Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

You Don't Need a Crystal Ball: Finding What's True on the We

No description
by

Victoria Waddle

on 5 October 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of You Don't Need a Crystal Ball: Finding What's True on the We

Research Skills: Website Evaluation
You Don't Need a Crystal Ball: Finding What's True on the Web
by
Victoria Waddle, Chaffey High School
A note on the truly malicious . . .
Institute for Historical Review
Other Ways to Check Your Sources
Snopes.com--
general interest
Your Task:
Vaccines and Autism:
Hoax
Objectives
Students will:
Understand that not all information on the Internet is true
Understand why it is important to evaluate websites
Be able to evaluate websites on their own for
C
urrency,
A
uthority,
R
eliability and
P
urpose
A
uthority
R
eliability
C
urrency
P
urpose
Parody/satire can teach you--"A Modest Proposal."
Something's fishy
Generally considered reliable, but does have reader-created content. Pay attention!
Your politics will dictate your sense of reliability.
Commercial--reputable companies
don't lie, but they don't have to
tell the whole truth either.
Spoof--parody and you are supposed to be in on the joke (not trying to fool you)
Reliability and Purpose--more than one issue is common.
Highly reliable source (our database)
but is it current?
Stormfront
Looks like research? Check other sources you know to be reliable.
Do a web search on the editor/sponsoring organization/author/followers.
Who
is
Mark Weber?
Who is David Duke?
Factcheck.org--
political interest
Background
1.Read the entire (short) article here:
http://goo.gl/qfTE9U
2. Take notes on other
required
sources (following).
3. Bowtie brainstorm
in pairs. (See example.)
4. Decide in pairs whether
article passes the CARP test.
5. Back your answer with facts.


Does information in the article on the "Age of Autism" website pass the CARP test? Support your answer with your research.
Sources:
1. Above article--read the whole thing online (very short).
2. Video referenced in the article--watch it.
3. Center for Disease Control (article accuses CDC of hiding facts)
did they rebut the article?
do they have a general statement on vaccines and autism?
4. Student Resource Center Database article on the controversy
key words: autism, vaccine. BIG HINT because this one's hard
--search within results for CNN. Recall that the story broke in August 2014.
5. CNN.com
key words autism, vaccines,
ALSO name of whistleblower (Bill Thompson)--narrow your research! (Hint: what is iReport?)
6. Snopes and Factcheck
which is better for this story?
look for specific CDC controversy--narrow your research!
Lowry, Rich. Jenny McCarthy with son Evan Asher. Digital image. New York Post. New York Post, 18 Mar. 2014. Web. 07 Jan. 2015.
Andrew Wakefield. Digital image. A Shot of Truth. Focus Autism, n.d. Web. 7 Jan. 2015.
http://goo.gl/TBntEZ
http://goo.gl/78WAOb
So what. Who is that?
A way to check for bias--mission statements will let you know purpose (not everyone is hiding bias, but you don't know the purpose until you look!)
Your politics will dictate
your snse of reliability.
Full transcript