIVISM "There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so." Hamlet (II.ii) The philosophical notion that there is no such thing as absolute "right" or "wrong" -- everything is simply "right" or "wrong" relative to the particular situation. In other words: There is nothing universally "good" or "bad" -- every case is different. A form of drama that emphasizes the absurdity of human existence by employing disjointed, repetitious, and meaningless dialogue, purposeless and confusing situations, and plots that lack realistic or logical development. "THIS DOESN'T MAKE SENSE!"
SO WHAT? WHY DOES IT HAVE TO MAKE SENSE? "Tell him . . . tell him you saw us. You did see us, didn't you?" sheep & goats
tennis
the boy
The Net
a bit of rope ACT I RECAP: "You're sure you saw me, you won't come and tell me tomorrow that you never saw me! " - Democritus (460-370 B.C.) "What is truth?" - Pontius Pilate (John 18:38) ACT I ACT II
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