Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

THE ABENAKI TRIBE

No description
by

Katie Fornelius

on 9 September 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of THE ABENAKI TRIBE

THE ABENAKI TRIBE
Where they lived and how they used their surroundings to their advantage.
What food did they eat?
Fun Facts
Where they lived
The Abenaki Tribe lived in the North Eastern woodlands, in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont.
How they lived
The Abenaki people would build wigwams to live in. These are made with sassafras, birch wood, and cattails.
How they used their surroundings to their advantage
Since they live in the woodlands, they have wood and leaves readily available at all times. That's why wigwams where the housing in Abenaki villages. The terrain was appealing to deer and moose, so hunters could find food easier than, lets say, plain native americans.
What did they eat?
They hunted deer, moose, and fished in the rivers. Modern Abenakis still cherish these practices today. Abenaki indians also planted corn and beans, picked berries, made maple syrup from tree sap.
How did they hunt their food?
Abenaki fisherman used pronged spears like this one:
They also used nets

Abenaki hunters used bow and arrow, spears, and heavy wooden clubs.

How they grew crops.
They had good soil to grow certain crops, like corn and beans.
What could they find in the forest?
The Abenaki had an abundant supply of resources such as rabbit, moose, deer, fish in streams, birds, and of course plants.
How did they get to places without cars?
The Abenaki people was well known for their birch back canoes. Canoe-ing is still popular among the Abenaki people.
They Made their own languages
The Abenaki tribe made their own language! A few words are:
Kway- Welcome
Goodbye- Adio
Yes- Oho
No- Nda
How are you- Doni Gedowiowzin (Ged-ow-i-ow-zin)
The word Abenaki
The word Abenaki means "People of the Dawn" or "Easteners". They also went by Alnombak which means "The People". Some spelling variations of Abenaki are Abnaki, Abanaki, and Abenaqui.
Video:

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&ved=0ahUKEwi3sLWIzIDPAhVU5mMKHYjWB54QjRwIBw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.iaismuseum.org%2Fvillage.shtml&psig=AFQjCNGMRDJylYMNHL8koUyDXeqHwe_1tg&ust=1473452396075926
Sources:
https://firstnationculturaltours.com/site/wigwam/
http://www.iaismuseum.org/village.shtml
https://www.quora.com/Why-is-a-two-pronged-spear-more-effective-than-a-regular-spear
http://www.bigorrin.org/abenaki_kids.htm
https://www.warpaths2peacepipes.com/indian-tribes/abenaki-tribe.htm
http://firstpeoplesofcanada.com/fp_groups/fp_wh2.html
goo.gl/uYgJPo
Full transcript